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By Judith Green | March 26, 1998
With firsthand experience of the Holocaust disappearing as the survivors grow old and die, there's a small rush of dance and theater pieces about the annihilation of the 6 million: "Old Wicked Songs," "Esther" and now "Aide Memoire," from the Kibbutz Contemporary Dance Company of Israel.It seems appropriate for "Aide Memoire" to conclude the Kennedy Center's monthlong festival of Israeli arts, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Jewish state. If there had not been a Holocaust, after all, the world's conscience might never have awakened to the need for a Jewish homeland.
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NEWS
March 17, 2014
Leo Bretholz was easily one of the finest human beings of our time ( "Leo Bretholz, Holocaust survivor, dies," March 10). Having lived to be 93, God had certainly granted Leo the gift of years. However, he had accomplished - and was continuing to accomplish - so much that benefited so many that one tended to think he would live forever. He will be mourned by his family first and foremost, by his friends, his neighbors, his fellow Holocaust survivors and the hundreds of people with whom he shared his story in person and in his thrilling book, "Leap into Darkness.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
Gottfried Wagner, author, director, musicologist and great-grandson of Richard Wagner, had a significant role in the development of "Lost Childhood," an opera about the Holocaust and its aftermath. The work, composed by Janice Hamer to a libretto by Baltimore poet Mary Azrael, will be performed (in concert form) Saturday at Strathmore. Wagner, who inspired one of the two main characters in the opera, plans to attend the performance. Prior to leaving his home in Italy for the trip here, Wagner replied to some questions I sent by email.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
A bill that would block a U.S. subsidiary of the French national railway from bidding to become a partner in a $2.4 billion project because of its role in the Holocaust would put federal funding of the project at "significant risk," the attorney general's office has concluded. In an opinion letter sent Wednesday, General Assembly counsel Dan Friedman told lawmakers that enacting the measure would run afoul of the Federal Transit Administration's rules ensuring open competition among bidders for projects to which it contributes money.
NEWS
By Deborah E. Lipstadt and Deborah E. Lipstadt,Newsday | September 4, 1994
Title: "Anatomy of the Auschwitz Death Camp" Ms. Lipstadt is the author of "Denying the Holocaust: The Growing Assault on Truth and Memory."
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | April 25, 1993
JERUSALEM -- Manfred Klafter was arrested by the Nazis and was on his way to the Auschwitz concentration camp when he escaped. Eighty of his relatives died in the Holocaust.But he has little time for Holocaust memorials: "Too much is being spent on commemoration, and not enough on the living," said Mr. Klafter, who now heads a group in Israel offering counseling to Holocaust survivors.The memory of the Holocaust does not rest peacefully in Israel. In the one country where universal agreement about the Holocaust and its lessons might be expected, there remains a national unease about it.Even as those who lived through the Nazi horror grow old and their numbers become inevitably smaller, debate over how to keep the memory alive -- and for what purposes -- remains raw and painful.
NEWS
By Judith Bolton | May 7, 1992
THE SUDDEN public availability of Holocaust archives demonstrates how deeply that tragedy still reverberates. Information previously buried in those documents has helped thousands of people to learn the fate of relatives who disappeared during the genocide a half-century ago.The Baltimore-based Holocaust and War Victims Tracing and Information Center of the American Red Cross brings some of the numbing statistics to life. Tracing people lost or displaced by conflict since the Civil War, the Red Cross acted once again on that mandate by establishing the information center in 1990.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2010
The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation announced this week that it will award $10 million over five years for emergency services for impoverished Holocaust survivors living in North America. The Weinberg Holocaust Survivors Emergency Assistance Fund provides medical equipment and medications, dental care, transportation, food and short-term home care for Holocaust survivors. The money from the Baltimore-based foundation will be managed by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, based in New York.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | April 18, 1996
NEW YORK -- The attention given in America to a new book on the Shoah has already provoked anger in Germany -- justifiably so. The book is ''Hitler's Willing Executors: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust,'' by Daniel Jonah Goldhagen, an assistant professor at Harvard.He says that he is providing ''a new interpretation of the Holocaust itself'' through his research, which finds that ''at least 100,000 Germans, and probably far more, helped exterminate European Jews.'' (Germany's prewar population consisted of some 70 million people.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | March 28, 1996
Leonard Baskin, sculptor, print-maker and painter, has long been known as a deeply committed figurative and humanist artist whose work frequently embraces Jewish subject matter. Among his sculptures are five bronzes created as maquettes for submission to the Holocaust Memorial at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.The one shown here, "Holocaust Figure No. 1," was selected to be created in a monumental version for the memorial. The five maquettes are in an exhibit of Baskin's work now at the gallery at Salisbury State University.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
The specter of the Holocaust came to Annapolis on Monday as survivors and their descendants sought what they view as justice in memory of a witness who couldn't be there. Leo Bretholz of Pikesville had been scheduled to testify on behalf of a bill to prohibit an American subsidiary of the French national railway from building a light rail line in the Washington suburbs unless it pays reparations for its role in transporting Nazi victims to European death camps. Bretholz, who escaped from a cattle car carrying Jews and other Nazi victims to Auschwitz in 1942, died in his sleep Saturday, a few days after his 93rd birthday.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Leo Bretholz, a Holocaust survivor who became a major voice in the campaign to gain reparations from companies that transported victims to concentration camps during World War II, died Saturday in his sleep of unknown causes at his Pikesville home. He was 93. Mr. Bretholz was scheduled to testify Monday in the Maryland House of Delegates on a bill that would require the French railroad company SNCF, which is seeking a $6 billion contract from the state of Maryland to operate the Purple Line, to pay reparations to U.S. Holocaust survivors.
