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By DAN BERGER | June 13, 1994
If the U.S. trashes the U.N. embargo on arms for Bosnia, as the House commands, it better not expect anyone to comply with U.N. embargoes on North Korea or Iraq.The Holy Father will visit Oriole Park during the World Series to lead world prayer for Jeffrey Hammonds' speedy recovery.
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NEWS
By William E. Lori | September 29, 2013
There's no doubt about it, Pope Francis has captured the attention of the Catholic Church and the world. And he is doing this not only by a simplicity and humility that has earned him the nickname, "the world's parish priest" but also by taking the church back to the basics. Through his humble actions and kind words, the pope is reminding all Catholics - including us bishops - that our first priority is and must always be to know and love God the Father who has revealed his love through his Son Jesus Christ, a love that is communicated to us through the Holy Spirit.
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | October 11, 1995
Q. How do you top Cal? A. With the pope. Q. How do you top the Holy Father? A. ?A million black men are urged by Louis Farrakhan, Ben Chavis et al. to show their responsibility as fathers, providers and role models by taking a day off work and home to demonstrate in Washington.Bill wants to reduce official U.S. hostility to Cuba to mere Cold War levels, inspiring some people to call him soft on Fidel.4( Cheer up. The Yankees are out of it.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | September 16, 2006
Local and national Muslim leaders denounced yesterday a recent speech by Pope Benedict XVI that included a 14th-century reference describing the Prophet Muhammad's teachings as "evil and inhuman" and urged the pope to carry on the outreach of his predecessor. The Washington-based Council on American-Islamic Relations called for Muslim-Catholic dialogue and said it is seeking a meeting with the Vatican's Washington representative. "Let us all continue the interfaith efforts promoted by the late Pope John Paul II, who made great strides in bringing Muslims and Catholics together for the common good," the council said in a statement released yesterday.
NEWS
By Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke | January 29, 1995
"Crossing The Threshold of Hope," by John Paul II.A fascinating book by one of the most influential people in our time. I learned not only about what the Pope thinks, but how he thinks. It is with great respect that I note my disagreement with the Holy Father on some of his comments regarding public policy on reproductive right. Most of the book is devoted to exploring questions about the existence of God, the divinity of Jesus and the power of prayer. The reader from any religious perspective is likely to be powerfully affected by these views.
NEWS
By ROSEMARIE NASSIF | October 6, 1995
ONE OF MY favorite spiritual writers is St. Teresa of Avila, a Carmelite, who died in 1582. She describes prayer as ''looking at God looking at me.'' It strikes me that this is the goal of all spirituality -- whether Christian, Jew, Muslim or Buddhist -- to see our ourselves, others and our world with the eyes of God.There are a few extraordinary people whose very presence inspires us to see ourselves and our world as God sees us. I had my first opportunity to...
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | September 16, 2006
Local and national Muslim leaders denounced yesterday a recent speech by Pope Benedict XVI that included a 14th-century reference describing the Prophet Muhammad's teachings as "evil and inhuman" and urged the pope to carry on the outreach of his predecessor. The Washington-based Council on American-Islamic Relations called for Muslim-Catholic dialogue and said it is seeking a meeting with the Vatican's Washington representative. "Let us all continue the interfaith efforts promoted by the late Pope John Paul II, who made great strides in bringing Muslims and Catholics together for the common good," the council said in a statement released yesterday.
NEWS
By Stephen J. Stahley | September 28, 1995
As a fellow priest, I welcome Pope John Paul II to our country and our city. The fact that I am married, with a child and a secular job, in no way diminishes the bond of priestly fraternity that I share with the Holy Father. We were ordained to the same Catholic priesthood. The priesthood which, according to the ancient tradition of the church, is forever. That same priesthood, instituted by Jesus at the Last Supper, to preserve the memory of His loving presence among us in the Mass.Pride and gratitudeAlong with Catholics throughout the country, I will feel immense pride and deep gratitude when the pope celebrates the Mass at Oriole Park.
NEWS
April 9, 2005
Text of the homily read, in Italian, by Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, dean of the College of Cardinals, during the funeral Mass of Pope John Paul II. Translation provided by the Vatican: Follow me." The Risen Lord says these words to Peter. They are his last words to this disciple, chosen to shepherd his flock. "Follow me" - this lapidary saying of Christ can be taken as the key to understanding the message which comes to us from the life of our late beloved Pope John Paul II. Today we bury his remains in the earth as a seed of immortality - our hearts are full of sadness, yet at the same time of joyful hope and profound gratitude.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLLOVE and MICHAEL OLLOVE,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1995
Popes tend not to pop up much in these parts, so it's not surprising that there's been a certain amount of uneasiness among the local citizenry about how to conduct oneself in his presence. Who wants to be the one to blurt out an unfortunate "Hey, Hon" in front of a worldwide television audience, instantaneously transforming Charm City into Rubeville?Well, relax. According to the Rev. Michael White, program developer for the papal visit, local customs, common sense and everyday courtesy are usually enough to get through a pope visitation without an embarrassing faux pas. Father White also provided the following tips for the uninitiated:What do you call the pope in his presence?
