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Holocaust Memorial Museum

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NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Retired Brig. Gen. Alvin D. Ungerleider remembers fighting his way into a German-run slave-labor camp near Nordhausen, Germany, with other soldiers in his company in April 1945.They had stumbled upon a camp being guarded by about 50 German soldiers, whom they quickly overpowered. The American soldiers freed about 300 prisoners, many of them virtual skeletons."The sight that met my eyes is still burned intrinsically into my soul," Mr. Ungerleider said. "We thought we had entered the gates of hell."
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NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and The Washington Post | January 7, 2010
The elderly white supremacist accused of killing a security guard at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in June died Wednesday afternoon at a North Carolina hospital, authorities said. James W. von Brunn of Annapolis, 89, who was wounded in the head during the assault, had been undergoing mental health evaluations at a federal prison in Butner, N.C., in recent months. He died at a hospital near the prison shortly before 1 p.m., a federal prison spokeswoman said. Von Brunn's quiet death contrasts sharply with the brazen violence he unleashed June 10 in what prosecutors have described as a suicide mission, an attack that shocked the nation and sent tourists scattering for cover on a busy downtown street.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 23, 1993
The Holocaust Memorial Museum ought to end forever the myth-making denials that the Holocaust happened, but don't count on it. Washington has survived a lot. It can survive the Gay March on Washington.
NEWS
By Josh Meyer, James Oliphant and Andrew Zajac and Josh Meyer, James Oliphant and Andrew Zajac,TRIBUNE NEWSPAPERS | June 11, 2009
WASHINGTON - An elderly Maryland man with a long history of ties to neo-Nazi organizations walked into the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum on Wednesday and opened fire, killing a security guard, law enforcement officials said. The shooter was shot in the face by museum security and was in critical condition Wednesday night at a Washington hospital, according to The Washington Post. An FBI official said the shooter had been identified as James W. von Brunn, who was described by the Anti-Defamation League and other followers of hate groups as a longtime white supremacist and anti-Semite.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 26, 1993
Any judge who thinks that a rape victim's drunken stupor equals consent is an even greater menace to decent people than the rapist. The Holocaust Memorial Museum makes it much harder to countenance the West's policy on Bosnia. Bill is thinking up a new, even smaller, economic stimulus. He ought to quit on this one while he is behind.
NEWS
October 5, 2001
WHILE the nation girds for war of unknown dimension, the American Visionary Art Museum opens its seventh yearlong major exhibition of intuitive art by untrained artists, on the theme of war and peace. Peace, it turns out, is better. With an uncanny timing characteristic of this museum at the foot of Federal Hill, "The Art of War and Peace" is open from Friday through next August, touching a chord in the American soul. It is about all war, real and imagined, certainly about the war that terrorists made on the United States last month and almost certainly about the response to come, as well as other battles, inhumanities and tortures of the human spirit.
FEATURES
April 28, 1996
In the gardenA variety of garden programs will be offered daily through November at the new Colonial Nursery at Colonial Williamsburg. The focus of the nursery is the untold story of Williamsburg's professional gardeners. At the nursery, gardeners in 18th-century costumes seed, weed, transplant, pot, bud and graft using period tools, techniques and skills. The garden offers a range of hands-on activities for visitors. Call (800) HISTORY. In addition, "Williamsburg's Glorious Gardens," a book featuring full-color photographs by garden photographer Roger Foley, is now available at Williamsburg retail outlets or can be ordered through the mail by sending a check for $25.95, postage paid.
NEWS
April 9, 1993
The Clinton White House's churlish sacking of the chairman and vice chairman of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council three weeks before the public opening of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington was worse than insensitive. It was more than ungrateful for the six years of dedication and toil these citizens contributed. It was incompetent government.Just when council members and staff were going into the last frenzy of preparation for the April 22 dedication and April 26 public opening of the most comprehensive museum to the Holocaust, White House politics destabilized them.
NEWS
January 5, 2000
Jeshajahu Weinberg, 81, a founding director of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, who used his dramatic talents to tell the story of European Jewry, died Saturday in Jerusalem. His creative vision is credited with giving visitors to the museum a glimpse of the reality in Nazi camps and Jewish ghettos in Europe during World War II. On display are more than 30,000 artifacts, including a railroad car used to transport Jews to camps. His innovative work in the Tel Aviv and Washington museums helped earn him the 1999 Israel Prize for lifetime achievement, the most prestigious award the Jewish state bestows on its citizens.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | April 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Four pieces of art by leading American artists were commissioned for the Holocaust Memorial Museum. The artists -- Ellsworth Kelly, Sol LeWitt, Richard Serra and Joel Shapiro -- have produced good art, working in their usual styles but with the site and its meaning in mind. It's not their fault the art itself seems extraneous to the museum, and, if anything, it works against the effect of the rest.Shapiro's "Loss and Regeneration," the one outdoor piece, is a two-part bronze sculpture consisting of a 25-foot-high, semi-abstract, human-like figure near the 15th Street entrance, and a smaller, 9-foot-high house, turned upside down and embedded in the plaza farther from the building.
