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NEWS
November 16, 1996
An article published in Sunday's editions of The Sun incorrectly stated the dates and circumstances of the founding of Hollywood, Md., and California, Md. According to "History of St. Mary's County, Maryland, 1634-1990," written by Regina Combs Hammett, the post office at Hollywood, named for a holly tree, was established in 1865, and the post office at California, named according to legend by homesick Californians, was estabished in 1874.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 11/16/96
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NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | December 5, 2004
Holly (Ilex) has been the quintessential winter holiday (holy day) decorating green since the Druids first hung it over doorways to snag evil spirits at the threshold. Early Christians harvested it for their own growing traditions, though the thorny leaves and blood-red berries are more emblematic of Good Friday than Jesus' pastoral birth. Murky symbolism aside, appreciation for beauty is probably the real reason you can buy berry-laden holly branches from Thanksgiving on. "This is the time of year that the berries are at their best," says Ron Solt, owner of Solt Garden Nursery in Barto, Pa., and president of the Holly Society of America (HSA)
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NEWS
September 19, 2004
On March 17, JEAN HERLIHY died near Boston following an illness. Mrs. Herlihy was born in Baltimore and lived here for 77 years. A Memorial Service commemorating the life of Jean Herlihy will be held at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, September 22 at Brown Memorial Woodbrook Presbyterian Church, 6200 N. Charles St., Baltimore. Her family and friends are gathering to celebrate her memory and dedicate a holly tree to be planted at the church in her name. All are welcome to attend.
NEWS
September 19, 2004
On March 17, JEAN HERLIHY died near Boston following an illness. Mrs. Herlihy was born in Baltimore and lived here for 77 years. A Memorial Service commemorating the life of Jean Herlihy will be held at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, September 22 at Brown Memorial Woodbrook Presbyterian Church, 6200 N. Charles St., Baltimore. Her family and friends are gathering to celebrate her memory and dedicate a holly tree to be planted at the church in her name. All are welcome to attend.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff | December 4, 1997
For Brian Gray, growing up during the 1950s near the main line tracks of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in Cecil County, the "Holly-Tree-by-the-Tracks" was often the only Christmas tree he had."My dad was a preacher and there were six kids at home. There wasn't an awful lot of money to go around and sometimes we didn't have a Christmas tree," Gray recalled."I could hear the trains passing and they used to rock me to sleep at night," he said. "From an upstairs window, I could see the tree lit at night, and for us kids, it was pure magic.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1996
Growing along the former Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's and today's CSX main line between Baltimore and Philadelphia, some 40 miles north of the city in the Cecil County town of Jackson, is a 126-year old holly tree that for years was decorated and lighted by the railroad.Called the Traveler's Christmas Tree, the Holly-Tree-by-the-Tracks and now the People's Christmas Tree, the tree, for a time, rivaled in popularity the White House Christmas tree and the giant tree in Rockefeller Center.Planted originally by Evan G. Sentman in 1870, after he returned from a fishing trip, the tree grew to became a notable specimen.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 9, 1991
The passenger train that snaked through the Howard Street Tunnel, Remington, Charles Village and Waverly seemed to attract more photographers than Elizabeth Taylor's wedding.At grade crossings and bridges in Baltimore, Harford and Cecil counties and northward to Philadelphia, the shutterbugs were out in droves. The occasion was the one-day re-creation of the old Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's famed Royal Blue."This might be the excursion of the decade," said James Genthner, a Baltimore rail enthusiast.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | December 29, 2002
I have a bag of Diazinon insecticide in my garage for grub control, but I recently heard that the use of Diazinon has been restricted. Is this true and can I still use it for grub control? The restrictions on the use of Diazinon actually started in 1988 when the EPA canceled registration of Diazinon for use on golf courses and sod farms because birds that congregated in those areas were dying off. In December 2000, the EPA reached an agreement with pesticide manufacturers to completely phase out the use of Diazinon over a period of several years.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | December 5, 2004
Holly (Ilex) has been the quintessential winter holiday (holy day) decorating green since the Druids first hung it over doorways to snag evil spirits at the threshold. Early Christians harvested it for their own growing traditions, though the thorny leaves and blood-red berries are more emblematic of Good Friday than Jesus' pastoral birth. Murky symbolism aside, appreciation for beauty is probably the real reason you can buy berry-laden holly branches from Thanksgiving on. "This is the time of year that the berries are at their best," says Ron Solt, owner of Solt Garden Nursery in Barto, Pa., and president of the Holly Society of America (HSA)
FEATURES
By Mike Klingaman | December 21, 1991
Our decorating plans for the holidays have hit a snag because of a pretty little plant in the front yard.My wife and I disagree over the handling of our holly tree. I want to deck the hall with its rich green boughs. But pruning the tree means my wife will deck me.She claims our 3-year-old holly is too young for its first haircut. Nonsense, I said. Hollies expect to be pruned for the holidays. They have made these sacrifices for thousands of years, since the days when the early Romans pinned holly sprigs to their gifts during the pagan festival of Saturnalia each December.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | December 29, 2002