NEWS
By Algerina Perna | April 14, 2005
WHEN TWO seemingly unrelated events converge, some call it coincidence. Perhaps. Ty Sigler believes it's no coincidence that he received a letter with a message from Pope John Paul II within half an hour after the pontiff died April 2. It contained a rosary blessed by the pope and a photograph with his name at the bottom. Mr. Sigler, 65, of Reisterstown, has been disabled since 1987 because of a car accident. He has liver cancer and heart problems. The Vatican letter dated March 18 was in response to a letter Mr. Sigler had mailed to the pope in late January.
NEWS
April 9, 2005
Text of the homily read, in Italian, by Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, dean of the College of Cardinals, during the funeral Mass of Pope John Paul II. Translation provided by the Vatican: Follow me." The Risen Lord says these words to Peter. They are his last words to this disciple, chosen to shepherd his flock. "Follow me" - this lapidary saying of Christ can be taken as the key to understanding the message which comes to us from the life of our late beloved Pope John Paul II. Today we bury his remains in the earth as a seed of immortality - our hearts are full of sadness, yet at the same time of joyful hope and profound gratitude.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 4, 2005
WADOWICE, Poland -- Pope John Paul II may have helped hasten the end of communism here, eased centuries of tensions between Catholics and Jews and campaigned for human rights. But to the people of Wadowice, all that mattered yesterday was that he was first and foremost a son of their city. Mayor Ewa Filipiak, signing the guestbook outside the church where Karol Wojtyla was baptized and received his first communion, tried to explain what the pope's death meant to this community of 20,000 people.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2005
The Vatican said today that Pope John Paul II's condition was very serious, hours after he suffered "cardiocirculatory collapse and shock." Vatican spokesman Joaquin Navarro-Valls said in a statement that the pope, who was being treated at the Vatican, was given cardio-respiratory assistance after his heart stopped yesterday afternoon. "This morning the condition of the Holy Father is very serious," the statement said. However, it said that the pope had participated in a 6 a.m. Mass today and that "the Holy Father is conscious, lucid, and serene."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Rutten and Tim Rutten,Los Angeles Times | January 25, 2004
A good Hollywood publicity campaign does not stumble over technicalities -- like the truth. Still, it takes a particular sort of chutzpah to put a phony quote in the mouth of Pope John Paul II. But according to the pontiff's longtime secretary and confidant, Archbishop Stanislaw Dziwicz, that is precisely what filmmaker Mel Gibson and his company have done as part of the run-up to next month's Ash Wednesday release of The Passion of the Christ. That film has been a continuing source of controversy, since Gibson adheres to a "traditionalist" sect that has broken with the Catholic Church over the reforms adopted since the Second Vatican Council, including abandonment of the Latin Mass and a complete rejection of any collective Jewish responsibility for the death of Christ, which is the foundation of Christian anti-Semitism.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 2002
ROME - As U.S. cardinals arrived here for meetings at the Vatican on clerical sex abuse, church officials continued to suggest that the future of Cardinal Bernard F. Law would be up for discussion. The meetings today and tomorrow will focus primarily on how to protect children from predatory priests, the officials said. The U.S. bishops are looking for guidance and Vatican support as they prepare to draft national protocols to prevent abuse, to be presented at their national June meeting in Dallas.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 26, 1996
A deadline approaches, so I gotta lead with this: Only one week left for the Renaissance Institute's big class project -- to collect cash register tapes from Giant, Safeway and Metro and redeem them for computers for the Baltimore public school with the greatest need. If you want to contribute, send your receipts to: Save the Tapes, Renaissance Institute, College of Notre Dame of Maryland, 4701 N. Charles St., Baltimore 21210-2476.This melon a winnerWhat we have next is, literally, a leftover from the pope's visit to Baltimore last October -- and a story that, once reported in This Just In, belongs in some archives of the weird.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 2002
ROME - As U.S. cardinals arrived here for meetings at the Vatican on clerical sex abuse, church officials continued to suggest that the future of Cardinal Bernard F. Law would be up for discussion. The meetings today and tomorrow will focus primarily on how to protect children from predatory priests, the officials said. The U.S. bishops are looking for guidance and Vatican support as they prepare to draft national protocols to prevent abuse, to be presented at their national June meeting in Dallas.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | October 15, 2001
Before launching a multimillion-dollar restoration of Baltimore's Basilica of the Assumption - the first Roman Catholic cathedral in the United States - sponsors want to make sure their project is endorsed at the highest possible level. So nearly a dozen representatives from the Archdiocese of Baltimore, including Cardinal William Keeler, have gathered in Rome this week with the goal of outlining their construction plans before Pope John Paul II. "We want to get the blessing of the Holy Father for this project and have him acknowledge the building's significance as an expression of religious freedom in America," said Robert J. Lancelotta Jr., executive director of the Basilica of the Assumption Historic Trust, the nonprofit organization leading the restoration effort.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 4, 2001
DAMASCUS, Syria - Pope John Paul II arrives on a four-day pilgrimage tomorrow in a land anxious to discard its rigid, insular image and display a rich treasury of religious and cultural traditions thousands of years old. Since the death in June of President Hafez el Assad, Syria has begun a difficult, painful transition from an economically backward police state to a modern nation with renewed pride in its heritage as a crossroads and cradle of civilizations....
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