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By Lorenza Munoz and Lorenza Munoz,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 23, 2004
HOLLYWOOD - When it comes to the battle to sell the most DVDs during the holidays, forget the Christmas spirit. Since the DVD format was launched seven years ago, the slugfest has grown more intense each year - to shoppers' delight - as Hollywood studios jockey for position near the checkout scanners of Best Buy Co., Wal-Mart Stores Inc., Target Corp. and Costco Wholesale Corp. stores. Some 40 percent of the $16 billion in annual DVD sales occur from October through December, because of the DVD's popularity as an inexpensive present, the high number of DVD players given as gifts and price cutting by retailers.
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By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,Tribune Newspapers | January 1, 2010
There were inscriptions written above the entrance of the Temple of Apollo at the Oracle of Delphi, and the two most famous ones were cautionary words of wisdom: "Know thyself" and "Nothing too much." Those bits of ancient advice are worth considering as two Hollywood studios hope to launch film franchises that use Greek mythology as the unlikely premise for popcorn entertainment. "These are the stories that began storytelling in many ways," director Louis Leterrier said a few months ago on the London set of his "Clash of the Titans," the Warner Bros.
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By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,Tribune Newspapers | January 1, 2010
There were inscriptions written above the entrance of the Temple of Apollo at the Oracle of Delphi, and the two most famous ones were cautionary words of wisdom: "Know thyself" and "Nothing too much." Those bits of ancient advice are worth considering as two Hollywood studios hope to launch film franchises that use Greek mythology as the unlikely premise for popcorn entertainment. "These are the stories that began storytelling in many ways," director Louis Leterrier said a few months ago on the London set of his "Clash of the Titans," the Warner Bros.
NEWS
April 6, 2009
BUD SHANK, 82 Purveyor of "cool jazz" Bud Shank, 82, who brought Brazilian music to U.S. audiences, helped define "cool jazz" in the 1950s and played the dreamlike flute solo on the Mamas and the Papas' 1965 hit "California Dreamin'," died Thursday at his home in Tucson. He had a lung ailment. Mr. Shank's 60-year career took him from the big bands of the 1940s to the Hollywood studios and to renewed respect as an innovator late in life. Along with Chet Baker, Gerry Mulligan and Dave Brubeck, Mr. Shank was one of the prime creators of the West Coast school of cool, a style of jazz seen as the relaxed, melodic counterpart of California life in the 1950s.
NEWS
April 6, 2009
BUD SHANK, 82 Purveyor of "cool jazz" Bud Shank, 82, who brought Brazilian music to U.S. audiences, helped define "cool jazz" in the 1950s and played the dreamlike flute solo on the Mamas and the Papas' 1965 hit "California Dreamin'," died Thursday at his home in Tucson. He had a lung ailment. Mr. Shank's 60-year career took him from the big bands of the 1940s to the Hollywood studios and to renewed respect as an innovator late in life. Along with Chet Baker, Gerry Mulligan and Dave Brubeck, Mr. Shank was one of the prime creators of the West Coast school of cool, a style of jazz seen as the relaxed, melodic counterpart of California life in the 1950s.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 2, 2007
It just doesn't feel right. At a time when everyone in real life is harboring hopes and making promises for the new year, the Hollywood studios are intent on breaking every resolution they ever made about creating fresh and exciting popular art. Unless you're catching up to November or December award contenders, you'll find January is the dumping-ground month for low-expectation movies, from the pseudo-inspirational Stomp the Yard to manic action-exploitation films...
FEATURES
By Robert W. Welkos and Robert W. Welkos,Los Angeles Times | July 4, 1995
Hollywood -- Each Sunday, Hollywood studios release estimates of how their movies performed at the box office, and the resulting Top 10 list is disseminated to the world through the media.The nation's No. 1 movie, be it "Batman Forever" or "Pocahontas" or "Congo," is, thus, judged a success or failure in the public mind simply by how much money it took in on its opening weekend of release.But how accurate are those Sunday numbers that receive such wide play?While studio executives say every effort is made to be as accurate as possible, they acknowledge that the process, by its very nature, is flawed.
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 8, 1998
Test screenings. A huge marketing campaign with endless commercial tie-ins. A major release onto 1,000-plus screens nationwide.All this for a 60-year-old film that is already one of the best-known, best-loved and most-seen of all time: "The Wizard of Oz."It's the latest and most spectacular example of Hollywood studios rummaging through their vaults and re-releasing classics - or what they think might be classics. Along with 1939's "Oz," 1983's "The Big Chill," the comedy-drama about a reunion of '60s radicals turned yuppies, returned to theaters this past weekend.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 5, 2001
LOS ANGELES - After nearly four months of frequently tense negotiations, Hollywood writers and studios reached a tentative agreement on a three-year contract yesterday, all but certainly averting a strike that economists warned could have cost this city as much as $500 million a week. The contract includes economic gains of $41 million for screenwriters and television writers over the next three years, according to negotiators for the Writers Guild of America, who still have to present the terms to the union's more than 11,000 members for ratification.
