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NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2004
With their main sanctuary still off-limits yesterday - waterlogged and scarred by fire and smoke - members of Northwest Baptist Church crammed into a too-small space in their fellowship center and prayed. The room was sparse - with white folding chairs instead of pews, no organ, and small TV monitors in place of the giant screen used by the high-tech congregation to broadcast words of worship and song. But none of that seemed to faze those who came to the Reisterstown church to listen and sing and praise the good timing and small miracles they believed saved the church from burning to the ground after its steeple was struck by lightning Wednesday.
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 20, 1998
MOSCOW -- Faith brought a thousand people to an old war monument here yesterday, faith in the redemptive power of a man who in life was loving, mild and inadequate.In death, the murdered Czar Nicholas II has become something else altogether. Above the priests and uniformed Cossacks and kerchiefed old women who came to mark his 130th birthday, the banners flapping in the warm breeze bore his likeness as if that of an icon."I think the czar fulfilled his mission, which was like Christ's," said Valentina Shatskaya.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 15, 2002
For movie lovers, there's no reason to see John Q. except during a fit of insomnia when it shows up on late-night cable. All that makes it bearable in the theater is the anger it sets off in the audience over America's medical mismanagement. Remember the crack about HMOs that brought down the house in As Good As It Gets? John Q. uses outrage over our health care system to fuel an entire two-hour hostage drama. The spluttering it rouses from insurance-burned viewers has far more vitality than the actual content of the movie.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 3, 2005
Summer has arrived in Annapolis: The U.S. Naval Academy has had its Commissioning Week and the Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre has started its season. This outdoor venue at 143 Compromise St., across from City Dock on the site of a colonial blacksmith's shop, is presenting the comedy Nunsense, written in 1984 by former Jesuit Dan Coggin. Coggin tells the hilarious tale of nuns who put on a show to raise funds to bury four of their colleagues temporarily stored in the freezer. Convent chef Sister Julia Child of God accidentally served a lethal soup that poisoned 52 nuns, but only 48 were buried before funds ran out. In Summer Garden's production, the nuns have been moved from their original convent in Hoboken, N.J., to Annapolis, where they are now known as "the Little Sisters of the Severn" with "Big Sisters of the Chesapeake Bay" aspirations.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | October 1, 2007
The two-hour Mass of Installation of Baltimore's new archbishop this afternoon will include long-standing traditions and symbols of the Catholic Church. Rituals for the service are spelled out in the Ceremonial of Bishops, a Vatican guide, said Monsignor Robert J. Jaskot, chancellor of the archdiocese, who is planning the installation of Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien. About 1,800 people are expected to attend. At 1:10 p.m., the ceremony will begin just inside the door of the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen in North Baltimore, where O'Brien will be greeted by the cathedral's rector, Monsignor Robert A. Armstrong.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | August 11, 1996
Today, you can insert a coin or card in the appropriate machine and get candy, gum, drinks, telephone service or even cash. The idea of a coin-operated machine has been around for quite some time, however.The first was used to dispense holy water in ancient Greece. In the 1850s, tobacco boxes were kept on tavern counters; the smoker inserted a coin and was able to fill his pipe with tobacco or buy a cigarette.Machines later dispensed stamps, gum and perfume. Fortune-telling, strength-testing, picture-show and gaming-skill machines soon followed.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
At St. Frances Academy in East Baltimore, the most ardent sports fan is the one on the bench in a black habit and veil. If the Panthers are playing, Sister John Francis Schilling, president of the East Baltimore school, is cheering. "She's like another coach or a general manager on the sidelines," said Mark Karcher, boys basketball coach. "If I have a bad game, she will get on me. " Sister Schilling also keeps the stats and writes a weekly blog detailing nuances of the games. "I keep record of the rebounds, assists, turnovers and steals," she said.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1997
The gleaming crucifix was back in its rightful place and memorial candles were burning yesterday as the faithful returned to St. Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic Church.The upper chapel of the downtown Baltimore parish had been closed for nearly five months as craftsmen plastered and painted the 156-year-old church. It was the final phase of a $1.2 million renovation that took a decade.During the transformation, a beloved skylight was restored, stained-glass windows were repaired and the pews were reconfigured to wrap around the altar.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | April 9, 2006
To the people who live in Annapolis, there's probably no such thing as too many trees. With almost 40 percent of the city covered by trees, Mayor Ellen O. Moyer and the Annapolis Department of Neighborhood and Environmental Programs are trying to ensure that the lush canopy is maintained - one tree at a time. To that end, city officials are planning several events this month in the run-up to National Arbor Day, April 28, when they will unveil a roof covered with greenery at Back Creek Nature Park on Edgewood Road.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | October 3, 1991
Building a ministry in SandtownA group of young white suburbanites came to West Baltimore's Sandtown area in 1988 to establish a Christian ministry called New Song Fellowship. One of the group's goals was to start a Habitat for Humanity housing program in the poor, predominantly black community.Three years later, the Sandtown Habitat for Humanity has rebuilt four vacant houses with volunteer labor and privately donated funding and materials, and then sold them at cost to local families. The monthly mortgage payment for each house is about $200.
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