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By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,sun reporter | July 3, 2007
The Baltimore County Council confirmed last night the nomination of the county's longtime budget director to his first full term overseeing the government's day-to-day operation - less than a week after misconduct allegations were raised against him by an ex-county employee. Fred J. Homan, who took over as acting county administrative officer in November, will receive a 23 percent raise as County Executive James T. Smith Jr.'s top appointee. Council members, who interviewed Homan last week, asked him no questions last night.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
A $21 million investment at the center of a legal debate in Baltimore County government was downgraded to junk status less than a month after the county purchased it in 2007, according to county documents. Details of the investment loss were included in a November 2007 letter sent to members of the former County Council and other county officials. The county is now considering suing Merrill Lynch, and has since stopped making similar investments. The letter, from County Administrative Officer Fred Homan, said the county bought commercial paper issued by Mainsail II LLC through Merrill Lynch on July 31, 2007.
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NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun Reporter | November 28, 2006
He has a reputation for being as disciplined with taxpayers' money as he is in his healthy diet and gym routine. All seem to agree that when it comes to knowledge of Baltimore County government, Fred Homan has no peer. Now that the longtime county budget director is about to take responsibility for the government's day-to-day operation, some joke that the only thing that will change is his job title, since he is already seen by many as the man who calls a lot of the shots. "Fred has his finger on every part of the county [government]
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2011
Baltimore County Administrative Officer Frederick J. Homan was injured Saturday while riding a horse on the NCR Trail, a police spokeswoman said. Homan suffered serious injuries and was taken to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, said Detective Cathy Batton, a police spokeswoman. She did not have an update on his condition Saturday night. Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. appointed Homan to the top position in 2007 after had served as director of the Office of Budget and Finance in 1989.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2003
With Baltimore County's administrative officer off to the Ehrlich administration this month and Executive James T. Smith Jr. not ready for a confirmation battle over his nominee for second-in-command, the task of running the government day to day has fallen to Fred Homan, the county's dour budget chief for the past 14 years. Some people see Homan as the driving force behind the county's ranking as one of the best-run municipal governments in America and its AAA bond ratings from all three major rating agencies.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 4, 1999
Baltimore County hopes to begin cashing in next fall on motorists who run red lights.With the county set to install video cameras at 35 intersections to capture red-light runners on tape, officials estimate that police will collect $4.8 million more in fines issued to motorists in the coming year.The cameras will be installed by next fall, and the budget estimate is based on a fine of $70 per ticket, said Baltimore County budget director Fred Homan, after a County Council briefing on the proposed $1.7 billion county budget.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1995
Because of sluggish revenue and predicted state and federal cuts, the Ruppersberger administration will present tonight an early retirement incentive plan for a group of Baltimore County government workers.The plan, which the administration hopes would attract about 150 takers, is designed to help gird against the possibility of layoffs, by saving up to $5.8 million in a year, while costing only about $1.2 million in extra pension benefits, county officials said.County departments must make do with less money next year than they have this year, budget director Fred Homan said, and the incentives would help cut payrolls.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON | February 19, 1995
Like a fiery-eyed biblical prophet, Baltimore County budget director Fred Homan is an intense man with a tough, self-assigned mission -- changing old political habits in spending public money.His target is the common practice of using one-time budget surpluses to pay for goodies that have long-term financial consequences. The favorites are cutting a few cents off the property tax rate, hiring new workers, giving county employees pay raises, or all three.To call the budget director intense about the subject "is almost an understatement," said freshman County Councilman Stephen G. "Sam" Moxley, who recently got the lecture.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1994
The idea of getting a small election-year property tax cut by taking money from Baltimore County's new rainy day surplus fund sparked a sharp exchange yesterday between Councilman Melvin G. Mintz and Budget Director Fred Homan.During a budget work session, Mr. Homan reacted angrily to Mr. Mintz's suggestion that the $2.9 million budget appropriation that Executive Roger B. Hayden wants to add to the county's surplus fund -- termed the Economic Stabilization Fund -- instead could be used to trim 2 cents off the county's property tax rate of $2.865 per $100 of assessed value.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | June 10, 1993
Baltimore County police briefly lost full use of their radi communications yesterday because of a delayed reaction from strong, predawn lightning storms, officials said.The problem began when lightning hit power lines, sending surges through two of the county's eight signal towers -- one at Red Run near Owings Mills and the other on Allender Road. The lightning also damaged a battery backup for the system in Allender Road, said Fred Homan, the county's budget director and the man in charge of its sophisticated 800 megahertz radio system.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,sun reporter | July 3, 2007