FEATURES
By Robin Clark and Robin Clark,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 24, 1993
He'd had eight hours of sleep in six days. One more cup of coffee would send his brain into seizure. And a lady holding on Line 1 thought he was a vulture.But there was no time to worry about that.It was 10 minutes to deadline Tuesday at the Hollywood studios of "A Current Affair," and, as the crew scrambled frantically to wrap up the Big Story, bureau chief Mike Watkiss was beginning to wonder if this was the day it finally happened -- "dead air." In 10 minutes, the show would be fed by satellite to Fox Television subscribers around the globe -- with or without his contribution.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 2, 2007
It just doesn't feel right. At a time when everyone in real life is harboring hopes and making promises for the new year, the Hollywood studios are intent on breaking every resolution they ever made about creating fresh and exciting popular art. Unless you're catching up to November or December award contenders, you'll find January is the dumping-ground month for low-expectation movies, from the pseudo-inspirational Stomp the Yard to manic action-exploitation films...
BUSINESS
By Lorenza Munoz and Lorenza Munoz,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 23, 2004
HOLLYWOOD - When it comes to the battle to sell the most DVDs during the holidays, forget the Christmas spirit. Since the DVD format was launched seven years ago, the slugfest has grown more intense each year - to shoppers' delight - as Hollywood studios jockey for position near the checkout scanners of Best Buy Co., Wal-Mart Stores Inc., Target Corp. and Costco Wholesale Corp. stores. Some 40 percent of the $16 billion in annual DVD sales occur from October through December, because of the DVD's popularity as an inexpensive present, the high number of DVD players given as gifts and price cutting by retailers.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 5, 2001
LOS ANGELES - After nearly four months of frequently tense negotiations, Hollywood writers and studios reached a tentative agreement on a three-year contract yesterday, all but certainly averting a strike that economists warned could have cost this city as much as $500 million a week. The contract includes economic gains of $41 million for screenwriters and television writers over the next three years, according to negotiators for the Writers Guild of America, who still have to present the terms to the union's more than 11,000 members for ratification.
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 8, 1998
Test screenings. A huge marketing campaign with endless commercial tie-ins. A major release onto 1,000-plus screens nationwide.All this for a 60-year-old film that is already one of the best-known, best-loved and most-seen of all time: "The Wizard of Oz."It's the latest and most spectacular example of Hollywood studios rummaging through their vaults and re-releasing classics - or what they think might be classics. Along with 1939's "Oz," 1983's "The Big Chill," the comedy-drama about a reunion of '60s radicals turned yuppies, returned to theaters this past weekend.
FEATURES
By Robert W. Welkos and Robert W. Welkos,Los Angeles Times | July 4, 1995
Hollywood -- Each Sunday, Hollywood studios release estimates of how their movies performed at the box office, and the resulting Top 10 list is disseminated to the world through the media.The nation's No. 1 movie, be it "Batman Forever" or "Pocahontas" or "Congo," is, thus, judged a success or failure in the public mind simply by how much money it took in on its opening weekend of release.But how accurate are those Sunday numbers that receive such wide play?While studio executives say every effort is made to be as accurate as possible, they acknowledge that the process, by its very nature, is flawed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Sun reporter | February 25, 2012
The 2012 Spirit Awards, honoring films made outside the major Hollywood studios and for limited budgets, got started with a ringing endorsement from host Seth Rogen.   "Welcome to the only awards show that is completely inconsequential," said Rogen, setting the tone for an awards show that likes to think of itself as Oscar's feistier, edgier cousin.   Rogen, to much laughter and applause from the audience, went on to poke fun at their determinedly anti-mainstream movies -- "I made it through the first five minutes of every one of them," he said -- and the giant oceanside tent here in Santa Monica in which the awards were announced.
NEWS
November 26, 1990
The rapid evolution of television requires alteration of federal rules governing the production and ownership of programs. Twenty years ago, the networks' domination of the national TV picture was total. The arguments of movie producers to bar the networks from owning shows and production studios made sense. No longer.Diversity in programming has vanished as the number of production studios has diminished. In 1970, eight Hollywood studios provided 39 percent of the networks' program supply.
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