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By Donald Elliott | April 26, 1995
THE HOLOCAUST Museum in Washington is dedicated to the remembrance of that infamous period of human history when Adolph Hitler and the Nazis perpetrated unspeakable horrors, cruelties and injustices primarily on their Jewish brethren. It is a graphic representation of the worst things that presumably civilized people can do. It contains, among many other items, an actual box car that was used to transport prisoners to the death camps and part of a barracks that housed them before they were herded to their deaths.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2011
Baltimore attorney Aaron Greenfield's work representing Holocaust survivors and their families earned him an invitation last month to join a special committee of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. Greenfield, special counsel in the corporate practice group of Duane Morris LLP, was selected after he worked on state legislation requiring firms bidding on commuter rail contracts to disclose whether they had transported Holocaust victims to death camps during World War II. The measure was passed this year by the Maryland General Assembly and signed into law last month.
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NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2001
WASHINGTON - The message behind the 1933 photograph of two German police officers holding a fearsome dog on a leash was clear to Maryland State Police Maj. Vernon R. Herron yesterday. The photograph of the two men - one, a traditional German police officer; the other, a member of the budding, secret Nazi police - showed how easily the line between good cops and bad cops can become blurred. "Some people couldn't go to those policemen," said Herron, as he toured the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.
EXPLORE
May 30, 2011
Here in Howard County, located in Central Maryland, we’re mere minutes — or, at most, a few hours — away from big-city culture, rural beauty, historic sites and recreational opportunities. WASHINGTON, D.C. With our nation’s capital featured nightly on television, many monuments and buildings are already familiar: the White House, Capitol, Supreme Court, Library of Congress, FBI headquarters, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, Holocaust Museum, Washington Monument, the Lincoln, Jefferson and Vietnam Veterans memorials and the World War II Memorial.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2004
WASHINGTON - In the aged film clip, a string of adults in hospital gowns makes its herky-jerky way along a lawn in the shadows of a grand stone mansion. Everything about them seems exaggerated and unnatural, from their contorted grins to the capering way they move. They are meant to be seen as grotesqueries. The German narrator resumes his ominous message, the words translated in subtitles for present-day, English-speaking museum visitors: "Idiots and the feeble-minded ... live in palaces," the voice intones, diverting "[d]
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | November 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Defying skeptics who thought a museum devoted to Nazi horrors would have little appeal in this country, the new United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has been so popular in its first seven months that museum officials are asking people to stay away."
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 21, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Having finally agreed to extend an invitation to Yasser Arafat for an official visit this week, reversing an earlier decision to deny him a VIP tour, the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum is now waiting to see if the Palestinian leader accepts.In Paris yesterday, Arafat said he was "keen to visit" the museum: "I will study this invitation."Bowing to pressure from the Clinton administration and many of its own board members, the Holocaust Museum moved this week to reverse a decision to deny Arafat an official visit.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2011
Baltimore attorney Aaron Greenfield's work representing Holocaust survivors and their families earned him an invitation last month to join a special committee of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. Greenfield, special counsel in the corporate practice group of Duane Morris LLP, was selected after he worked on state legislation requiring firms bidding on commuter rail contracts to disclose whether they had transported Holocaust victims to death camps during World War II. The measure was passed this year by the Maryland General Assembly and signed into law last month.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | February 22, 1998
WHEN YASSER Arafat met with President Clinton in Washington last month, an effort was made to arrange for the Palestinian leader to visit the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.The idea fizzled, however, after museum director Walter Reich flatly refused to escort Arafat on the official VIP tour normally given world leaders.Reich's action produced a sharply divided reaction in the American Jewish community between those who felt Arafat's visit might contribute to the troubled Mideast peace process and those who consider him a terrorist.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | April 22, 1993
Washington. -- Strange thoughts beat upon the brain: Who held the camera so steadily, and why?In the black-and-white photograph, a naked girl, perhaps 6 years old, dangles, gripped by the neck in the coarse hands of a strong woman (we see nothing of the woman above her biceps). The child, eyes closed, looks uncomfortable but resigned to, and used to, rough handling. Her face is being wrenched around to face the camera. The description in the display in the new Holocaust Memorial Museum reads: ''A mentally disabled girl photographed shortly before her murder.
NEWS
June 12, 2009
A defiant hatred Here's what I strain to understand about people like James W. von Brunn, the man accused of shooting and killing a guard Wednesday at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum: How can such a person live among us, as a functioning member of an interdependent society? How does one who hates the "other" so thoroughly still somehow manage to navigate the modern world in all its complexity? Mr. von Brunn, a convicted felon who lived in Annapolis, was not quiet about his attitudes; he maintained a Web site chronicling his conspiracy theories and poisonous worldview.
