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SPORTS
By Chris Korman | January 29, 2013
In a story that includes the phrase "he asks between squirts of deer antler," Sports Illustrated brings the fascinating story of two men aggressively marketing a line of health care supplements -- hologram stickers, the aforementioned deer antler spray, powders, underwear drenched in liquid (seriously) -- to college and pro athletes. The company's name explains the concept: S.W.A.T.S., which stands for Sports with Alternatives to Steroids. At the center of the story is none other than Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis, who is in New Orleans preparing to play the final game of his NFL career on Sunday.
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SPORTS
By Chris Korman | January 29, 2013
In a story that includes the phrase "he asks between squirts of deer antler," Sports Illustrated brings the fascinating story of two men aggressively marketing a line of health care supplements -- hologram stickers, the aforementioned deer antler spray, powders, underwear drenched in liquid (seriously) -- to college and pro athletes. The company's name explains the concept: S.W.A.T.S., which stands for Sports with Alternatives to Steroids. At the center of the story is none other than Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis, who is in New Orleans preparing to play the final game of his NFL career on Sunday.
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SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | February 12, 1995
Some people collect media guides. The Milwaukee Bucks don't cater to them. They don't sell old media guides, keeping them only for reference.Publicity director Bill King II says he was just trying to do something to liven up the cover of this season's media guide. He never realized that a hologram on the cover would attract collectors as well as the book's usual buyers, statistics fans.King is a longtime collector who began with baseball cards in the early '60s. But, although he worked with Upper Deck on the cover, he wasn't designing a collectible.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to Baltimoresun.com | March 8, 2004
What do a "Finding Nemo" DVD, a LeBron James basketball jersey, a package of Viagra and a ticket to this summer's Olympic Games in Athens all have in common? They all contain holograms produced by OpSec Brand Protection, a Parkton-based provider of security and authentication technologies worldwide. The firm's products are used in efforts to stump counterfeiters and prevent package-tampering. But don't let that tiny piece of intricately designed foil on a "Lord of the Rings" video game box fool you. It's not what you might think.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | August 16, 1992
This is not a restaurant review.Some of the most engaging collectibles of the summer are Denny's Grand Slam holograms. The easiest way to get them is to go to Denny's and order the qualifying Grand Slam meal. Your hologram is free for the price of your meal.That's a lot of eating out if you want the whole 26-card set. Of course, if you don't enjoy the chal- Notebooklenge of assembling the set -- or Denny's food -- you'll have to do your hunting in the secondary market. And you won't get any food.
SPORTS
November 1, 1992
Upper Deck goes minor-league with a 330-card set and 26-card Players of the Year insert set. Top players from all levels of the minors are featured. Backs rate players in five skill categories at current and projected peak levels, thanks to Baseball America. There is also a nine-card hologram insert set.
NEWS
By Houston Chronicle | April 15, 1993
The U.S. State Department is bringing a little color into your life. Beginning this week, all new American passports will turn from blue to green.The change is part of the State Department's efforts to discourage counterfeiters, said Gary Sheaffer of the agency's Bureau of Consular Affairs in Washington. The changes are taking place nationwide.Mr. Sheaffer said that passport design is periodically upgraded to incorporate new technologies that discourage counterfeiters and forgers."This passport has some very nice features,," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ian Austen and Ian Austen,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 26, 2001
For all of their digital sophistication, CD-ROMs, hard drives, DVDs and all other computer storage media share one trait with the tin-foil cylinder that Thomas Edison first used to capture his recitation of "Mary Had a Little Lamb." Those devices all use only their surfaces to record information. So it's not surprising that holography, with its ability to create and store images in three dimensions, has long been seen as a way to create high-capacity, but physically compact, systems for digital storage.
NEWS
By Tom Jehn | January 21, 2004
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - Am I the only one unimpressed by the NASA robot Spirit? I know it's something of a miracle that it traveled 300 million miles, survived its descent through the Martian atmosphere and now roves on the planet's inhospitable surface. But you have to remember, the news that Spirit is lumbering 65 feet a day isn't much of a match for the stunning fantasies of technological wizardry that sci-fi movies have dazzled us with for decades. Of course, I know NASA is light years away from spacecraft moving at "warp drive" and from boasting a range of on-board services, such as a holodeck lounge serving hologram drinks - just as kids know that when they play Nintendo, their gigantic intergalactic fighters with cloaking shields aren't actually rolling off the assembly lines at Boeing and Lockheed Martin.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1997
Maryland's judges put on 3-D glasses yesterday for a light-hearted look at future justice -- and it came flying at them in an orange hologram.The judges, meeting as part of a two-day annual Maryland Judicial Conference at the Sheraton Baltimore North in Towson, used the glasses to watch the conclusion of a mock trial deciding whether lawyers should be allowed to use computer enhanced photographs, videos and holograms to sway juries."
