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Hollywood Sign

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By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 30, 2002
LOS ANGELES - Since the 1920s, the white, block letter Hollywood sign perched high in the hills above Hollywood Boulevard has served as a landmark for the movie industry, but recently it has become a pawn in a political battle that could tear this town apart. From one end of this sprawling 466-square-mile city to the other, secessionist fever is raging. Hollywood, the San Fernando Valley and the San Pedro harbor area want to break away and form independent municipalities. The state's Local Agency Formation Commission is analyzing the three secession plans and will decide whether they should appear on the November ballot.
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FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | April 5, 2004
Public officials are supposed to welcome ideas from "ordinary citizens." Everyone benefits from suggestions for making a city better. But it's hard to imagine how any official, elected or otherwise, could be anything but cautious about a proposal to erect a Hollywood-style sign on the side of Federal Hill, consisting of small lights and shrubbery in the shape of letters that spell B-A-L-T-I-M-O-R-E. Some ideas, like plants, deserve to blossom. Others should be nipped in the bud. Unless this idea can be taken to a more sophisticated level, this is one instance where it would be better to "leaf" well enough alone.
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FEATURES
By David Adams and David Adams,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 2, 1995
In Hollywood, three face lifts in a lifetime aren't all that unusual.Even the application of lots of paint may not turn heads in Tinseltown -- just look at Joan Collins.But, hey, the face lift a Cleveland company is doing out in the Hollywood Hills involves real paint -- as in the exterior variety.Dutch Boy Paints, a subsidiary of Cleveland's Sherwin-Williams Co., is donating about $75,000 worth of paint and expertise to recoat the famous, and oh-so-recognizable, "HOLLYWOOD" sign on the hillside above the city made famous by movie stars.
NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 30, 2002
LOS ANGELES - Since the 1920s, the white, block letter Hollywood sign perched high in the hills above Hollywood Boulevard has served as a landmark for the movie industry, but recently it has become a pawn in a political battle that could tear this town apart. From one end of this sprawling 466-square-mile city to the other, secessionist fever is raging. Hollywood, the San Fernando Valley and the San Pedro harbor area want to break away and form independent municipalities. The state's Local Agency Formation Commission is analyzing the three secession plans and will decide whether they should appear on the November ballot.
NEWS
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 9, 1997
HOLLYWOOD -- If you wander down Hollywood Boulevard, stand on Annette Funicello's star along the Walk of Fame and look left, you see it: the Hollywood sign. Through the smog, the boxy white letters appear on the hillside, a beacon to the dreams below.As recognizable as the Statue of Liberty, as celebrated as Big Ben, the nameplate epitomizes the glamour and glitz of this town. But the five-story wonder -- now sandwiched between a hotel logo and movie billboard -- has come to represent the myth of Tinseltown.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | April 5, 2004
Public officials are supposed to welcome ideas from "ordinary citizens." Everyone benefits from suggestions for making a city better. But it's hard to imagine how any official, elected or otherwise, could be anything but cautious about a proposal to erect a Hollywood-style sign on the side of Federal Hill, consisting of small lights and shrubbery in the shape of letters that spell B-A-L-T-I-M-O-R-E. Some ideas, like plants, deserve to blossom. Others should be nipped in the bud. Unless this idea can be taken to a more sophisticated level, this is one instance where it would be better to "leaf" well enough alone.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 23, 2002
HOLLYWOOD - It's got glamour. It's got kitsch. It's got natural beauty, and it's got ostentation. It's got substance, but it's all a facade. It's so Hollywood, it's great. Oscar's news digs, a $615 million shopping and entertainment complex and 3,100-seat theater at the corner of Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue, is everything its developers promised - and maybe a bit more. With its upscale shops and restaurants, it's a promise of what this fabled section of Los Angeles would like to become, a place where fantasies can be indulged and maybe dreams can come true.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | January 7, 1996
Let's get one thing straight. The holly plant does not grow here in Hollywood, Calif. And that huge HOLLYWOOD sign -- the letters are the size of a five-story building -- wasn't designed to tout the film industry. It was hauled up the mountain by mules in 1923 to advertise a new subdivision called Hollywoodland.In the half century since, of course, the small subdivision that started with just one house in a fig orchard has become the center of the nation's film and television industry. The 50-foot high sign -- replaced in 1979 -- has become Los Angeles' most famous landmark.
