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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2010
Despite open questions before the state's Court of Special Appeals, dates were set Thursday in the trial of Baltimore Councilwoman Helen L. Holton on charges of campaign-finance violations. Baltimore Councilwoman Helen L. Holton campaign finance violations trial sweeney bribery appeals special Despite appeal efforts, dates were set Thursday for the campaign finance violations trial of Baltimore Councilwoman Helen L. Holton. Judge Dennis M. Sweeney plans to hear the case Oct. 5 through Oct. 8 in Baltimore City Circuit Court.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
Opposition is mounting on the City Council against Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's latest sweeping pension change, which would switch new city employees from a traditional pension system to a 401(k)-style plan. City Councilwoman Helen Holton, chair of the budget committee, has introduced an alternative plan that would allow workers who make less than $40,000 - more than 70 percent of all municipal employees -- to keep a traditional pension. The alternative plan, which would require new workers to pay 5 percent of their salaries into the pension fund, would save the city $43 million over 10 years in upfront costs, according to Dan Doonan, an economist for the international union that represents many city workers.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | October 9, 2009
Baltimore City Councilwoman Helen L. Holton's on-again, off-again criminal trial is back on, after a judge's ruling that portends a steady flow of court action in the City Hall corruption case through the remainder of the year. A Circuit Court judge ruled Thursday that campaign finance charges against Holton should stand, meaning her trial will go forward Dec. 7. It marked the second time this week that Judge Dennis M. Sweeney, who is overseeing four City Hall corruption cases brought by the state prosecutor, slapped down defense arguments.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young on Thursday requested several city agencies prepare reports about a zoning bill introduced to the council this week that would allow a former Catholic school to be turned into a convalescent home for homeless people. Project PLASE (People Lacking Ample Shelter and Employment), a 30-year-old nonprofit headquartered in Charles North, has offered $1.4 million for the former St. Joseph's Monastery school buildings in the 3500 block of Old Frederick Road in Southwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | July 1, 2010
The state's second-highest court has upheld the dismissal of several bribery charges against City Councilwoman Helen L. Holton, another setback for the state's challenge to a year-old decision that many charges against Holton were barred by laws that protect legislators from punishment for their official actions. "Local legislators constitute the most direct form of representative democracy. They are the closest to the people and they often set the policies that most directly affect the health, safety and quality of life of the people residing in their communities," the 53-page decision released Thursday by the Court of Special Appeals reads.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2010
Prosecutors argued Wednesday before Maryland's second-highest court that bribery charges against Baltimore Councilwoman Helen L. Holton should be reinstated, contending that a lower court judge erred in barring the introduction of her votes on tax breaks for developers. The arguments in front of the Court of Special Appeals were the most recent chapter in Holton's lengthy legal battle on charges of bribery and a campaign finance violation. Holton, chairwoman of the council's powerful Taxation and Finance Committee, was accused of receiving donations for a political poll from two Baltimore business leaders whose project received a tax break from her committee.
NEWS
January 5, 2004
On January 1, 2004, KEITH HOLTON "LITTLE or SHORTY", beloved member of the Harps and Holton families; resident of Lexington, SC, died in Baltimore, where he was raised and spent most of his adult life. He is survived by a loving family and many friends. Family will receive friends at the Joseph H. Brown Jr., Funeral Home, 2140 N. Fulton Ave., Balto, Md 21217 , at 6:30 P. M. on Wednesday, January 7, 2004.
NEWS
July 8, 2005
On July 6, 2005 HENRY L. HOLTON beloved husband of Lena M. Holton (nee Dudeck) and devoted father of Bonnie Dowell, Carol Halstead and Henry L. Holton, Jr. (Larry). Also survived by grandchildren Christopher Dowell, Michael Palmer and Jill Shannon and four great-grandchildren.Funeral Services at the Connelly Funeral Home of Essex, 300 Mace Avenue on Monday, July 11 at 1 p.m. Interment Oak Lawn Cemetery. Visiting hours on Saturday and Sunday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | January 23, 2009
Baltimore City Councilwoman Helen L. Holton participated in hearings of a City Council finance committee, voting twice yesterday to sell city land, despite having been indicted this month for accepting a bribe from a developer who sought tax breaks from that committee. City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake stripped Holton of her leadership position on the Taxation, Finance and Economic Development Committee on Jan. 8, the day after she was indicted. Based on an e-mail from the council president's office, The Baltimore Sun reported that Holton had been removed from the committee outright.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | October 8, 2009
Baltimore City Councilwoman Helen L. Holton appeared in Circuit Court on Wednesday to listen as her defense attorneys argued that the campaign finance charges against her should be dropped. Holton, a deacon, clutched what appeared to be a Bible and sat with family members during the 90-minute hearing. She declined to comment afterward. The West Baltimore councilwoman is charged with conspiracy to violate campaign limits by requesting that developers John Paterakis and Ronald H. Lipscomb fund a $12,500 poll for her re-election campaign.
