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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
When you own all of his movies, have tried growing a pencil mustache and have a pink flamingo in your yard, what else can you do to show your love for John Waters? Try a sweater by James Long. The young designer has just unveiled his collection highlighted by several pieces that give props to what must be one of his favorite directors. At men's fashion week in London, Long charmed fashionistas -- or perhaps puzzled them -- with several sweaters featuring the face of Divine, the drag queen made famous in some of Waters' movies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
Sixty-three years ago this week - at 9 p.m. Oct. 15, 1951 - TV viewers got their first look at a situation comedy on CBS that, in short order, would become part of the country's cultural DNA. The focal point of the show was the redheaded title character, Lucy Ricardo (even in black and white, you could somehow tell the color of her hair); her Cuban-born husband, Ricky, leader of a dance band at a New York club; and their best friends, Fred and Ethel Mertz, landlords of the brownstone apartment building on the Upper East Side where they all laughed, loved, fought and schemed.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee | September 28, 2011
Whenever Bart Scott's name surfaces, Terrell Suggs almost always speaks affectionately about his tutelage under Scott. So it shouldn't be a surprise that the Ravens outside linebacker paid homage to Scott, his former teammate who now plays for the New York Jets by wearing a t-shirt emblazoned with Scott's catchphrase “Can't Wait!” “We all know what it means,” Suggs said, opening his weekly briefing with the media on Wednesday. “I'm personally sending a message to my brother and former mentor, that I also 'can't wait.'” The purple t-shirt featured the words in big white letters with a gold chain wrapped around them.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
You've seen the photos and the crazy video . Maybe you even caught a glimpse of that poor, doomed steer prancing through the streets of Baltimore. Now the iconic image of a steer* walking under a sign for "Lake Trout Fried Chicken" can live on in your home. Former Baltimore resident Maya Livio posted the image to the indie designer site Society6 this afternoon. You can order wall hangings , tshirts , iPhone cases and even a shower curtain with the image.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2010
Folks impervious to the charms of vintage theater and film, immune to the allure of farce, or allergic to dry British wit and jolts of Monty Python-esque zaniness may find the fuss about "The 39 Steps" a puzzlement. Everyone else is apt to be swept along by the abundant humor and style of this ingenious show, which has settled into the Hippodrome for the last stop on a nearly year-long national tour. Taking as it starting point Alfred Hitchcock's clever 1935 film of the same name, "The 39 Steps," adapted by Patrick Barlow, adds up to more than homage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | October 21, 1994
At its best, "Dangerous Obsession" -- a British psychological thriller receiving its local debut at the Spotlighters -- is reminiscent of the work of Alfred Hitchcock.Not knife-in-the-shower or swarming-birds-style Hitchcock. Instead, it's an homage by playwright N. J. Crisp to the master's subtler, creepier films -- the ones in which the lives of ordinary people are suddenly turned upside down in a way that leaves them forever changed.Sally and Mark Driscoll are a well-to-do married couple leading a seemingly contented life.
SPORTS
September 18, 1998
Cubs: Reggie Jackson watched yesterday's game from the dugout seats behind home plate at San Diego. Jackson said he sat in his car at a grocery store to hear Sosa's final at-bat on the radio Wednesday night. "I took the day off to drive 150 miles to pay homage and shake the man's hand," said Jackson, who received a standing ovation when he was introduced in between innings.Padres: Catcher Greg Myers left in the top of the eighth with a bruised left thumb.Pub Date: 9/18/98
ENTERTAINMENT
By BRITTANY BAUHAUS | October 27, 2005
Legendary Grateful Dead guitarist Bob Weir and his newly formed group RatDog hit Rams Head Live on Wednesday night. Showcasing old talent mixed with new players, Weir and his band pay homage to Dead classics and play original bluesy tunes. Doors open at 7 p.m.; show starts at 9. The show, at 20 Market Place in Power Plant Live, is for ages 18 and older; those younger than 21 pay $3 extra at the door. Tickets are $33 in advance and $35 the day of the show. Ramsheadlive.com, or 410-244-1131.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | March 29, 2007
Ten performers somersaulted across the stage at this year's Academy Awards and somehow transformed themselves into a Volkswagen bus with three passengers inside - and a man running behind, trying to catch up. It was the iconic image from Little Miss Sunshine, one of the films under consideration for best picture. Later, the group formed into a gun in homage to The Departed. Not so exciting, perhaps - until the "gun," amazingly, fired a "bullet" that flew through the air and into the wings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2010
Alfred Hitchcock's "The 39 Steps" is as enjoyable today as it was 75 years ago — maybe even more so. Hitchcock's suspense timing hasn't lost its punch. His observations of a London music hall and the Scottish moors bristle with personality and atmosphere. In many ways, it's the perfect film to inspire a Hitchcock homage on stage. It's funny and exciting even when it strains plausibility. Best of all for the homage-makers, it's immediately recognizable as a "Hitchcock movie."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Owens and For the Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Maryland visual artists, craft artisans, designers and other creative types who live, work or study in the region will be spotlighted at Sunday's Art Outside. Festival-goers should expect entertainment, food trucks and other vendors, as well as family-oriented activities, including a performance by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's youth musicians, OrchKids. "I wanted to bring people together and have some place for the new, up-and-coming artists at Station North and artists from all over the state to show their stuff," said Barbara Shapiro, 79, a retired educator who is the founder of Art Outside.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
