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By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
With so many home mortgages underwater, perhaps it's little wonder that interior designers have found inspiration in the murky depths of the sea. Let's call it turning a negative into a positive. The rustic, woodsy themes of the fall and winter have given way to crisp, blue nautical themes that are expected to dominate home decor for the next few months at national retail outlets like Target as well as small chains and locally owned shops. "Nautical is super-trendy right now," said Gary Godby, a manager at Trohv, a home store with locations in Hampden and Washington.
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By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
With so many home mortgages underwater, perhaps it's little wonder that interior designers have found inspiration in the murky depths of the sea. Let's call it turning a negative into a positive. The rustic, woodsy themes of the fall and winter have given way to crisp, blue nautical themes that are expected to dominate home decor for the next few months at national retail outlets like Target as well as small chains and locally owned shops. "Nautical is super-trendy right now," said Gary Godby, a manager at Trohv, a home store with locations in Hampden and Washington.
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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Staff Writer | February 21, 1993
A growing interest?Amazingly enough, the earliest record of a garden layout we have is 4,000 years old. Found in the tomb of an Egyptian court official, it's a doll-size model made of wood and painted. The sycamore figs and some bunched papyrus canes are still recognizable.If you're a lover of gardens and this sort of historical detail fascinates you, a new book, "Gardening Through the Ages" (Simon & Schuster, $50) is a must-have. The author, Penelope Hobhouse, is a noted garden designer and authority on historic gardens.
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By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | July 22, 2011
For millions of years, crabs have been scuttling about the bottom of the world's oceans and bays, but few regions have embraced the mean-spirited, omnivorous crustacean with as much vigor as we have here in Maryland. When I moved here from the Midwest and soon after attended my first crab feast, I remember thinking, "What is wrong with these people?" Sitting in the hot sun for hours at a clip, smashing steamed crustaceans with a mallet and then sorting through razor-sharp bits of shell and crab entrails for a thimbleful of meat seemed more like some sort of torture than a good time.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1997
The natural lookWhimsical nature motifs dance across Rebecca Adler Greenwell's new home-furnishings collection. The Baltimore-based artist is known for her decorative mailboxes, clocks, flower pots and picture frames; now she's added a line of hand-crafted tables and lamps.You can buy her pieces at ZYZYX! in the Festival at Woodholme. The new collection will be on exhibit Sept. 4-30; and Greenwell herself will be at the craft store Saturday, Sept. 6, from noon to 5 p.m. to introduce the collection and sign her pieces.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | January 15, 1995
No, your memory isn't at fault. Beadazzled, one of Baltimore's largest bead stores, moved last week from the southeast corner of North Charles and Franklin streets to the northeast when differences with the former landlord couldn't be worked out.Its new quarters at 501 N. Charles have the same large selection of beads, crafts and home accessories from around the world (textiles, boxes, candlesticks, pottery). Beadazzled also offers craft classes; call (410) 837-2323 for information.Catalogs for the homeYou don't have to do more than look in today's mail to know that catalog shopping is bigger than ever.
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | March 4, 2007
His shop is a hot destination on Kings Road in the heart of London's trendy Chelsea district. But British designer William Yeoward is considered a style-maker on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Yeoward's antiques and designs - in fabric, crystal, china, furniture and home accessories - always seem fresh. Whether it's color (often bold or unexpected combinations), pattern (familiar but edgy), texture, finish or form that make them special, his handcrafted pieces stand out in the design world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2011
The mall will be waiting this weekend, like always. But people searching for originality will probably head to Baltimore, where more than 700 artists will be selling one-of-a-kind things. The American Craft Council show isn't just Maryland's biggest crafts event — it's the largest in the country, and among the most prestigious. Masters in metal, glass, fiber, wood and ceramics will be showcasing their work, and everything is for sale. Jewelry. Furniture. Clothing. Home accessories.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | July 22, 2011
For millions of years, crabs have been scuttling about the bottom of the world's oceans and bays, but few regions have embraced the mean-spirited, omnivorous crustacean with as much vigor as we have here in Maryland. When I moved here from the Midwest and soon after attended my first crab feast, I remember thinking, "What is wrong with these people?" Sitting in the hot sun for hours at a clip, smashing steamed crustaceans with a mallet and then sorting through razor-sharp bits of shell and crab entrails for a thimbleful of meat seemed more like some sort of torture than a good time.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | November 29, 1992
Designing women always have been a fixture of the fashion industry, from Coco Chanel to Donna Karan, but in the world of interiors, female names have not exactly been household words.It was in this environment that interior designer Bebe Winkler successfully but quietly plied her trade for nearly 25 years. Since she began decorating rooms in 1969, she has gathered a sophisticated, moneyed, international clientele and accolades for excellence in her profession. She has been widely published in home fashion magazines, including the prestigious Architectural Digest, as early as 1979, when just a handful of women had been featured.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2011
The mall will be waiting this weekend, like always. But people searching for originality will probably head to Baltimore, where more than 700 artists will be selling one-of-a-kind things. The American Craft Council show isn't just Maryland's biggest crafts event — it's the largest in the country, and among the most prestigious. Masters in metal, glass, fiber, wood and ceramics will be showcasing their work, and everything is for sale. Jewelry. Furniture. Clothing. Home accessories.