I have a bag of Diazinon insecticide in my garage for grub control, but I recently heard that the use of Diazinon has been restricted. Is this true and can I still use it for grub control? The restrictions on the use of Diazinon actually started in 1988 when the EPA canceled registration of Diazinon for use on golf courses and sod farms because birds that congregated in those areas were dying off. In December 2000, the EPA reached an agreement with pesticide manufacturers to completely phase out the use of Diazinon over a period of several years.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 1999
CHRISTMAS IS THE time for giving and sharing. We give our time to help others less fortunate. We open our doors to family and friends and share our homes to celebrate the joy of the season. But several of our neighbors are doing more -- opening their homes for a Christmas house tour to raise money for the Arundel House of Hope homeless shelter. The Missions Committee of Linthicum Heights United Methodist Church is sponsoring the tour from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Dec. 12. Three beautifully decorated homes and historic Holly Run Chapel, on the church grounds, will be open to the public.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff | December 4, 1997
For Brian Gray, growing up during the 1950s near the main line tracks of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in Cecil County, the "Holly-Tree-by-the-Tracks" was often the only Christmas tree he had."My dad was a preacher and there were six kids at home. There wasn't an awful lot of money to go around and sometimes we didn't have a Christmas tree," Gray recalled."I could hear the trains passing and they used to rock me to sleep at night," he said. "From an upstairs window, I could see the tree lit at night, and for us kids, it was pure magic.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1996
Growing along the former Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's and today's CSX main line between Baltimore and Philadelphia, some 40 miles north of the city in the Cecil County town of Jackson, is a 126-year old holly tree that for years was decorated and lighted by the railroad.Called the Traveler's Christmas Tree, the Holly-Tree-by-the-Tracks and now the People's Christmas Tree, the tree, for a time, rivaled in popularity the White House Christmas tree and the giant tree in Rockefeller Center.Planted originally by Evan G. Sentman in 1870, after he returned from a fishing trip, the tree grew to became a notable specimen.
NEWS
November 16, 1996
An article published in Sunday's editions of The Sun incorrectly stated the dates and circumstances of the founding of Hollywood, Md., and California, Md. According to "History of St. Mary's County, Maryland, 1634-1990," written by Regina Combs Hammett, the post office at Hollywood, named for a holly tree, was established in 1865, and the post office at California, named according to legend by homesick Californians, was estabished in 1874.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 11/16/96
NEWS
By FRAN M. BARTLETT | November 13, 1994
Today I went home again, back to the little Maryland town of Mt. Airy where I grew up, to the yard where I played and the streets where I skated and the hills where I rode my bike.I parked in the lane near the printing shop where I had learned the rudiments of typesetting, and watched my father (former Mount Airy mayor Archley Molesworth) and my brother run the big press.A young man was working on his car. When I told him why I was there, he invited me in to see the rooms which he and his family now call home.
NEWS
By FRAN M. BARTLETT | November 13, 1994
Today I went home again, back to the little Maryland town of Mt. Airy where I grew up, to the yard where I played and the streets where I skated and the hills where I rode my bike.I parked in the lane near the printing shop where I had learned the rudiments of typesetting, and watched my father (former Mount Airy mayor Archley Molesworth) and my brother run the big press.A young man was working on his car. When I told him why I was there, he invited me in to see the rooms which he and his family now call home.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 1999
CHRISTMAS IS THE time for giving and sharing. We give our time to help others less fortunate. We open our doors to family and friends and share our homes to celebrate the joy of the season. But several of our neighbors are doing more -- opening their homes for a Christmas house tour to raise money for the Arundel House of Hope homeless shelter. The Missions Committee of Linthicum Heights United Methodist Church is sponsoring the tour from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Dec. 12. Three beautifully decorated homes and historic Holly Run Chapel, on the church grounds, will be open to the public.
FEATURES
By Mike Klingaman | December 21, 1991
Our decorating plans for the holidays have hit a snag because of a pretty little plant in the front yard.My wife and I disagree over the handling of our holly tree. I want to deck the hall with its rich green boughs. But pruning the tree means my wife will deck me.She claims our 3-year-old holly is too young for its first haircut. Nonsense, I said. Hollies expect to be pruned for the holidays. They have made these sacrifices for thousands of years, since the days when the early Romans pinned holly sprigs to their gifts during the pagan festival of Saturnalia each December.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 9, 1991
The passenger train that snaked through the Howard Street Tunnel, Remington, Charles Village and Waverly seemed to attract more photographers than Elizabeth Taylor's wedding.At grade crossings and bridges in Baltimore, Harford and Cecil counties and northward to Philadelphia, the shutterbugs were out in droves. The occasion was the one-day re-creation of the old Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's famed Royal Blue."This might be the excursion of the decade," said James Genthner, a Baltimore rail enthusiast.
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