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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 12, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- Kirstin Holum is an artist and an athlete. She uses paints and oils to create wonderful portraits. She laces up a pair of "clap skates" and winds around a speed skating oval in a battle against time.Her twin talents converged yesterday at the Winter Olympics.In the morning, the 17-year-old from Waukesha, Wis., received an e-mail, notifying her that she had been accepted next fall to attend the Maryland Institute of Art. With applications in at three other schools, Holum is still unsure of her autumn destination.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Binnie Ritchie Holum, a dancer, choreographer, playwright and actress who had been a co-founder of the Baltimore Women's Theatre Project , died Sept. 21 at her parents' home near Saranac Lake, N.Y., of a gioblastoma, an aggressive brain tumor. She was 64. "Her talent was just endless and she had more energy than three people combined," said Harvey M. Doster, her collaborator, who is director of the International Baccalaureate Theater Program at St. Timothy's School in Stevenson.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 20, 1998
The starring role in "Whose Life Is It Anyway?", Brian Clark's play about a quadriplegic patient, is a challenge for any actor. Immobilized in a hospital bed for the entire play, the performer must create the character solely through voice and facial expressions.So it is all the more interesting that at the Vagabond Players, the lead is being played by a performer who is primarily a dancer, Binnie Ritchie Holum. Perhaps the restrictions appealed to Holum, who often performs works with the opposite restrictions -- creating characters solely through movement, without a single spoken word.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 27, 2005
Suli Holum is playing dumb. To be specific, she's portraying the quintessential dim bulb in Garson Kanin's Born Yesterday at Washington's Arena Stage. At least that's how the character of Billie Dawn, the ex-chorus girl mistress of a racketeer, starts out. Then the racketeer hires a reporter to "smarten 'er up" so she won't embarrass him while he's trying to buy influence in Washington. After a little knowledge dawns on Billie, she outsmarts everyone. When Holum's mother, Binnie Ritchie Holum (a Washington-based actress, playwright and choreographer)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 3, 1998
"Furlough," the latest production by the Women's Project at Theatre Project, opens there tomorrow. The holiday-themed show is set in a bus station two days before Christmas.Nineteen actors, under the co-direction of Linda Chambers and Binnie Ritchie Holum, perform short plays by six local playwrights: Kathleen Barber, Barbara Gehring, Charlotte Sommers, Carol Weinberg and Chambers and Holum. Among the tantalizing titles - "The Indian Princess From Madrid," "Von Trapped" and "Claus & Effect."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 2000
BEIJING - A visiting U.S. official praised China yesterday for becoming "a major participant" in nonproliferation efforts in Asia and around the world but said two days of talks did not allay concerns about Chinese help for Pakistan's anti-ballistic missile program. Allegations of such aid to Pakistan, made by U.S. intelligence agencies, have complicated the passage by the Senate of normal trade status for China and are fueling the push for a Senate bill that singles out China for scrutiny and penalties if it exports advanced weapons technologies.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | May 22, 1993
Because of typographical errors, the following review is being reprinted from yesterday's editions.Although much of "Lucy Juice and Other Family Recipes" is about death, the opening image is of birth, and it's one of the most poignant in this latest movement theater work by Splitting Image Theatre Company.When we first see the show's two performers, Binnie Ritchie-Holum and Julie Herber-Dougherty, they lie curled together on the floor. Then they slowly separate, although Ritchie-Holum, as the mother, clings to her child as long aspossible.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | May 21, 1993
Although much of "Lucy Juice and Other Family Recipes" is about death, the opening image is of birth, and it's one of the most poignant in this latest movement theater work by Splitting Image Theatre Company.When we first see the show's two performers, Binnie Ritchie-Holum and Julie Herber-Dougherty, they lie curled together on the floor. Then they slowly separate, although Ritchie-Holum, as the mother, clings to her child as long aspossible.It is the type of evocative imagery that has become the trademark of this distinctive local troupe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 28, 1996
The Women's Project at Theatre Project is a new producing organization begun by Maravene Loeschke and Binnie Ritchie Holum to provide opportunities for Baltimore women theater artists who are, as Loeschke puts it, "beyond the ingenue." The first showcase of their work is being presented at the Theatre Project through Sunday and includes 10 short pieces ranging from a five-minute version of "Phaedre" to a woman's confrontation with a mirror as she ages.Show times at the Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St., are 8 p.m. today through Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2003
Guitar finesse In the past few years, Franco Platino has been making quite a name for himself in the world of classical guitar. The reasons are easy to hear. Platino, who studied with eminent guitarist Manuel Barrueco at the Peabody Conservatory, combines technical finesse with abundant musical sensitivity, talents that have earned him several competition victories. Well-received recordings and international touring have added to his growing reputation. Platino will be playing works by Scarlatti, Paganini, Villa-Lobos and others in a recital presented by Candlelight Concerts at 8 p.m. Saturday at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre in Columbia.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 11, 2005
