Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHolocaust
IN THE NEWS

Holocaust

NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | April 26, 1992
A memorial program at the Naval Academy tonight will remind listeners that the effects of the Holocaust continue to reach beyond those who died.The featured speaker, a 1961 Academy graduate, exemplifiesthe consequences of the Holocaust for many of the living, said RabbiAlbert Slomovitz, a chaplain at the academy.Ben Gerson, who works with Merrill Lynch in Washington, was born in Germany in 1937. As a 3-year-old, he and his 5-year-old sister were sent to live with a Christian family in Belgium.
Advertisement
NEWS
By NAHID SIAMDOUST and NAHID SIAMDOUST,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 15, 2005
TEHRAN, IRAN -- Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad escalated his anti-Israeli rhetoric yesterday, calling the Holocaust a "myth" used by Europeans to create a Jewish state in the heart of the Islamic world. Ahmadinejad's latest comments drew swift criticism yesterday in Jerusalem, Washington and Europe, where Britain, Germany and France have taken the lead in pursuing negotiations to prevent Iran from developing nuclear weapons. Germany said the remarks would affect the negotiations, and European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso said Iranians do not have the president, or the regime, they deserve.
NEWS
By Jack L. Levin | September 1, 1993
AS AN American Jew who lost no immediate relatives in the Holocaust, but who tried in the 1930s -- without much success -- to offer haven and compassion to its victims, I experienced a particularly painful recollection during my recent visit to the Holocaust Museum in Washington.The museum recreates all but one horror of that terrible time.Its exhibits scream that the world must never again allow millions of innocents to be systematically destroyed and that never again can a sane person pay any attention to a skinhead or airhead who says it never happened.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | July 5, 1993
During the past few months, sharp images from the U.S. Holocaust Museum -- the canisters of poisonous Zyklon B, the concentration camp uniforms, the hundreds of pairs of victims' shoes -- have pierced the conscience of the nation, reminding Americans of the potentials of humanity's dark side.But fewer are aware of the lesson which the Washington museum has prepared in commemoration of the 1.5 million children who were killed.The permanent exhibition, "Remembering the Children: Daniel's Story," located apart from the adult exhibitions area, is expected attract tens of thousands of schoolchildren each year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2010
Shanlei Cardwell could not fathom why so many people had wanted to kill the engaging old man standing before her. Meredith O'Connell laughed at his jokes and wondered how he had the spirit to tell them after all he'd endured. Both teenagers sensed that they'd be talking about Leo Bretholz for decades to come, that they would take on a small part of the quest that has driven him for almost 50 years. For all that time, Bretholz has crisscrossed the Baltimore area telling his harrowing tale of eluding capture and death as an Austrian Jew living in Europe through the Holocaust.
NEWS
By Matthew Kasper and Matthew Kasper,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 20, 2005
"Do you know what repressed memory means?" World War II veteran Preston Daisey asked the crowd of about 200 John Carroll School seniors, faculty and guests in the school auditorium Tuesday morning. Before anyone could answer, he said, "There's no repressed memory for me." Daisey, an 82-year-old former U.S. Army soldier from Towson, was one of 12 people asked to speak about their experiences with the Holocaust. The program was part of a 12th-grade project on the Holocaust and genocide organized by John Carroll English teacher Louise Geczy.
NEWS
By George F. Will | June 18, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Without an intellectual anchor, cultural institutions are carried along by prevailing intellectual winds, which blow from the left. Familiar exhibits of this process are universities, where various subjects are enveloped in fogs of politics and abstractions.But now the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and the problematic academic field of "Holocaust studies" are illustrating this process. The Holocaust is being exploited by academic entrepreneurs and factions with political agendas, all working to blur what the museum exists to insist upon -- the distinctiveness of the calamity that befell European Jewry.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
Sylvia S. Shoken, a Holocaust survivor who owned several Baltimore neighborhood grocery stores with her husband, died Thursday of complications of a stroke at Milford Manor Nursing Home. She was 73.She was born Sylvia Szmulewicz in Zdunska-Wola, Poland, and was 16 when the Nazis occupied her country. The Nazis marched members of her family, along with others in the Jewish ghetto, to the town's Jewish cemetery, where they were shot."Her mother, brother and younger sister escaped, only to be lost and were probably later gassed," said a son, William R. Shoken of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1997
For Holocaust researcher Robert William Kesting, the victims were more than just names found in old records. Despite the passing of 50 years, he could still feel their spirit and hear their voices.Dr. Kesting, 51, the records manager at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington whose research led to the discovery of 450,000 Holocaust victims, died of a heart attack Aug. 13 at Beebe Medical Center in Lewes, Del., while vacationing.The Silver Spring resident became an archivist at the Holocaust museum in 1988.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | April 29, 2007
Kalooki Nights By Howard Jacobson Simon & Schuster / 464 pages / $26 The war in Iraq has made many of us painfully aware of the power religion has to wound as well as heal. The internecine religious civil war in Iraq exemplifies just how awry religion can go from its true purpose. The very beliefs that are meant to make us more humane can often have the opposite effect, spurring people to rage, violence, murder. British writer Howard Jacobson journeys into this complex terrain of religious identity in his latest novel, Kalooki Nights.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.