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Holocaust Survivors

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NEWS
January 10, 2010
The Jewish Federation of Howard County has received a grant from the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany. County residents who are Holocaust survivors and have a limited income might qualify for a grant to obtain medical care, shelter, food and clothing. Call 410-730-4976, ext. 120, for more information.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
A bill that would block a U.S. subsidiary of the French national railway from bidding to become a partner in a $2.4 billion project because of its role in the Holocaust would put federal funding of the project at "significant risk," the attorney general's office has concluded. In an opinion letter sent Wednesday, General Assembly counsel Dan Friedman told lawmakers that enacting the measure would run afoul of the Federal Transit Administration's rules ensuring open competition among bidders for projects to which it contributes money.
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NEWS
September 29, 2011
Keolis can bid for the contract to run the Camden and Brunswick MARC commuter rail lines ("Holocaust rail fight moves to Congress," Sept. 25). The survivors and descendants of those herded into cattle cars destined for Nazi concentration camps by the French national railroad, the majority shareholder in Keolis, will gain access to the records of their fateful journeys. That's what the General Assembly accomplished with the passage of legislation we introduced this past session.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Leo Bretholz, a Holocaust survivor who became a major voice in the campaign to gain reparations from companies that transported victims to concentration camps during World War II, died Saturday in his sleep of unknown causes at his Pikesville home. He was 93. Mr. Bretholz was scheduled to testify Monday in the Maryland House of Delegates on a bill that would require the French railroad company SNCF, which is seeking a $6 billion contract from the state of Maryland to operate the Purple Line, to pay reparations to U.S. Holocaust survivors.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2010
The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation announced this week that it will award $10 million over five years for emergency services for impoverished Holocaust survivors living in North America. The Weinberg Holocaust Survivors Emergency Assistance Fund provides medical equipment and medications, dental care, transportation, food and short-term home care for Holocaust survivors. The money from the Baltimore-based foundation will be managed by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, based in New York.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2011
It wasn't until Ellen Lightman began to take care of her mother in her final years that she learned that the frail woman used her nightly prayers to whisper words of their family's painful past. "Every night, she prayed that the last few seconds of her parents' life went quickly," said the Baltimore County woman, whose grandparents, great-grandparents and aunt were killed in the Holocaust. "Those last few seconds were in the gas chambers. " "They never would have gotten there had they not been transported by the railroad," she adds, wihout pause.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2011
Baltimore attorney Aaron Greenfield's work representing Holocaust survivors and their families earned him an invitation last month to join a special committee of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. Greenfield, special counsel in the corporate practice group of Duane Morris LLP, was selected after he worked on state legislation requiring firms bidding on commuter rail contracts to disclose whether they had transported Holocaust victims to death camps during World War II. The measure was passed this year by the Maryland General Assembly and signed into law last month.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
Questions of guilt and atonement that are usually the province of historians and moral philosophers arose in Annapolis during hearings Thursday on a bill that would hold a subsidiary of the French national railway responsible for the parent company's role in transporting deportees to death camps under Nazi occupation. Holocaust survivors and their relatives asked Maryland legislators to impose broad disclosure requirements on Keolis America, a Rockville-based company controlled by the French company SNCF, before it can compete for a contract to operate the MARC Camden and Brunswick lines.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2013
The intertwined history of the Jewish Reches family of Mount Washington and Greenspring and the Roman Catholic Staszczak-Wrobel family of Poland is extraordinary, and extraordinarily inspiring. When family members recount it at schools, churches, synagogues - or to passengers on a sightseeing bus - it can bring tears to strangers' eyes. That history began during World War II as Germany occupied Poland and, in 1942, the Nazis resolved to make the small town of Mosciska Judenfrei - free of Jews.
NEWS
July 23, 2013
Helen Thomas may have been a pioneer for women attending press conferences at the White House, but she also had faults that should not be overlooked ("Pioneering journalist broke D.C. glass ceiling," July 21). She was abrasive, arrogant, rude and repetitive in her questioning, leaving a number of presidents, press secretaries and foreign dignitaries, including Margaret Thatcher, disturbed by her tactics. She never failed to show her anti-Israel bias at the White House news conferences, where she always launched into a tirade against Israel that bordered on anti-Semitism before her questioning began.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
The O'Malley administration has chosen a Canadian company to operate two MARC commuter train lines, passing over a competitor whose critics have tied it to Nazi Germany and avoiding a potential fight with Holocaust survivors. The Maryland Department of Transportation is expected to seek Board of Public Works approval Oct. 3 for a nearly six-year, $204 million contract with Bombardier Transportation Services to run the Camden and Brunswick lines. The lines are now owned and operated by CSX Transportation, which has long wanted to get out of the business of running a commuter railroad.
NEWS
September 29, 2011
Keolis can bid for the contract to run the Camden and Brunswick MARC commuter rail lines ("Holocaust rail fight moves to Congress," Sept. 25). The survivors and descendants of those herded into cattle cars destined for Nazi concentration camps by the French national railroad, the majority shareholder in Keolis, will gain access to the records of their fateful journeys. That's what the General Assembly accomplished with the passage of legislation we introduced this past session.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2011
It wasn't until Ellen Lightman began to take care of her mother in her final years that she learned that the frail woman used her nightly prayers to whisper words of their family's painful past. "Every night, she prayed that the last few seconds of her parents' life went quickly," said the Baltimore County woman, whose grandparents, great-grandparents and aunt were killed in the Holocaust. "Those last few seconds were in the gas chambers. " "They never would have gotten there had they not been transported by the railroad," she adds, wihout pause.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2011
Baltimore attorney Aaron Greenfield's work representing Holocaust survivors and their families earned him an invitation last month to join a special committee of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. Greenfield, special counsel in the corporate practice group of Duane Morris LLP, was selected after he worked on state legislation requiring firms bidding on commuter rail contracts to disclose whether they had transported Holocaust victims to death camps during World War II. The measure was passed this year by the Maryland General Assembly and signed into law last month.
NEWS
By Rafael Medoff | April 17, 2011
Academy Award-winning film director Sidney Lumet, who passed away April 9 at age 86, is remembered for classics such as "Twelve Angry Men," the courtroom drama that challenged racial prejudice and which Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor has cited as a major influence on her career. What is not widely known is that before he became a director, Mr. Lumet, as a young actor, was at the center of a 1940s controversy in Baltimore involving Zionist activists and the fight over racial segregation.
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