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Hollywood Boulevard

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By Amy Wallace and Amy Wallace,Los Angeles Times | July 30, 1993
HOLLYWOOD -- It has been 60 years since actress Carole Lombard rented a two-story French Provincial house on Hollywood Boulevard, threw wild parties and fell in love with Clark Gable. It has been 51 years since the vivacious blond comedian -- by that point a resident of suburban Encino -- died in a fiery airplane crash near Las Vegas, Nev.But when it comes to selling real estate, especially Los Angeles real estate, no span of time is lengthy enough to dissociate a house from a celebrity occupant.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 24, 2003
HOLLYWOOD - Chris Cooper listened to his wife, and that's why he won an Oscar last night. The screen veteran won the Best Supporting Actor trophy last night. And were it not for his wife, Marianne, he might have turned down the role of John Laroche, the insatiable free spirit at the center of Adaptation. "Actually, I didn't know if I was capable of fulfilling the role," Cooper said backstage after his win. But then his wife reminded him that the best roles are often intimidating. "When you shy away from the role," he remembered her saying, "you'd better pursue them."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 23, 2002
HOLLYWOOD - It's got glamour. It's got kitsch. It's got natural beauty, and it's got ostentation. It's got substance, but it's all a facade. It's so Hollywood, it's great. Oscar's news digs, a $615 million shopping and entertainment complex and 3,100-seat theater at the corner of Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue, is everything its developers promised - and maybe a bit more. With its upscale shops and restaurants, it's a promise of what this fabled section of Los Angeles would like to become, a place where fantasies can be indulged and maybe dreams can come true.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 23, 2002
HOLLYWOOD - It's got glamour. It's got kitsch. It's got natural beauty, and it's got ostentation. It's got substance, but it's all a facade. It's so Hollywood, it's great. Oscar's news digs, a $615 million shopping and entertainment complex and 3,100-seat theater at the corner of Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue, is everything its developers promised - and maybe a bit more. With its upscale shops and restaurants, it's a promise of what this fabled section of Los Angeles would like to become, a place where fantasies can be indulged and maybe dreams can come true.
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By Renee Tawa and Renee Tawa,Los Angeles Daily News | January 30, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- It was a sunny, blustery afternoon on Hollywood Boulevard, and it was Elvis' 57th birthday.Of course, there were festivities.The King and Hollywood Boulevard, after all, is one of those irresistible couplings, like Nixon and Checkers -- the lure is in the weirdness, the hint of the absurd.There was plenty of wackiness to be had at Elvis' roped-off star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Fans left flowers, a poster-size red glitter heart, a framed color picture of the young Elvis.
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By LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | December 10, 1995
Tourists collected around a yellow caution tape encircling a 3-foot-by-3-foot square of wet terrazzo in front of Mann's Chinese theater on Hollywood Boulevard."
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- For years now, the fanny-pack-toting innocents who ventured a few steps from Mann's Chinese Theater on their tour have stumbled upon the discovery that in a close-up, Hollywood -- the place, the decaying chunk of northwestern Los Angeles -- has little in common with the booming industry of the same name.As they followed the Walk of Fame trail of stars on the sidewalks east along Hollywood Boulevard past the occasional boarded-up shop and the peculiarly loitering young men with beepers or women in stilettos, many shared the reaction of Marlene Keith, a mother of five from the Cape Cod town of Dennisport, Mass.
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By Carla Rivera and Carla Rivera,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 14, 2001
HOLLYWOOD - There is a building at the intersection of Yucca and Wilcox, in the heart of Hollywood, that once was a decrepit home for dozens of runaway teen-agers. But with its red-brick facade and spacious interiors handsomely restored, it now is a sought-after apartment house. Down the street on Hollywood Boulevard, a homeless girl used to sleep under a dusty wall that is now part of the stylish courtyard of the remodeled Egyptian Theatre headquarters of the American Cinematheque. All along the boulevard and around the avenues that are its veins, the one-time haunts of Hollywood's street youth are disappearing under the bulldozers and paint jobs of renovation.
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By Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 18, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- The best thing to come out of the bomb that was "The Two Jakes" would have to be the face lift it afforded Max Factor's Museum of Beauty -- and its immortality. When director and star Jack Nicholson chose the converted salon for a brief scene with a mud-packed Meg Tilly, Paramount Studios spent $20,000 restoring it to the exact condition in which it would have been found in October 1946."Nicholson said he wanted every case filled with the same products that would have been there at the time," museum coordinator Randy Koss explains.
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By Diane Haithman and Diane Haithman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 27, 1996
You are hanging out on Hollywood Boulevard, just one of a handful of weekday morning celebrity seekers checking out the stars in the sidewalk. Just as you are about to walk on Bob Hope and Big Bird, you hear music wafting up from somewhere below: "Hooray for Hollywood."That familiar sound makes you feel, for just a moment, as though you are a big movie star arriving at a premiere of your latest film at, say, the nearby Mann's Chinese. As you flip a feather boa over one shoulder, you offer a Queen Elizabeth wave to your adoring public and thank the little people, flashing blinding white teeth as cameras pop all around you.But then that familiar "get real" feeling quickly replaces the fantasy as you realize the music is not your own personal soundtrack, but a signal that you have arrived at the new Hollywood Entertainment Museum.