If walls could talk, Capt. John Steele, along with two others, would have a tale to tell about the home he built circa 1788 in the Fells Point neighborhood. In Baltimore Heritage's "Baltimore Building of the Week" series, John Breihan wrote about this shipbuilder's residence, citing its design "with the dormer windows and high-relief moldings characteristic of English Georgian architecture. It was lovingly restored and adapted for modern living by the Hepner family. " In 1967, the home's tale became that of Jean Hepner's transformation of a condemned and crumbling structure to a magnificent restoration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
Hey, wanna buy a Cronut? We're talking a real Cronut here, the original cream-filled, glazed cross between a croissant and doughnut that you can buy at only one place in the world: the Dominique Ansel Bakery, a French pastry shop in New York City 's SoHo neighborhood. The Ansel bakery doesn't ship Cronuts, and you'll have to get in line by 6:30 a.m. to get a shot at one - the maximum is two - of the 200 or so of the labor-intensive Cronuts that the small bakery churns out every day. Cronuts, which Ansel launched on May 10, are the pastry that ate Manhattan , and their fame keeps growing.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | May 6, 2013
A shave and a haircut of yesteryear cost the proverbial two bits, 25 cents. A shave alone at The Old Bank Barbers, a soon-to-open barber shop on The Avenue in Hampden, will cost $25. It won't be any old shave, though. Owner Daniel Wells promises an old-fashioned, full-face, straight-edge shave, complete with hot lather, in a leather chair with a headrest that leans back. "It's an old-school barber shop with the tile floors," said Wells, who hopes to open this month at 1100 W. 36th St., the former site of Sixteen Tons, a men's clothing store.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Prepare for the British Invasion. This one, however, will be of the floral, not musical, variety. The nearly 200-year-old Philadelphia Flower Show runs March 2-10 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. This year's theme is "Brilliant!" with exhibits focusing on the landscapes, culture and beauty of Great Britain. The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society , which sponsors the event, has teamed up with Britain's Royal Horticultural Society to bring British designers, experts and presentations to the show, including Mark Lane, the head gardener for Buckingham Palace.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Opera AACC is celebrating its 11th anniversary this month with a production of Andrew Lloyd Webber's "Jesus Christ Superstar," running Feb. 1-9 at Anne Arundel Community College's Robert Kauffman Theater at the Pascal Center for Performing Arts. Director Douglas Brandt Byerly, chairman of AACC's performing arts department, said he hopes the show reflects his admiration of Lloyd Webber's groundbreaking work, as well as his own appreciation of the production's three leading players: Emily Sergo as Mary Magdalene, Robert Bradley as Judas and Benjamin Lurye as Jesus.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | October 23, 2009
The Baltimore County Commission on Disabilities recognized those who have done work with and for people with disabilities at its 19th annual awards luncheon Wednesday in Hunt Valley. The 13 honorees included Cody Mulligan, a 9-year-old student who read his thank-you from his own notes in braille; Christine Bianco, an elementary school guidance counselor whose "Celebrating Differences Day" has become a model throughout the county; and Harry Keene, a developmentally disabled man who works full-time and lives on his own. "I hope people get another chance like I did," Keene said to a cheering audience of about 300. The commission paid homage to caregivers, such as Jim and Carole McBride, who have nurtured three young men with special needs into thriving young adults, and to the Men of Calvert Hall, who have completed numerous projects for Gallagher Services.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | May 24, 1993
Paris. -- There once was an interest to be served by Western intervention in Yugoslavia: a crucial interest -- but it was abandoned. That abandonment explains the rambling, acrimonious and indecisive debate about Bosnia going on today among the Western allies.The West's interest was to defend international law and a certain standard of international behavior in postwar Europe: the principle that ethnic and territorial grievances must be settled by negotiation, not aggressive war and ethnic purge.
NEWS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
Kayleen Reese walked slowly into the garden just beyond center field at Camden Yards on Saturday afternoon, attempting to explain to her son exactly who, and what, the statue in front of them represented. "His name was Earl Weaver, he was the Orioles manager," Reese, of Catonsville, told 6-year-old Hudson Reese. "He's the one we showed you in the YouTube videos. " It sunk in then to the boy that the bronzed figure next to the wreath of carnations and roses before him was a tribute to that crazy, white-haired baseball man on the computer that yelled and screamed at the umpires and kicked the infield dirt.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
When you own all of his movies, have tried growing a pencil mustache and have a pink flamingo in your yard, what else can you do to show your love for John Waters? Try a sweater by James Long. The young designer has just unveiled his collection highlighted by several pieces that give props to what must be one of his favorite directors. At men's fashion week in London, Long charmed fashionistas -- or perhaps puzzled them -- with several sweaters featuring the face of Divine, the drag queen made famous in some of Waters' movies.
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