SPORTS
December 4, 2006
So many bowl games. So many corporate sponsors. Mr. Flip is here to help, with a partial list and helpful comment for each. San Diego County Credit Union Poinsettia Bowl: If you attend this game, don't leave before the final gun. Severe penalty for early withdrawal. Pioneer PureVision Las Vegas Bowl: Mr. Flip would suppose this is one game that had better be televised in high definition. Papajohns.com Bowl: For the complete sedentary experience, this bowl combines watching football with surfing the Web and eating pizza.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 20, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- With warplanes roaring across a blue sky, tanks rolling down Sunset Boulevard and anti-war activists providing a staunch protest, Los Angeles threw a homecoming parade for troops returning from the Persian Gulf war with the showy, flag-waving flair that only Hollywood could provide.An audience estimated at 500,000 to 1 million lined the 3.2-mile Hollywood parade route yesterday, enthusiastically cheering more than 5,000 troops returned from victory in the war with Iraq. Many warriors still exhibited the stone-faced military discipline in their invasion of Hollywood, while such celebrities as Bob Hope and Roseanne Barr played to the crowd.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 23, 2002
HOLLYWOOD - It's got glamour. It's got kitsch. It's got natural beauty, and it's got ostentation. It's got substance, but it's all a facade. It's so Hollywood, it's great. Oscar's news digs, a $615 million shopping and entertainment complex and 3,100-seat theater at the corner of Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue, is everything its developers promised - and maybe a bit more. With its upscale shops and restaurants, it's a promise of what this fabled section of Los Angeles would like to become, a place where fantasies can be indulged and maybe dreams can come true.
NEWS
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 9, 1997
HOLLYWOOD -- If you wander down Hollywood Boulevard, stand on Annette Funicello's star along the Walk of Fame and look left, you see it: the Hollywood sign. Through the smog, the boxy white letters appear on the hillside, a beacon to the dreams below.As recognizable as the Statue of Liberty, as celebrated as Big Ben, the nameplate epitomizes the glamour and glitz of this town. But the five-story wonder -- now sandwiched between a hotel logo and movie billboard -- has come to represent the myth of Tinseltown.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | January 7, 1996
Let's get one thing straight. The holly plant does not grow here in Hollywood, Calif. And that huge HOLLYWOOD sign -- the letters are the size of a five-story building -- wasn't designed to tout the film industry. It was hauled up the mountain by mules in 1923 to advertise a new subdivision called Hollywoodland.In the half century since, of course, the small subdivision that started with just one house in a fig orchard has become the center of the nation's film and television industry. The 50-foot high sign -- replaced in 1979 -- has become Los Angeles' most famous landmark.
FEATURES
By David Adams and David Adams,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 2, 1995
In Hollywood, three face lifts in a lifetime aren't all that unusual.Even the application of lots of paint may not turn heads in Tinseltown -- just look at Joan Collins.But, hey, the face lift a Cleveland company is doing out in the Hollywood Hills involves real paint -- as in the exterior variety.Dutch Boy Paints, a subsidiary of Cleveland's Sherwin-Williams Co., is donating about $75,000 worth of paint and expertise to recoat the famous, and oh-so-recognizable, "HOLLYWOOD" sign on the hillside above the city made famous by movie stars.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | September 29, 1995
The Sun's national baseball writer, Peter Schmuck, ranks the major leagues' 28 teams.Rank, Team, Previous rank, Comment1. Cleveland Indians -- 1 -- Message to other AL hopefuls: Just get out of the way.2. Atlanta Braves -- 2 -- Perfect postseason configuration.3. Cincinnati Reds -- 3 -- Lucky fur will be flying again soon.4. Seattle Mariners -- 4 -- Playing so well it's scary.5. Boston Red Sox -- 6 -- Good club may be in right place (playoffs) at wrong time (same time as Indians).6. Los Angeles Dodgers -- 7 -- Piazza might just hit one over the Hollywood sign.
FEATURES
By Kevin Crust and Kevin Crust,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 2004
A follow-up to the 1999 mishap Baby Geniuses, the new Superbabies: Baby Geniuses 2 may quite easily put an end to any discussion of what is the worst theatrical release of this year. The culprits are once again producer Steven Paul and director Bob Clark. The movie is so bad that Sony Entertainment revived the long-dormant Triumph Films to release it, presumably to avoid putting the mothership's logo in the ads. Further burying a conceit the Look Who's Talking movies ran into the ground more than a decade ago, Superbabies holds that infants have a language only they can comprehend.
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