NEWS
By From Baltimore Sun news services | January 30, 2009
Mickey Rourke won't wrestle pro Chris Jericho A spokeswoman for actor Mickey Rourke says he won't be taking his role as a professional wrestler into a real-life ring after all. Paula Woods told the Associated Press that Rourke will not wrestle WWE superstar Chris Jericho at Wrestlemania 25 in April. Rourke, who plays pro wrestler Randy "The Ram" Robinson in the film The Wrestler, said Sunday at the Screen Actors Guild awards that he would toss Jericho "around the ring like tossed salad."
NEWS
October 5, 2001
WHILE the nation girds for war of unknown dimension, the American Visionary Art Museum opens its seventh yearlong major exhibition of intuitive art by untrained artists, on the theme of war and peace. Peace, it turns out, is better. With an uncanny timing characteristic of this museum at the foot of Federal Hill, "The Art of War and Peace" is open from Friday through next August, touching a chord in the American soul. It is about all war, real and imagined, certainly about the war that terrorists made on the United States last month and almost certainly about the response to come, as well as other battles, inhumanities and tortures of the human spirit.
TOPIC
By Hans Knight | March 4, 2001
ONCE UPON a time, as a reporter for the Philadelphia Bulletin, I asked a group of bright high school seniors what they knew about Adolf Hitler. By then, the Fuehrer had long been dead and gone in far-off Berlin, so most of the answers were not surprising. They went something like this: "He was a bad character. ... He started World War II. ... He did a lot for the German people. ..." Then, I asked the group what they knew about Hitler's attitude toward Jews. "Oh," replied one young man with a touch of boredom, "You mean that 6 million bit?"
NEWS
January 5, 2000
Jeshajahu Weinberg, 81, a founding director of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, who used his dramatic talents to tell the story of European Jewry, died Saturday in Jerusalem. His creative vision is credited with giving visitors to the museum a glimpse of the reality in Nazi camps and Jewish ghettos in Europe during World War II. On display are more than 30,000 artifacts, including a railroad car used to transport Jews to camps. His innovative work in the Tel Aviv and Washington museums helped earn him the 1999 Israel Prize for lifetime achievement, the most prestigious award the Jewish state bestows on its citizens.
FEATURES
April 28, 1996
In the gardenA variety of garden programs will be offered daily through November at the new Colonial Nursery at Colonial Williamsburg. The focus of the nursery is the untold story of Williamsburg's professional gardeners. At the nursery, gardeners in 18th-century costumes seed, weed, transplant, pot, bud and graft using period tools, techniques and skills. The garden offers a range of hands-on activities for visitors. Call (800) HISTORY. In addition, "Williamsburg's Glorious Gardens," a book featuring full-color photographs by garden photographer Roger Foley, is now available at Williamsburg retail outlets or can be ordered through the mail by sending a check for $25.95, postage paid.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Retired Brig. Gen. Alvin D. Ungerleider remembers fighting his way into a German-run slave-labor camp near Nordhausen, Germany, with other soldiers in his company in April 1945.They had stumbled upon a camp being guarded by about 50 German soldiers, whom they quickly overpowered. The American soldiers freed about 300 prisoners, many of them virtual skeletons."The sight that met my eyes is still burned intrinsically into my soul," Mr. Ungerleider said. "We thought we had entered the gates of hell."
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | April 26, 1993
Harvey M. Meyerhoff will be at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum when it opens today, mingling with the first visitors, listening, asking for their impressions.But the guests won't know they're talking to a man who's worked six years just to see this day.He won't introduce himself. He might say he's "with the museum." Otherwise, the chairman of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum -- who has raised money, reviewed plans, settled disputes, negotiated agreements, given directions -- will be doing what he's done since he began overseeing construction of Washington's newest museum.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | April 24, 1993
Last year I went through an exhibition in an Ohio museum of the work of African-American or African-Caribbean artists linked to the 500th anniversary of Columbus' discovery of America.One work was a box or shack. You were meant to walk inside. It was pitch darkness. Uncomfortably hot. You walked forward, unseeing. Straight into a thin wire stretched across. And recoiled back in terror. The experience was meant to convey life in the hold of a slave ship on the middle passage.A similar imagination informs details of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, which opens to the public Monday.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | April 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Loni Lehman walked down the last corridor of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum yesterday, her eyes as wet as the gray day outside, her hands clenching the yellow Jewish star she wore on her clothing as a child in Germany, her head reeling.The 62-year-old New York housewife and Holocaust survivor, one of more than 3,000 visitors who toured the museum yesterday as it opened to the public, said she'd just seen her life flash before her eyes."You try to go day to day without thinking of it if you can," said Mrs. Lehman, whose grandparents perished in the Holocaust.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 26, 1993
Any judge who thinks that a rape victim's drunken stupor equals consent is an even greater menace to decent people than the rapist. The Holocaust Memorial Museum makes it much harder to countenance the West's policy on Bosnia. Bill is thinking up a new, even smaller, economic stimulus. He ought to quit on this one while he is behind.
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