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | March 4, 2007
His shop is a hot destination on Kings Road in the heart of London's trendy Chelsea district. But British designer William Yeoward is considered a style-maker on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Yeoward's antiques and designs - in fabric, crystal, china, furniture and home accessories - always seem fresh. Whether it's color (often bold or unexpected combinations), pattern (familiar but edgy), texture, finish or form that make them special, his handcrafted pieces stand out in the design world.
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | August 7, 2005
As much as he respects classical style, 43-year-old fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi doesn't mind raising an eyebrow or two. He is known for simple garments that often are as exuberant as their maker, laced with delightfully unexpected bold color, pattern, trims and combinations of fabric, like casual fleece with silk and wool. The New York designer of haute couture made a daring segue to the masses two years ago with fashion for Target. So it came as no surprise when Target invited him to bring his stylish sizzle into the home this year.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1997
The natural lookWhimsical nature motifs dance across Rebecca Adler Greenwell's new home-furnishings collection. The Baltimore-based artist is known for her decorative mailboxes, clocks, flower pots and picture frames; now she's added a line of hand-crafted tables and lamps.You can buy her pieces at ZYZYX! in the Festival at Woodholme. The new collection will be on exhibit Sept. 4-30; and Greenwell herself will be at the craft store Saturday, Sept. 6, from noon to 5 p.m. to introduce the collection and sign her pieces.
FEATURES
By Sharon Overton and Sharon Overton,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | August 11, 1996
Once we were content to wear the occasional designer label on our T-shirts or jeans.Then we discovered the joy of sleeping on designer sheets.Now everything from soap dishes and cereal bowls to wall paint and mattress covers comes with a designer label. In the '90s, nesting has replaced social climbing, and haute couture has led to home couture. No longer are fashion designers content simply to fill our closets. They're out to fulfill our domestic fantasies as well.Do you long for a home with the patina of old money?
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | January 15, 1995
No, your memory isn't at fault. Beadazzled, one of Baltimore's largest bead stores, moved last week from the southeast corner of North Charles and Franklin streets to the northeast when differences with the former landlord couldn't be worked out.Its new quarters at 501 N. Charles have the same large selection of beads, crafts and home accessories from around the world (textiles, boxes, candlesticks, pottery). Beadazzled also offers craft classes; call (410) 837-2323 for information.Catalogs for the homeYou don't have to do more than look in today's mail to know that catalog shopping is bigger than ever.
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | August 7, 2005
As much as he respects classical style, 43-year-old fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi doesn't mind raising an eyebrow or two. He is known for simple garments that often are as exuberant as their maker, laced with delightfully unexpected bold color, pattern, trims and combinations of fabric, like casual fleece with silk and wool. The New York designer of haute couture made a daring segue to the masses two years ago with fashion for Target. So it came as no surprise when Target invited him to bring his stylish sizzle into the home this year.
FEATURES
By Sharon Overton and Sharon Overton,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | August 11, 1996
Once we were content to wear the occasional designer label on our T-shirts or jeans.Then we discovered the joy of sleeping on designer sheets.Now everything from soap dishes and cereal bowls to wall paint and mattress covers comes with a designer label. In the '90s, nesting has replaced social climbing, and haute couture has led to home couture. No longer are fashion designers content simply to fill our closets. They're out to fulfill our domestic fantasies as well.Do you long for a home with the patina of old money?
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Staff Writer | February 21, 1993
A growing interest?Amazingly enough, the earliest record of a garden layout we have is 4,000 years old. Found in the tomb of an Egyptian court official, it's a doll-size model made of wood and painted. The sycamore figs and some bunched papyrus canes are still recognizable.If you're a lover of gardens and this sort of historical detail fascinates you, a new book, "Gardening Through the Ages" (Simon & Schuster, $50) is a must-have. The author, Penelope Hobhouse, is a noted garden designer and authority on historic gardens.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | November 29, 1992
Designing women always have been a fixture of the fashion industry, from Coco Chanel to Donna Karan, but in the world of interiors, female names have not exactly been household words.It was in this environment that interior designer Bebe Winkler successfully but quietly plied her trade for nearly 25 years. Since she began decorating rooms in 1969, she has gathered a sophisticated, moneyed, international clientele and accolades for excellence in her profession. She has been widely published in home fashion magazines, including the prestigious Architectural Digest, as early as 1979, when just a handful of women had been featured.
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