Born Yesterday was Garson Kanin's first play, and six decades later the ending seems more like a civics lesson, but it's a civics lesson that's still pertinent in Washington. Though Kanin's comedy is set in 1945, its message about the dangers of big business influencing government comes across with hit-you-over-the-head relevance in director Kyle Donnelly's sturdy production at Washington's Arena Stage. It's an enjoyable reheating of an old comic chestnut with a vibrant performance by lead actress Suli Holum, a Baltimore School for the Arts grad.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | June 2, 2005
`Suddenly Last Summer' Tennessee Williams' 1957 play, Suddenly Last Summer, directed by Barry Bach, wraps up the season at the Vagabond Players. Set in 1930s New Orleans, the drama focuses on a wealthy widow named Mrs. Venable, who is determined to conceal the circumstances of her son's death, and on the niece whose recollections she'd like to expunge. The Vagabonds' production, which opens tomorrow, stars Binnie Ritchie Holum as Mrs. Venable, Laurel Peyrot as her niece, Catherine, and Mark MacAluso as the doctor Mrs. Venable hopes will erase Catherine's memory.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | July 22, 2004
For all of the wizard Prospero's sweeping, sky-colored robe, his magic wand and book of spells, the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival production of The Tempest is fatally short on sorcery - especially the garden-variety sort that can keep an audience spellbound through five acts. Instead, audience members may feel as though they are visiting the Land of Tiny Emotions. Everything is remote, encapsulated, cut off. Instead of a gale of epic proportions, director Laura Hackman gives us a drizzle.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 15, 2003
There's a scene in Margaret Edson's 1999 Pulitzer Prize-winning play Wit in which a professor vehemently defends the use of a modest comma over a "hysterical" semicolon in the last line of the John Donne sonnet beginning, "Death be not proud." When punctuated properly, "Nothing but a breath - a comma - separates life from life everlasting," she explains. This may sound like nitpicking, but that comma, that breath, is the brief space in which Wit takes place. The play is an account of the valiant but futile battle waged by Vivian Bearing, a world-class John Donne scholar, against stage four metastatic ovarian cancer; there is no stage five, as she matter-of-factly informs us. Dedicated to literary research, Vivian now becomes equally dedicated to being a medical guinea pig. But as she discovers, studying and being studied are very different pursuits.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 2000
BEIJING - A visiting U.S. official praised China yesterday for becoming "a major participant" in nonproliferation efforts in Asia and around the world but said two days of talks did not allay concerns about Chinese help for Pakistan's anti-ballistic missile program. Allegations of such aid to Pakistan, made by U.S. intelligence agencies, have complicated the passage by the Senate of normal trade status for China and are fueling the push for a Senate bill that singles out China for scrutiny and penalties if it exports advanced weapons technologies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 30, 1999
Although area audiences may know Binnie Ritchie Holum primarily as a dancer, in 1998 she gave a moving portrayal of the lead character in the Vagabond Players' production of Brian Clark's "Whose Life Is It Anyway?" Now she's back at the Vagabonds, this time playing the title role in Willy Russell's one-woman show "Shirley Valentine."Carol Mason directs this account of a repressed, middle-aged British housewife whose life is forever changed by a vacation to Greece."Shirley Valentine" continues through Oct. 17 at the Vagabonds, 806 S. Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 27, 2005
Suli Holum is playing dumb. To be specific, she's portraying the quintessential dim bulb in Garson Kanin's Born Yesterday at Washington's Arena Stage. At least that's how the character of Billie Dawn, the ex-chorus girl mistress of a racketeer, starts out. Then the racketeer hires a reporter to "smarten 'er up" so she won't embarrass him while he's trying to buy influence in Washington. After a little knowledge dawns on Billie, she outsmarts everyone. When Holum's mother, Binnie Ritchie Holum (a Washington-based actress, playwright and choreographer)
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | July 1, 1993
CAESAREA, Israel -- Stare for long at the blue sea here with Kenneth Holum, and you will find yourself in the past.The University of Maryland professor will take you back 1,600 years, back to a great city on the eastern shore of the Mediterranean, an important outpost of the Roman Empire. This is Caesarea, pride of Herod the Great, provincial capital for the Holy Land.In A.D. 400 -- four centuries after Herod built it -- the city is comparatively quiet. It is no longer vogue to throw Christians to the lions in the amphitheater, and the sweeping invasion by Muslims -- and brutal reprisals of the Crusaders -- are yet to engulf the city.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 10, 1998
If you've ever boarded the wrong bus, you have an idea of the feeling that dogs much of "Furlough," the latest production by the Women's Project at Theatre Project.Last season, this local consortium of female theater artists used a similar concept in their production of "Reservations." They took a collection of short plays and gave them a central, unifying theme by setting them in a restaurant. The idea worked pretty well the first time around, but with"Furlough," which sets seven playlets in a bus station just before Christmas, the effort seems forced.
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