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By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 3, 2005
Summer has arrived in Annapolis: The U.S. Naval Academy has had its Commissioning Week and the Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre has started its season. This outdoor venue at 143 Compromise St., across from City Dock on the site of a colonial blacksmith's shop, is presenting the comedy Nunsense, written in 1984 by former Jesuit Dan Coggin. Coggin tells the hilarious tale of nuns who put on a show to raise funds to bury four of their colleagues temporarily stored in the freezer. Convent chef Sister Julia Child of God accidentally served a lethal soup that poisoned 52 nuns, but only 48 were buried before funds ran out. In Summer Garden's production, the nuns have been moved from their original convent in Hoboken, N.J., to Annapolis, where they are now known as "the Little Sisters of the Severn" with "Big Sisters of the Chesapeake Bay" aspirations.
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NEWS
April 17, 2012
On Sunday, I attended mass with my 79-year-old grandmother. Two months ago, she lost her husband, my grandfather. Ever since that day, she could not have a more positive attitude about moving onward in her life. This strength she so fervently displays day to day, she wholeheartedly attributes to her faith. As her top admirer, and as someone who had considered herself a faithful Catholic for much of her life, I decided to begin attending church again to discover this unyielding faith my grandmother seems to possess.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | July 8, 2006
On July 7, 1806, a procession of priests and "junior ecclesiastics" led Bishop John Carroll of Baltimore to the southwestern corner of the hilltop plot that would be the site of America's first Catholic cathedral. Carroll sprinkled the first foundation stone with "blessed water," according to one account, while the assembled clergy repeated the 127th Psalm: "Unless the Lord build the house, they labor in vain that build it." They sang "Veni, Creator Spiritus," a hymn invoking the Holy Spirit.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1999
The state Board of Morticians wants to add a set of guidelines to its regulations in an attempt to stop people from using a private beach on the Chesapeake Bay to dispose of the ashes of loved ones.The board began contemplating guidelines on how to properly dispose of cremated remains last fall, after residents of a cozy Pasadena community as picturesque as its name -- Venice on the Bay -- began complaining about visitors scattering ashes from their beach.The board's guidelines remind people that even though the state does not require that cremated remains be placed in a cemetery, "this does not mean that cremated remains can be freely scattered or otherwise disposed of upon public domain, or upon the private property of another person."
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2004
With their main sanctuary still off-limits yesterday - waterlogged and scarred by fire and smoke - members of Northwest Baptist Church crammed into a too-small space in their fellowship center and prayed. The room was sparse - with white folding chairs instead of pews, no organ, and small TV monitors in place of the giant screen used by the high-tech congregation to broadcast words of worship and song. But none of that seemed to faze those who came to the Reisterstown church to listen and sing and praise the good timing and small miracles they believed saved the church from burning to the ground after its steeple was struck by lightning Wednesday.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 20, 1998
MOSCOW -- Faith brought a thousand people to an old war monument here yesterday, faith in the redemptive power of a man who in life was loving, mild and inadequate.In death, the murdered Czar Nicholas II has become something else altogether. Above the priests and uniformed Cossacks and kerchiefed old women who came to mark his 130th birthday, the banners flapping in the warm breeze bore his likeness as if that of an icon."I think the czar fulfilled his mission, which was like Christ's," said Valentina Shatskaya.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 15, 2002
For movie lovers, there's no reason to see John Q. except during a fit of insomnia when it shows up on late-night cable. All that makes it bearable in the theater is the anger it sets off in the audience over America's medical mismanagement. Remember the crack about HMOs that brought down the house in As Good As It Gets? John Q. uses outrage over our health care system to fuel an entire two-hour hostage drama. The spluttering it rouses from insurance-burned viewers has far more vitality than the actual content of the movie.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
At St. Frances Academy in East Baltimore, the most ardent sports fan is the one on the bench in a black habit and veil. If the Panthers are playing, Sister John Francis Schilling, president of the East Baltimore school, is cheering. "She's like another coach or a general manager on the sidelines," said Mark Karcher, boys basketball coach. "If I have a bad game, she will get on me. " Sister Schilling also keeps the stats and writes a weekly blog detailing nuances of the games. "I keep record of the rebounds, assists, turnovers and steals," she said.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Mary Gail Hare and Tom Pelton and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2005
Pierce John Flanigan Jr., former president of the construction company founded by his grandfather in 1885, died of an infection Friday at his home near Gibson Island. He was 93. A longtime resident of Baltimore and Anne Arundel County, Mr. Flanigan led the family-owned construction company, P. Flanigan and Sons Inc., and was a former president of the Maryland Highway Contractors Association. He also was a leader of efforts to help the poor and sick through Catholic service organizations.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | October 1, 2007
The two-hour Mass of Installation of Baltimore's new archbishop this afternoon will include long-standing traditions and symbols of the Catholic Church. Rituals for the service are spelled out in the Ceremonial of Bishops, a Vatican guide, said Monsignor Robert J. Jaskot, chancellor of the archdiocese, who is planning the installation of Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien. About 1,800 people are expected to attend. At 1:10 p.m., the ceremony will begin just inside the door of the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen in North Baltimore, where O'Brien will be greeted by the cathedral's rector, Monsignor Robert A. Armstrong.
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