NEWS
By Carla Rivera and Carla Rivera,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 14, 2001
HOLLYWOOD - There is a building at the intersection of Yucca and Wilcox, in the heart of Hollywood, that once was a decrepit home for dozens of runaway teen-agers. But with its red-brick facade and spacious interiors handsomely restored, it now is a sought-after apartment house. Down the street on Hollywood Boulevard, a homeless girl used to sleep under a dusty wall that is now part of the stylish courtyard of the remodeled Egyptian Theatre headquarters of the American Cinematheque. All along the boulevard and around the avenues that are its veins, the one-time haunts of Hollywood's street youth are disappearing under the bulldozers and paint jobs of renovation.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- For years now, the fanny-pack-toting innocents who ventured a few steps from Mann's Chinese Theater on their tour have stumbled upon the discovery that in a close-up, Hollywood -- the place, the decaying chunk of northwestern Los Angeles -- has little in common with the booming industry of the same name.As they followed the Walk of Fame trail of stars on the sidewalks east along Hollywood Boulevard past the occasional boarded-up shop and the peculiarly loitering young men with beepers or women in stilettos, many shared the reaction of Marlene Keith, a mother of five from the Cape Cod town of Dennisport, Mass.
FEATURES
By Diane Haithman and Diane Haithman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 27, 1996
You are hanging out on Hollywood Boulevard, just one of a handful of weekday morning celebrity seekers checking out the stars in the sidewalk. Just as you are about to walk on Bob Hope and Big Bird, you hear music wafting up from somewhere below: "Hooray for Hollywood."That familiar sound makes you feel, for just a moment, as though you are a big movie star arriving at a premiere of your latest film at, say, the nearby Mann's Chinese. As you flip a feather boa over one shoulder, you offer a Queen Elizabeth wave to your adoring public and thank the little people, flashing blinding white teeth as cameras pop all around you.But then that familiar "get real" feeling quickly replaces the fantasy as you realize the music is not your own personal soundtrack, but a signal that you have arrived at the new Hollywood Entertainment Museum.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | January 7, 1996
Let's get one thing straight. The holly plant does not grow here in Hollywood, Calif. And that huge HOLLYWOOD sign -- the letters are the size of a five-story building -- wasn't designed to tout the film industry. It was hauled up the mountain by mules in 1923 to advertise a new subdivision called Hollywoodland.In the half century since, of course, the small subdivision that started with just one house in a fig orchard has become the center of the nation's film and television industry. The 50-foot high sign -- replaced in 1979 -- has become Los Angeles' most famous landmark.
FEATURES
By LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | December 10, 1995
Tourists collected around a yellow caution tape encircling a 3-foot-by-3-foot square of wet terrazzo in front of Mann's Chinese theater on Hollywood Boulevard."
FEATURES
By Amy Wallace and Amy Wallace,Los Angeles Times | July 30, 1993
HOLLYWOOD -- It has been 60 years since actress Carole Lombard rented a two-story French Provincial house on Hollywood Boulevard, threw wild parties and fell in love with Clark Gable. It has been 51 years since the vivacious blond comedian -- by that point a resident of suburban Encino -- died in a fiery airplane crash near Las Vegas, Nev.But when it comes to selling real estate, especially Los Angeles real estate, no span of time is lengthy enough to dissociate a house from a celebrity occupant.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 24, 2003
HOLLYWOOD - Chris Cooper listened to his wife, and that's why he won an Oscar last night. The screen veteran won the Best Supporting Actor trophy last night. And were it not for his wife, Marianne, he might have turned down the role of John Laroche, the insatiable free spirit at the center of Adaptation. "Actually, I didn't know if I was capable of fulfilling the role," Cooper said backstage after his win. But then his wife reminded him that the best roles are often intimidating. "When you shy away from the role," he remembered her saying, "you'd better pursue them."
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | January 7, 1996
Let's get one thing straight. The holly plant does not grow here in Hollywood, Calif. And that huge HOLLYWOOD sign -- the letters are the size of a five-story building -- wasn't designed to tout the film industry. It was hauled up the mountain by mules in 1923 to advertise a new subdivision called Hollywoodland.In the half century since, of course, the small subdivision that started with just one house in a fig orchard has become the center of the nation's film and television industry. The 50-foot high sign -- replaced in 1979 -- has become Los Angeles' most famous landmark.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 18, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- The best thing to come out of the bomb that was "The Two Jakes" would have to be the face lift it afforded Max Factor's Museum of Beauty -- and its immortality. When director and star Jack Nicholson chose the converted salon for a brief scene with a mud-packed Meg Tilly, Paramount Studios spent $20,000 restoring it to the exact condition in which it would have been found in October 1946."Nicholson said he wanted every case filled with the same products that would have been there at the time," museum coordinator Randy Koss explains.
FEATURES
By Renee Tawa and Renee Tawa,Los Angeles Daily News | January 30, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- It was a sunny, blustery afternoon on Hollywood Boulevard, and it was Elvis' 57th birthday.Of course, there were festivities.The King and Hollywood Boulevard, after all, is one of those irresistible couplings, like Nixon and Checkers -- the lure is in the weirdness, the hint of the absurd.There was plenty of wackiness to be had at Elvis' roped-off star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Fans left flowers, a poster-size red glitter heart, a framed color picture of the young Elvis.
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