The Baltimore County Council confirmed last night the nomination of the county's longtime budget director to his first full term overseeing the government's day-to-day operation - less than a week after misconduct allegations were raised against him by an ex-county employee. Fred J. Homan, who took over as acting county administrative officer in November, will receive a 23 percent raise as County Executive James T. Smith Jr.'s top appointee. Council members, who interviewed Homan last week, asked him no questions last night.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun Reporter | November 28, 2006
He has a reputation for being as disciplined with taxpayers' money as he is in his healthy diet and gym routine. All seem to agree that when it comes to knowledge of Baltimore County government, Fred Homan has no peer. Now that the longtime county budget director is about to take responsibility for the government's day-to-day operation, some joke that the only thing that will change is his job title, since he is already seen by many as the man who calls a lot of the shots. "Fred has his finger on every part of the county [government]
NEWS
January 24, 2004
On January 22, 2004, MARY (MAY) HOMAN, peacefully passed away in LaCanada, CA at the home of her daughter Maureen, her son-in-law, Steve and her two grandsons, Michael and Marc, at the age of 84. After the loss of her husband George, who she lived with in Towson, MD for over 35 years, May moved to California two years ago to be with her daughter and family. Born Mary Theresa Griffiths in Bray County, Wicklow, Ireland on November 25, 1919, she immigrated to the United States with her husband George and her two children, Murray and Barry in 1949.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2003
With Baltimore County's administrative officer off to the Ehrlich administration this month and Executive James T. Smith Jr. not ready for a confirmation battle over his nominee for second-in-command, the task of running the government day to day has fallen to Fred Homan, the county's dour budget chief for the past 14 years. Some people see Homan as the driving force behind the county's ranking as one of the best-run municipal governments in America and its AAA bond ratings from all three major rating agencies.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2001
Sts. Peter & Paul is making the jump to the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association B Conference next spring, but the Sabres still had some unfinished business left in the C Conference. Chapelgate Christian, which went from 0-10 two seasons ago to the championship game yesterday, certainly didn't make it easy. It took a goal from Matt Benhoff with 2:59 left to give the top-seeded Sabres a 7-6 win and their second straight MIAA C Conference crown yesterday afternoon at Johns Hopkins' Homewood Field.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2000
Two Baltimore County councilmen say the county should consider allowing police officers to take their cruisers home - a proposal designed to help deter crime and attract recruits. But a new study recommending take-home cars has prompted criticism from county officials, who call it an inaccurate sales pitch for an unnecessary perk. The report by County Auditor Brian J. Rowe says that as many as 358 patrol officers who live in the county would be eligible for the program. It suggests that those who choose not to participate be given $3,500 a year instead.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | August 27, 1993
An larger-than-expected $6 million surplus from the fiscal year that ended June 30 has bolstered Baltimore County's year-old Rainy Day fund to $17.5 million, officials said yesterday.Budget Director Fred Homan said that $5 million of the unexpected money is from higher-than-expected income tax revenues, but he cautioned that it won't be clear until next month whether the $5 million represents a real increase in county income or is the result of an uneven distribution by state tax officials.
NEWS
By Ronnie Greene and Ronnie Greene,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1996
Waiving bid formalities for everything from the county executive's Jeep to bridge repairs to morale-boosting seminars, Baltimore County has spent nearly $17.7 million in no-bid contracts under Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger.A Sun review of 260 no-bid contracts found that the county waives bids more frequently than some neighboring counties, and that some contracts stretch the "emergency" and "sole source" guidelines used to waive such procedures.In the county, no-bid contracts are dubbed "red tag items."
NEWS
By Hal Piper and Hal Piper,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2000
Efforts to expand the Baltimore County Detention Center will advance next month when two contracts are presented for County Council approval but ground-breaking on the $30.5 million project is at least a year away, Fred Homan, county director of budget and finance, said yesterday. The contracts are for $312,000 with Gilbane Building Co., the project manager, and $1.6 million with the architectural firm of Daniel, Mann, Johnson and Mendenhall. Expansion of the detention center on Kenilworth Drive was packaged with other projects in Question C on Tuesday's ballot.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 4, 1999
Baltimore County hopes to begin cashing in next fall on motorists who run red lights.With the county set to install video cameras at 35 intersections to capture red-light runners on tape, officials estimate that police will collect $4.8 million more in fines issued to motorists in the coming year.The cameras will be installed by next fall, and the budget estimate is based on a fine of $70 per ticket, said Baltimore County budget director Fred Homan, after a County Council briefing on the proposed $1.7 billion county budget.
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