Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHolocaust
IN THE NEWS

Holocaust

ENTERTAINMENT
By Dorothea Straus and By Dorothea Straus,Special to the Sun | December 16, 2001
Still Alive: A Holocaust Girlhood, by Ruth Kluger. The Feminist Press of the City of New York. 213 pages. $24.95. This Holocaust memoir is a latecomer to the United States, despite its renown abroad and the prestige of international prizes. Countless other such memoirs, museum exhibitions, ceremonies, and films have preceded its arrival here, yet Still Alive is able to make Hitler's death camps present, as a new and shocking event. The passage of time has paled the atrocities and the young remain in semi-ignorance.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2010
Shanlei Cardwell could not fathom why so many people had wanted to kill the engaging old man standing before her. Meredith O'Connell laughed at his jokes and wondered how he had the spirit to tell them after all he'd endured. Both teenagers sensed that they'd be talking about Leo Bretholz for decades to come, that they would take on a small part of the quest that has driven him for almost 50 years. For all that time, Bretholz has crisscrossed the Baltimore area telling his harrowing tale of eluding capture and death as an Austrian Jew living in Europe through the Holocaust.
NEWS
By Matthew Kasper and Matthew Kasper,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 20, 2005
"Do you know what repressed memory means?" World War II veteran Preston Daisey asked the crowd of about 200 John Carroll School seniors, faculty and guests in the school auditorium Tuesday morning. Before anyone could answer, he said, "There's no repressed memory for me." Daisey, an 82-year-old former U.S. Army soldier from Towson, was one of 12 people asked to speak about their experiences with the Holocaust. The program was part of a 12th-grade project on the Holocaust and genocide organized by John Carroll English teacher Louise Geczy.
NEWS
By George F. Will | June 18, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Without an intellectual anchor, cultural institutions are carried along by prevailing intellectual winds, which blow from the left. Familiar exhibits of this process are universities, where various subjects are enveloped in fogs of politics and abstractions.But now the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and the problematic academic field of "Holocaust studies" are illustrating this process. The Holocaust is being exploited by academic entrepreneurs and factions with political agendas, all working to blur what the museum exists to insist upon -- the distinctiveness of the calamity that befell European Jewry.
FEATURES
By David Filipov and David Filipov,Boston Globe | September 19, 1994
Yury Krylov had sat down to watch "Schindler's List" expecting to see something along the lines of "Jurassic Park."Mr. Krylov, who plays for Russia's national water-polo team, could not have guessed the true content of Steven Spielberg's Oscar-winning film, which debuted in Moscow last week. Like many Russians, he had never heard of the Holocaust. "I never knew that these things happened," Mr. Krylov said as he left the theater.Although Nazi troops killed as many as 2.9 million Jews on the territory of the former Soviet Union between 1941 and 1944, little has been said here about Hitler's efforts to exterminate the Jews.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1997
For Holocaust researcher Robert William Kesting, the victims were more than just names found in old records. Despite the passing of 50 years, he could still feel their spirit and hear their voices.Dr. Kesting, 51, the records manager at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington whose research led to the discovery of 450,000 Holocaust victims, died of a heart attack Aug. 13 at Beebe Medical Center in Lewes, Del., while vacationing.The Silver Spring resident became an archivist at the Holocaust museum in 1988.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | April 29, 2007
Kalooki Nights By Howard Jacobson Simon & Schuster / 464 pages / $26 The war in Iraq has made many of us painfully aware of the power religion has to wound as well as heal. The internecine religious civil war in Iraq exemplifies just how awry religion can go from its true purpose. The very beliefs that are meant to make us more humane can often have the opposite effect, spurring people to rage, violence, murder. British writer Howard Jacobson journeys into this complex terrain of religious identity in his latest novel, Kalooki Nights.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 25, 2005
Wrestling with comprehending the enormity of the Holocaust, middle-school students in the Appalachian town of Whitwell, Tenn. (pop. 1,600), came up with a novel, and beautifully simple, idea: amass 6 million paper clips, one for each Jew murdered in Hitler's death factories. The results - not only the kids' enthusiasm, which is admirable, but the effect on the adults supervising them, which is even more heartening - are chronicled in Paper Clips, a moving if overlong and sometimes too calculated documentary from filmmakers Elliot Berlin and Joe Fab. The 1998 Holocaust project was the brainchild of Whitwell Middle School principal Linda Hooper, who looked out at her remarkably homogenous community - only five black families, one Hispanic family and, she notes, not a single Jew or Catholic - and realized the school needed to come up with some way of promoting an understanding of and tolerance for other people's beliefs.
NEWS
February 21, 1994
Continuing a quest that began when she was a child living abroad, Western Maryland College senior Kym Samuels recently traveled to the Czech republic to study the lives of young people who experienced the Holocaust.Ms. Samuels, a history and art history major, is involved in a senior project that will answer questions about how Jewish children reacted to Nazi persecution, confinement, dispossession and execution.She hopes to find that Americans have accepted the history of dTC the Holocaust, especially after the opening of the American Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C., and the film "Schindler's List."
NEWS
By Pamela Woolford and Pamela Woolford,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 5, 2000
PHOTOS DEPICTING everyday life - a woman pushing a stroller, friends playing, a couple in an embrace: The images are common, but in the context of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum they form a striking figure covering the inner walls of a tower three-stories high. These images, 1,500 of them, of a town called Eishyshok before a Nazi invasion became the impetus for filmmaker and Oakland Mills resident Jeff Bieber to produce the film "There Once Was a Town." The documentary, which tells the stories of four Holocaust survivors and their pilgrimage to their childhood home of Eishyshok (then a city in Poland and now part of Lithuania)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.