NEWS
By Alain Leray | March 7, 2014
Perhaps the darkest episode in human history, the Holocaust has been at the center of Jewish and world consciousness for over six decades. In the spring of 1940, France was invaded and occupied by Nazi troops. Both my parents and grandparents, who were living in Paris at the time, fled into hiding to survive. During this time, SNCF, the company operating the French railroad system, and the parent company of my current employer, SNCF America, was placed under Nazi command according to Article 13 of the French-German Armistice agreement of June 1940.
NEWS
By Leo Bretholz | March 1, 2014
While it was many years ago, the horrific injustices I experienced during the Holocaust are seared in my brain. I can still recall in explicit detail the atrocities I saw as I was placed in a cattle car bound for a Nazi death camp and as I watched families being separated and possessions taken away. And I cannot forget who was responsible. The train company that tried to send me to Auschwitz was owned and operated by SNCF, a French company that still exists today. SNCF collaborated willingly with the Nazis and was paid per head and per kilometer to transport 76,000 innocent victims - including American pilots shot down over France as well as 11,000 children - across France to death camps like Auschwitz and Buchenwald.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
Gottfried Wagner, author, director, musicologist and great-grandson of Richard Wagner, had a significant role in the development of "Lost Childhood," an opera about the Holocaust and its aftermath. The work, composed by Janice Hamer to a libretto by Baltimore poet Mary Azrael, will be performed (in concert form) Saturday at Strathmore. Wagner, who inspired one of the two main characters in the opera, plans to attend the performance. Prior to leaving his home in Italy for the trip here, Wagner replied to some questions I sent by email.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2013
On the night of Nov. 9, 1938, a well-orchestrated anti-Jewish pogrom erupted throughout Germany and Austria. Synagogues, businesses and homes were attacked, lives were lost. The vicious destruction continued into a second night. The amount of broken glass afterward led to an infamous name for the incident - Kristallnacht. Through the shards could be detected the seeds of the Holocaust. This Saturday, 75 years after Kristallnacht began, an opera about the legacy of the Nazi era will be performed in concert form at the Music Center at Strathmore . "Lost Childhood" has a libretto by Baltimore poet Mary Azrael and music by New Jersey native Janice Hamer.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2013
The intertwined history of the Jewish Reches family of Mount Washington and Greenspring and the Roman Catholic Staszczak-Wrobel family of Poland is extraordinary, and extraordinarily inspiring. When family members recount it at schools, churches, synagogues - or to passengers on a sightseeing bus - it can bring tears to strangers' eyes. That history began during World War II as Germany occupied Poland and, in 1942, the Nazis resolved to make the small town of Mosciska Judenfrei - free of Jews.
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Letter to The Aegis | August 13, 2013
Editor:  I am writing in regards to the recent article published in The Aegis about the Civil War and my complete distaste for it. While I enjoy reading stories and articles about history, your article seemed to revere the Confederate soldiers. It is a complete a slap in the face to ANY American whose ancestors were slaves!  As I read it I wondered if you would have written the article for a Nazi soldier in the same fashion.  When anyone tries to whitewash the Holocaust they are immediately shunned, as they should be!
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