NEWS
By Tom Jehn | January 21, 2004
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - Am I the only one unimpressed by the NASA robot Spirit? I know it's something of a miracle that it traveled 300 million miles, survived its descent through the Martian atmosphere and now roves on the planet's inhospitable surface. But you have to remember, the news that Spirit is lumbering 65 feet a day isn't much of a match for the stunning fantasies of technological wizardry that sci-fi movies have dazzled us with for decades. Of course, I know NASA is light years away from spacecraft moving at "warp drive" and from boasting a range of on-board services, such as a holodeck lounge serving hologram drinks - just as kids know that when they play Nintendo, their gigantic intergalactic fighters with cloaking shields aren't actually rolling off the assembly lines at Boeing and Lockheed Martin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ian Austen and Ian Austen,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 26, 2001
For all of their digital sophistication, CD-ROMs, hard drives, DVDs and all other computer storage media share one trait with the tin-foil cylinder that Thomas Edison first used to capture his recitation of "Mary Had a Little Lamb." Those devices all use only their surfaces to record information. So it's not surprising that holography, with its ability to create and store images in three dimensions, has long been seen as a way to create high-capacity, but physically compact, systems for digital storage.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1997
For a chance to view the human body in a way unlike they had ever seen, Anitha Papudesi and Lillian Ponte took a quick detour on their way out of Baltimore to stop by the Maryland Science Center."
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1997
Maryland's judges put on 3-D glasses yesterday for a light-hearted look at future justice -- and it came flying at them in an orange hologram.The judges, meeting as part of a two-day annual Maryland Judicial Conference at the Sheraton Baltimore North in Towson, used the glasses to watch the conclusion of a mock trial deciding whether lawyers should be allowed to use computer enhanced photographs, videos and holograms to sway juries."
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1995
The Power Plant, Baltimore's shuttered behemoth, would come alive again with attractions such as simulated trips to Europe, virtual reality games or high-tech theaters under proposals before the city's economic development agency.Baltimore Development Corp. officials yesterday began combing through three detailed plans to revive the complex, and all of them blend state-of-the-art technology with more traditional draws, such as restaurants, clubs and theaters.Leslie Howard, the BDC development director, said the three proposals -- one from a London-based company and the others from Baltimore developers -- had considerable merit and, unlike many previous proposals, appeared to include solid financial backing.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | February 12, 1995
Some people collect media guides. The Milwaukee Bucks don't cater to them. They don't sell old media guides, keeping them only for reference.Publicity director Bill King II says he was just trying to do something to liven up the cover of this season's media guide. He never realized that a hologram on the cover would attract collectors as well as the book's usual buyers, statistics fans.King is a longtime collector who began with baseball cards in the early '60s. But, although he worked with Upper Deck on the cover, he wasn't designing a collectible.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to Baltimoresun.com | March 8, 2004
What do a "Finding Nemo" DVD, a LeBron James basketball jersey, a package of Viagra and a ticket to this summer's Olympic Games in Athens all have in common? They all contain holograms produced by OpSec Brand Protection, a Parkton-based provider of security and authentication technologies worldwide. The firm's products are used in efforts to stump counterfeiters and prevent package-tampering. But don't let that tiny piece of intricately designed foil on a "Lord of the Rings" video game box fool you. It's not what you might think.
FEATURES
By Ray Frager and Ray Frager,Staff Writer | November 4, 1992
No sense fighting it. As The Boss would say: 57 channels and the election's on. There's nothing else to do, so let's rock around the clock with the election on television:8:18 a.m. I certainly hope NBC pays overtime. There's Bryant Gumbel on "The Today Show," and he's going to have to work tonight, too. No wonder Jane Pauley left "Today." There she was, putting in those long hours, while her husband was home all day, drawing cartoons. I bet he never even emptied the dishwasher.8:19 a.m. On "Good Morning America," Joan Lunden is talking to a veterinarian who's patting a horse on the neck.
NEWS
By Houston Chronicle | April 15, 1993
The U.S. State Department is bringing a little color into your life. Beginning this week, all new American passports will turn from blue to green.The change is part of the State Department's efforts to discourage counterfeiters, said Gary Sheaffer of the agency's Bureau of Consular Affairs in Washington. The changes are taking place nationwide.Mr. Sheaffer said that passport design is periodically upgraded to incorporate new technologies that discourage counterfeiters and forgers."This passport has some very nice features,," he said.
FEATURES
By Ray Frager and Ray Frager,Staff Writer | November 4, 1992
No sense fighting it. As The Boss would say: 57 channels and the election's on. There's nothing else to do, so let's rock around the clock with the election on television:8:18 a.m. I certainly hope NBC pays overtime. There's Bryant Gumbel on "The Today Show," and he's going to have to work tonight, too. No wonder Jane Pauley left "Today." There she was, putting in those long hours, while her husband was home all day, drawing cartoons. I bet he never even emptied the dishwasher.8:19 a.m. On "Good Morning America," Joan Lunden is talking to a veterinarian who's patting a horse on the neck.
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