Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHoly Water
IN THE NEWS

Holy Water

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
Volunteers built a modest chapel in a remote area of northeastern Maryland nearly 200 years ago and dedicated it to the patron saint of their homeland. Volunteers today have saved that simple frame building from ruin. Many descendants of those early settlers will gather at the fully restored St. Patrick's Chapel in Cecil County for a rededication Saturday. They will offer prayers of gratitude to their forebears and to those who have preserved their legacy. The 10 a.m. Mass in a hamlet known as Pilottown is expected to draw the great-grandchildren of the Irish immigrants who settled along the Susquehanna River in the early 19th century.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1998
In less time than it took to hear yesterday's Gospel, some Highlandtown churchgoers braided yellowish palm leaves into the little crosses they'll keep for the coming year -- part of a centuries-old tradition still carried on at Our Lady of Pompei Roman Catholic Church in the center of Highlandtown's Italian-American community.The most accomplished of these Palm-Sunday weavers can work their dextrous fingers to produce fantastic designs.It only happens on Palm Sunday, though, which initiates Holy Week, when Christians commemorate the day when the Gospel writers state that Jesus Christ entered Jerusalem in triumph as crowds waved palm fronds.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | October 7, 1994
How many ministers does it take to bless one bathroom in a mission center? A dozen, all laughing."It's like a fraternity party," said one clergyman in a tight spot between a large old bathtub and the wall. "Let's see how many we can squeeze in."The pastors prayed, "Bathe us with your grace, that our lives may give witness to the goodness of your creation."Kathy Brown, director of the Shepherd's Staff mission for needy people, invited the ministers to join in the blessings for each room before the center reopened yesterday at its new location in Westminster.
NEWS
November 21, 2008
WASHINGTON - As Republicans sort out the reasons for their defeat, they likely will overlook or dismiss the gorilla in the pulpit. Three little letters, great big problem: G-O-D. I'm bathing in holy water as I type. To be more specific, the evangelical, right-wing branch of the GOP is what ails the erstwhile conservative party and will continue to afflict and marginalize its constituents if reckoning doesn't soon cometh. Simply put: Armband religion is killing the Republican Party. And the truth - as long as we're setting ourselves free - is that if one were to eavesdrop on private conversations among the party intelligentsia, one would hear precisely that.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2004
With their main sanctuary still off-limits yesterday - waterlogged and scarred by fire and smoke - members of Northwest Baptist Church crammed into a too-small space in their fellowship center and prayed. The room was sparse - with white folding chairs instead of pews, no organ, and small TV monitors in place of the giant screen used by the high-tech congregation to broadcast words of worship and song. But none of that seemed to faze those who came to the Reisterstown church to listen and sing and praise the good timing and small miracles they believed saved the church from burning to the ground after its steeple was struck by lightning Wednesday.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 20, 1998
MOSCOW -- Faith brought a thousand people to an old war monument here yesterday, faith in the redemptive power of a man who in life was loving, mild and inadequate.In death, the murdered Czar Nicholas II has become something else altogether. Above the priests and uniformed Cossacks and kerchiefed old women who came to mark his 130th birthday, the banners flapping in the warm breeze bore his likeness as if that of an icon."I think the czar fulfilled his mission, which was like Christ's," said Valentina Shatskaya.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2004
For die-hard boccie players, winters in Baltimore have typically meant a gloomy hiatus from Little Italy's outdoor courts. What Baltimore lacked, many lamented, was an indoor boccie court - like the kinds some of the players had competed on in tournaments as far away as Canada. That all changed yesterday in the gymnasium of a church in Highlandtown. Including the Little Italy regulars and a foursome from Delaware, boccie players descended on Our Lady of Pompei Roman Catholic Church off Conkling Street for the opening - and blessing - of what organizers called the first regulation-size indoor court in Maryland.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | April 9, 2006
To the people who live in Annapolis, there's probably no such thing as too many trees. With almost 40 percent of the city covered by trees, Mayor Ellen O. Moyer and the Annapolis Department of Neighborhood and Environmental Programs are trying to ensure that the lush canopy is maintained - one tree at a time. To that end, city officials are planning several events this month in the run-up to National Arbor Day, April 28, when they will unveil a roof covered with greenery at Back Creek Nature Park on Edgewood Road.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 3, 2005
Summer has arrived in Annapolis: The U.S. Naval Academy has had its Commissioning Week and the Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre has started its season. This outdoor venue at 143 Compromise St., across from City Dock on the site of a colonial blacksmith's shop, is presenting the comedy Nunsense, written in 1984 by former Jesuit Dan Coggin. Coggin tells the hilarious tale of nuns who put on a show to raise funds to bury four of their colleagues temporarily stored in the freezer. Convent chef Sister Julia Child of God accidentally served a lethal soup that poisoned 52 nuns, but only 48 were buried before funds ran out. In Summer Garden's production, the nuns have been moved from their original convent in Hoboken, N.J., to Annapolis, where they are now known as "the Little Sisters of the Severn" with "Big Sisters of the Chesapeake Bay" aspirations.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1999
The state Board of Morticians wants to add a set of guidelines to its regulations in an attempt to stop people from using a private beach on the Chesapeake Bay to dispose of the ashes of loved ones.The board began contemplating guidelines on how to properly dispose of cremated remains last fall, after residents of a cozy Pasadena community as picturesque as its name -- Venice on the Bay -- began complaining about visitors scattering ashes from their beach.The board's guidelines remind people that even though the state does not require that cremated remains be placed in a cemetery, "this does not mean that cremated remains can be freely scattered or otherwise disposed of upon public domain, or upon the private property of another person."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.