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By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
Christmas Eve worshipers at Columbia's Village of Oakland Mills on Tuesday will do the interfaith shuffle: Catholics departing the sanctuary with their hymnals, white altar cloth, candles and crucifix; Protestants entering with their own hymnals, white cloth, candles and cross. Then Protestants out, Catholics back in. So the ritual dance swings on, decades after people of many faiths first gathered to worship under one roof at the Oakland Mills Interfaith Center and similar spots in other Columbia villages.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 23, 1995
A lady friend, who went to Seton High School in the 1960s, remembers a fine arts course where one of the nuns announced on a spring afternoon, "Today we'll be looking at paintings from the Renaissance period. There will be a few paintings where women are not fully clothed. Those of you who feel uncomfortable with this will be allowed to leave the room."We think tenderly of such overprotectiveness now and wish to make our own innocence retroactive. At Notre Dame Prep, we discover a little belatedly, they've been showing their young ladies a porno movie that disguises itself as a documentary.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1999
The State Board of Morticians has come up with guidelines on the proper way to spread cremated remains in the hopes of dissuading mourners who have been pouring ashes onto a private beach on the Chesapeake Bay and at other inappropriate final resting places. The board completed a pamphlet last week that is intended to be given to anyone considering cremation. The move was a reaction to complaints from residents of Venice on the Bay, an Anne Arundel County community with a bay view so stunning it almost seems an invitation to spend eternity there.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | September 25, 1991
"Woman Hollering Creek," by Sandra Cisneros, 165 pages, Random House, New York, N.Y., $18. THE WOMAN moving through the stories in "Woman Hollering Creek" like smoky incense, Sandra Cisneros, the author-creator, observes life with eyes as fresh and sharp as newly cut jalapeno peppers."My Lucy friend who smells like corn," she writes. It's the title of a story in this collection. Lucy who smells like corn has a cat-eye marble the color of "the yellow blood of butterflies."Salvador, the boy who is no one's friend in the small epiphany called "Salvador Late or Early," has "eyes the color of caterpillar."
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2012
On a day filled with sunshine, music and poetry, the prep school Yeardley Love attended reclaimed her name from the tragic headlines and put it back where she spent some of her happiest days: on a playing field. "Sports brought out so many of her memorable characteristics - her fun-loving personality, dedication, loyalty and compassion for others," Lexie Love said Sunday at Notre Dame Preparatory School in Towson, where a new turf field was dedicated to her sister. "I'm sure she's looking down on her field now with a big smile on her face and looking forward to seeing the many games played on it. " Several hundred people attended the dedication of the $1.2 million Yeardley Love Field, named for the Notre Dame Prep alum who was murdered in May 2010, just weeks before she would graduate from the University of Virginia.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | October 7, 1994
How many ministers does it take to bless one bathroom in a mission center? A dozen, all laughing."It's like a fraternity party," said one clergyman in a tight spot between a large old bathtub and the wall. "Let's see how many we can squeeze in."The pastors prayed, "Bathe us with your grace, that our lives may give witness to the goodness of your creation."Kathy Brown, director of the Shepherd's Staff mission for needy people, invited the ministers to join in the blessings for each room before the center reopened yesterday at its new location in Westminster.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | July 8, 2006
On July 7, 1806, a procession of priests and "junior ecclesiastics" led Bishop John Carroll of Baltimore to the southwestern corner of the hilltop plot that would be the site of America's first Catholic cathedral. Carroll sprinkled the first foundation stone with "blessed water," according to one account, while the assembled clergy repeated the 127th Psalm: "Unless the Lord build the house, they labor in vain that build it." They sang "Veni, Creator Spiritus," a hymn invoking the Holy Spirit.
NEWS
November 21, 2008
WASHINGTON - As Republicans sort out the reasons for their defeat, they likely will overlook or dismiss the gorilla in the pulpit. Three little letters, great big problem: G-O-D. I'm bathing in holy water as I type. To be more specific, the evangelical, right-wing branch of the GOP is what ails the erstwhile conservative party and will continue to afflict and marginalize its constituents if reckoning doesn't soon cometh. Simply put: Armband religion is killing the Republican Party. And the truth - as long as we're setting ourselves free - is that if one were to eavesdrop on private conversations among the party intelligentsia, one would hear precisely that.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2004
With their main sanctuary still off-limits yesterday - waterlogged and scarred by fire and smoke - members of Northwest Baptist Church crammed into a too-small space in their fellowship center and prayed. The room was sparse - with white folding chairs instead of pews, no organ, and small TV monitors in place of the giant screen used by the high-tech congregation to broadcast words of worship and song. But none of that seemed to faze those who came to the Reisterstown church to listen and sing and praise the good timing and small miracles they believed saved the church from burning to the ground after its steeple was struck by lightning Wednesday.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 20, 1998
MOSCOW -- Faith brought a thousand people to an old war monument here yesterday, faith in the redemptive power of a man who in life was loving, mild and inadequate.In death, the murdered Czar Nicholas II has become something else altogether. Above the priests and uniformed Cossacks and kerchiefed old women who came to mark his 130th birthday, the banners flapping in the warm breeze bore his likeness as if that of an icon."I think the czar fulfilled his mission, which was like Christ's," said Valentina Shatskaya.
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