NEWS
By Manar Fawakhry | October 16, 2007
WASHINGTON -- He swallowed, opened his eyes wide, put one foot forward and one foot back. His eyes were full of regret or fear, perhaps because he had just shaken my hand and dared to greet me. Or perhaps they were just the eyes of an angry man who despises whoever even mentions the name of the enemy. I couldn't tell. Whatever it meant, this was the reaction of an Arab man when I, a Palestinian woman, greeted his group at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. This is what happened when I told him I am from Israel.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Reporter | March 26, 2007
In the shade of Baltimore's World Trade Center, a prominent plaque overlooks the Inner Harbor. Near this spot, the Baltimore steamer President Warfield began her epic voyage into history. If none of that immediately strikes a chord, the inscription soon solves the mystery by revealing that the Warfield, a converted Chesapeake Bay steamship, made that journey under another name: Exodus 1947. The Jewish Museum of Maryland will commemorate the 60th anniversary of the Exodus' journey with presentations and discussions from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. April 25 at the Chizuk Amuno Congregation, 8100 Stevenson Road.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | June 18, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Seventy-six years ago, thousands of people came to lynch James Cameron. In this, he was not unique. An estimated 4,700 Americans - the vast majority of them black men - suffered that fate in the years between the Civil War and the civil rights movement. Here's what makes Mr. Cameron different: He survived. The rope around his neck and the mob howling for his blood, but he survived. He is believed to be the only person ever to do so. James Cameron died last Sunday at 92 after years of failing health.
NEWS
March 28, 2005
TODAY School-readiness report A report on the status of school readiness of children in Baltimore will be presented to Mayor Martin O'Malley at 1 p.m. at Port Discovery, 35 Market Place. The report from the Baltimore Leaders in Action Program will include a plan for increasing the number of children who are ready for kindergarten. TOMORROW Artist-photographer lecture Artist and photographer Connie Imboden of Baltimore will give a lecture at 11 a.m. in Room 219 of the Cade Center for Fine Arts at the Anne Arundel Community College's Arnold campus, 101 College Parkway.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 16, 2005
JERUSALEM - More than 40 heads of state and ministers, many of them from Europe, gathered here in the chill yesterday evening for the opening of a new Holocaust history museum at Yad Vashem, the Israeli guardian of the Holocaust and its history. More than 10 years in the making, the new museum tries to tell the story of the 6 million Jewish dead, the names of half of them still unknown, through the diaries, photographs, experiences and testimonies of about 100 individuals. Rather than the dry history and emphasis on photographs of the old museum, the new one relies on more modern techniques of film and recreation of reality through artifacts, concentrating on the stories of individuals caught up in the horror of a previously unimaginable world.
FEATURES
By Chuck Myers and Chuck Myers,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Everything about the nation's capital seems to be new this year.A new president has come to town, a new Congress has convened, and not one but three new additions are about to join the city's diverse and rich cultural tradition.The lessons and horrors of the Nazi final solution, communication via the stamped envelope and the exotic beauty of the Far East will take center stage between the end of April and late July, as the United States National Holocaust Museum, the National Postal Museum and the renovated Freer Gallery of Art make their public debuts.
NEWS
March 28, 2005
TODAY School-readiness report A report on the status of school readiness of children in Baltimore will be presented to Mayor Martin O'Malley at 1 p.m. at Port Discovery, 35 Market Place. The report from the Baltimore Leaders in Action Program will include a plan for increasing the number of children who are ready for kindergarten. TOMORROW Artist-photographer lecture Artist and photographer Connie Imboden of Baltimore will give a lecture at 11 a.m. in Room 219 of the Cade Center for Fine Arts at the Anne Arundel Community College's Arnold campus, 101 College Parkway.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2004
WASHINGTON - In the aged film clip, a string of adults in hospital gowns makes its herky-jerky way along a lawn in the shadows of a grand stone mansion. Everything about them seems exaggerated and unnatural, from their contorted grins to the capering way they move. They are meant to be seen as grotesqueries. The German narrator resumes his ominous message, the words translated in subtitles for present-day, English-speaking museum visitors: "Idiots and the feeble-minded ... live in palaces," the voice intones, diverting "[d]
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2001
WASHINGTON - The message behind the 1933 photograph of two German police officers holding a fearsome dog on a leash was clear to Maryland State Police Maj. Vernon R. Herron yesterday. The photograph of the two men - one, a traditional German police officer; the other, a member of the budding, secret Nazi police - showed how easily the line between good cops and bad cops can become blurred. "Some people couldn't go to those policemen," said Herron, as he toured the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.
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