NEWS
By Lynn McLain | September 28, 2011
When one of Charles Dickens' characters said, "The law is an ass," he could easily have been referring to the recent Maryland Court of Appeals decision that makes it practically impossible for the state to prosecute legislators for taking bribes - unless, perhaps, they are caught on video or with a wired informant. Instead of taking the opportunity to put teeth in the state bribery law, the Court of Appeals affirmed the dismissal of the indictment against Baltimore City Councilwoman Helen B. Holton on the grounds of "legislative privilege.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2011
City Councilwoman Helen Holton's three-year battle against allegations of bribery and perjury came to a close Wednesday as Maryland's highest court upheld a Baltimore judge's decision to dismiss the most serious charges against her. The 5-2 ruling Wednesday ends the case against the West Baltimore Democrat, whom state prosecutors had accused of accepting $12,500 for a campaign poll from a pair of developers in exchange for voting on tax breaks for...
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
Local legislators' votes can be used as evidence against them in criminal cases, state prosecutors argued Thursday before Maryland's highest court in an effort to revive corruption charges against a Baltimore councilwoman. But lawyers for Councilwoman Helen L. Holton said the court cannot force her to defend her votes, following accusations that she accepted cash from city developers in return for approving public subsidies for their Harbor East project. Holton, who represents Southwest Baltimore, helped orchestrate the subsidies in 2007 and voted for them while head of the taxation and finance committee.
SPORTS
By Mike Frainie, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
If you ask the girls on the Bryn Mawr hockey team, they'd tell you that playing Holton-Arms is the only game that matters. The fact that Thursday's game was for the Maryland Scholastic Hockey League title just made it mean that much more. Unfortunately for the Mawrtians (10-3), they needed a little more. Defending champion Bryn Mawr took a one-goal lead early in the third period but couldn't hold it en route to a 3-2 loss to the Panthers at the Gardens Ice House in Laurel. Blair Greenwald scored two goals — the tying goal and the game-winner — to lead Bethesda's Holton Arms (10-7)
SPORTS
By Nelson Coffin, Towson Times | November 29, 2010
The Mawrtians are on a mission. Bryn Mawr's ice hockey team, after finally getting over the hump against The Holton-Arms School of Bethesda in the Maryland Scholastic Hockey League finale last winter, won't be satisfied with just one addition to its trophy case. To that end, the Mawrtians will be able to size up their main MSHL rival when they collide with the Panthers for the first of three encounters Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at Patterson Park. And with a slew of seniors returning for a repeat bid, they are very serious about the chance of its happening.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2010
State Sen. Catherine Pugh founded the Baltimore Running Festival a decade ago and has remained involved with the event ever since. So it should have been no surprise that she'd show up last week at a news conference to promote the marathon at Under Armour's corporate headquarters. But it sounds as if her appearance did not go over well with the mayor's office. A source who was there tells me that Renee Samuels , a special assistant to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake , asked Pugh to leave before the event got under way. Pugh not only ignored the request, I'm told, but had a chair brought forward so she could sit with race organizers and other dignitaries at the front of the room.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2010
City Councilwoman Helen L. Holton stepped out of chambers for a quick break on a recent afternoon, and a passel of lobbyists rushed along behind, seeking a moment of her time. Union leaders, store owners, Baltimore officials — it seems everyone wants to bend Holton's ear this spring. As chairwoman of the council's Taxation and Finance Committee, Holton plays a central role in the two most pressing issues facing city government: closing a wide budget gap and fixing the public safety pension plan without bankrupting the city, triggering a federal lawsuit or prompting the departure of droves of firefighters and police.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2010
The woman with gray hair piled high on her head perched on a stool in front of rows of college seniors scribbling notes. The students had many questions: How could recent graduates adhere to their values as they took their first jobs? Do leaders of other cities struggle with ethics as much as Baltimore's politicians do? And did Councilwoman Helen L. Holton believe she could restore faith in city government when charges were still pending against her in court? Two weeks after pleading no contest to a campaign finance violation, Holton addressed Loyola University students as part of a panel discussion, "Restoring Public Trust in City Hall.
NEWS
October 12, 2010
At a time when many news media rely on scandal and sensationalism to remain profitable, I rely on your newspaper for honest and unbiased reporting of facts with respect to news about government and government officials. Against this standard, I believe that The Baltimore Sun has tended to fail its readers with respect to its reporting during recent months on City Councilwoman Helen Holton in at least three respects. First, it has repeatedly linked various criminal charges against Councilwoman Holton with the very separate charges lodged against former Mayor Sheila Dixon, despite the fact that no connection is known to exist between the two cases.
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