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By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2000
The refrigerators and washing machines at Circuit City will soon make way for more digital cameras and DVD players as the retailer departs the cutthroat home appliance business to focus on booming digital entertainment. Under a three-year strategy announced yesterday, Circuit City Stores Inc. hopes to transform itself into an exclusive retailer of consumer electronics, with plans to partially remodel its 573 superstores, close eight distribution centers and eliminate 1,000 jobs. The chain decided to get out of the appliance category altogether after sales weakened and competition intensified during the past few months, the company said.
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BUSINESS
By Ken Sheinkopf and Ken Sheinkopf,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 28, 2005
Q: We're remodeling our kitchen and will soon be shopping for new appliances. Do you think ones marked "energy-efficient" are worth their higher costs? Can we really save that much by buying efficient products? A: You sure can. Because the average homeowner spends more than $1,300 each year just to operate home appliances and lights, a number of states started setting up minimum appliance energy standards in the 1970s, leading to the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act in 1987 and the development of national energy standards for more home appliances and equipment.
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BUSINESS
By Ken Sheinkopf and Ken Sheinkopf,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 28, 2005
Q: We're remodeling our kitchen and will soon be shopping for new appliances. Do you think ones marked "energy-efficient" are worth their higher costs? Can we really save that much by buying efficient products? A: You sure can. Because the average homeowner spends more than $1,300 each year just to operate home appliances and lights, a number of states started setting up minimum appliance energy standards in the 1970s, leading to the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act in 1987 and the development of national energy standards for more home appliances and equipment.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2000
The refrigerators and washing machines at Circuit City will soon make way for more digital cameras and DVD players as the retailer departs the cutthroat home appliance business to focus on booming digital entertainment. Under a three-year strategy announced yesterday, Circuit City Stores Inc. hopes to transform itself into an exclusive retailer of consumer electronics, with plans to partially remodel its 573 superstores, close eight distribution centers and eliminate 1,000 jobs. The chain decided to get out of the appliance category altogether after sales weakened and competition intensified during the past few months, the company said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- U.S. industrial production grew faster than expected in March, while housing starts remained near an eight-year high, reports showed yesterday in signs that the economy continues to expand at a vigorous pace.Output at factories, mines and utilities increased 0.9 percent last month -- the biggest gain since April 1996 -- led by production of big-ticket goods such as home appliances, furniture, computers and autos, the Federal Reserve said.Following February's 0.6 percent increase, factory output grew at a 5.6 percent annual rate in the first quarter, up from the fourth quarter's 4.5 percent.
NEWS
By Robert Gee and Robert Gee,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The year 2000 could spell doomsday for many common home appliances such as microwaves, answering machines and VCRs, several House members warned yesterday.Any product that operates with an internal clock -- even those that don't appear to keep track of the date or year -- could go haywire at one tick past midnight on New Year's Day 2000. The microchip that performs its automated functions might not be able to recognize the difference between the year 2000 and the year 1900.Other items that risk malfunctioning or shutting down include security systems, light timers, air conditioning and heating systems, elevators, video recorders, sprinkler systems, automated teller machines and bar-code scanners.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2007
Microchip Technology Inc. Shares dropped $4.64, or 12 percent, to $31.98 after the maker of analog processors for home appliances reported second-quarter profit that missed analysts' estimates amid slowing demand.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 29, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Factory orders for big-ticket goods rebounded in April, another sign that the U.S. economy is poised for more growth in the months ahead.Autos and military aircraft led April's 1.4 percent increase in orders for durable goods, expensive items expected to last three years or more, Commerce Department figures yesterday showed. Orders for industrial machinery and primary metals also rose, while those for civilian aircraft and electronic equipment declined."Consumer sentiment is at record levels, indicating continued support for consumer spending in the months ahead," said Chris Simpson, general manager for home appliances at Whirlpool Corp.
NEWS
By Baltimoresun.com Staff | April 22, 2005
Baltimore County will hold a recycling event next week where residents can drop off unwanted electronics in Towson, the Department of Public Works said today. The event will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on April 30 at the Carver Center for Arts and Technology at 938 York Road, half a mile south of Beltway Exit 26 off of Interstate 695. Residents may bring computers, monitors, printers, keyboards, scanners and other accessories; televisions, VCRs, and DVD players; and other home electronics to be recycled.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | November 14, 1990
A federal grand jury today indicted the U.S. Naval Academy's former public works officer, Capt. James E. Weston, on conspiracy, bribery and obstruction of justice charges for allegedly accepting numerous home appliances and machinery from an Annapolis contractor in return for awarding him Navy construction contracts worth at least $3.7 million.Assistant U.S. Attorney Jane F. Barrett also charged the Naval Academy's former civilian construction director, Eugene E. Hook, with one conspiracy count in a criminal information document filed today in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- U.S. industrial production grew faster than expected in March, while housing starts remained near an eight-year high, reports showed yesterday in signs that the economy continues to expand at a vigorous pace.Output at factories, mines and utilities increased 0.9 percent last month -- the biggest gain since April 1996 -- led by production of big-ticket goods such as home appliances, furniture, computers and autos, the Federal Reserve said.Following February's 0.6 percent increase, factory output grew at a 5.6 percent annual rate in the first quarter, up from the fourth quarter's 4.5 percent.
NEWS
By Robert Gee and Robert Gee,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The year 2000 could spell doomsday for many common home appliances such as microwaves, answering machines and VCRs, several House members warned yesterday.Any product that operates with an internal clock -- even those that don't appear to keep track of the date or year -- could go haywire at one tick past midnight on New Year's Day 2000. The microchip that performs its automated functions might not be able to recognize the difference between the year 2000 and the year 1900.Other items that risk malfunctioning or shutting down include security systems, light timers, air conditioning and heating systems, elevators, video recorders, sprinkler systems, automated teller machines and bar-code scanners.
NEWS
April 5, 1996
W. Haywood Burns, 55, a civil rights attorney and former dean of the City University of New York law school at Queens, died Tuesday in a car accident in South Africa. He died along with CUNY associate professor Margaret Shanara Gilbert. They were attending a conference sponsored by the International Association of Democratic Lawyers Congress. Mr. Burns represented the Attica prison inmates, Martin Luther King Jr. and black radical Angela Davis in the late 1960s and early '70s. He founded the National Conference of Black Lawyers and was chief counsel for Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign of 1968.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | March 21, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A bill to give wholesale distributors some economic power against the manufacturers who supply them fell victim yesterday to fears about protectionism and special interest lobbying.By 70-63, the House of Delegates handed a rare floor vote defeat to the bill that would have established a set of rules by which manufacturers must deal with Maryland distributors.In an extraordinary debate on the House floor yesterday, supporters and opponents aired accusations about improper lobbying, influence-peddling and legislative overreaching.
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