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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2010
For 15 years, Stephen White battled the elements. But time and tide have claimed another remnant of the Chesapeake Bay's fading maritime culture. White, a Methodist minister and former waterman, poured his sweat, savings and even a little blood into trying to preserve the last house on Holland Island, an eroding stretch of sand and marsh in the middle of the bay, about six miles offshore from here . The two-story frame structure, which he figures...
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2010
For 15 years, Stephen White battled the elements. But time and tide have claimed another remnant of the Chesapeake Bay's fading maritime culture. White, a Methodist minister and former waterman, poured his sweat, savings and even a little blood into trying to preserve the last house on Holland Island, an eroding stretch of sand and marsh in the middle of the bay, about six miles offshore from here . The two-story frame structure, which he figures...
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NEWS
By CHRIS GUY and CHRIS GUY,SUN STAFF | August 9, 1999
HOLLAND ISLAND -- When he closes his eyes, Stephen L. White can see it all: the neat row of white clapboard houses, the plain country schoolhouse, the skipjacks and work boats in the harbor, the steeple of the Methodist church. He can almost hear the crunch of long-ago footsteps on oyster shell roads that once cut through the marsh of his remote island.It is his island now. Eighty years after most residents had bowed to the relentless Chesapeake tides, hauling their homes and belongings on barges and schooners to the Maryland mainland, White has drawn a quixotic line against erosion that has gobbled all but 80 acres of sand and marsh of Holland Island in the middle of the bay.A developer-builder and former Methodist minister from Salisbury, White has put up $40,000 to buy the last remaining house and about 75 marshy acres.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2010
The last house on Holland Island, a once-thriving fishing community, has fallen, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation says. Photos from the organization show the delapidated house crumpled amid the bay waters, chimneys gone and sides collapsed. Water reached to the second floor of the house. The foundation says strong winds over the weekend brought down the house on the lower Eastern Shore island north of Crisfield. "The last time I saw the house, it was perched on kind of a brick pier, and water was washing underneath," said Donald Baugh, the bay foundation's vice president for education.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2005
As a staff oceanographer for the Johns Hopkins University's Chesapeake Bay Institute, and captain of its research vessels, Lydia Louise I and II, William B. Cronin spent 30 years roaming the Chesapeake Bay gathering scientific data. Throughout his life, Cronin, 90, has been fascinated by the many islands that litter the bay's 200-mile length from Havre de Grace to Norfolk, Va., and to reach them, he carefully guided his 25-foot sailboat, the Ginger, to their sandy shores. Many of these "ragged bits of land," as he described them, are now abandoned or remain occupied by a hardy band of tenacious watermen and farmers who refuse to cede their island homes to rising bay waters.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2010
The last house on Holland Island, a once-thriving fishing community, has fallen, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation says. Photos from the organization show the delapidated house crumpled amid the bay waters, chimneys gone and sides collapsed. Water reached to the second floor of the house. The foundation says strong winds over the weekend brought down the house on the lower Eastern Shore island north of Crisfield. "The last time I saw the house, it was perched on kind of a brick pier, and water was washing underneath," said Donald Baugh, the bay foundation's vice president for education.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | January 16, 1993
We used to call it the mystery island, and we'd take school kids out in the Chesapeake Bay and turn them loose on the island for a day to explore, to probe its secrets and learn its harsh lesson.Before long, someone would push through the thick brush to discover the old cemetery, encircled by an ornate fence of thick wrought iron; or even find a tombstone protruding from the marshy shoreline.Other children would return bearing fragments of pottery, sometimes the entire handle of an elegant teapot, or pieces of glass-stoppered medicine bottles from Colonial apothecaries.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | April 4, 1993
Havre de Grace.-- On a little hill between our house and the barn, there's an old graveyard where lie several Wilsons, members of the family that was farming the place almost 200 years ago.The oldest stone marks the grave of William Wilson, who died in 1806 at the age of 64. Nearby are stones with the names of Elizabeth and Charlotte Wilson, who died in 1829 and 1871 respectively, aged 52 and 92. I presume they were William's unmarried daughters. There are other stones, including some of the small ones usually used for the graves of children, but the inscriptions are no longer legible.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2005
EVEN THIS year, when winter stabs deep into March, you know spring is nearby. You know by the swamp maples' red budding even as ice skims the creek; by the white perch fat with roe gorging watermen's coldwater nets; by February's debut of great blue herons in plumed breeding splendor; by the osprey reclaiming last summer's nest around St. Patrick's Day. You know it on an expedition by the winter-weary to one of the bay's sacred groves, a place that...
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2004
This week I saw 50 years into the future of Chesapeake Bay: Bring boots. For days, offshore winds, with a little boost from the approaching full moon, pushed tides from Long Island to Baltimore about 1.5 feet higher than predicted. Around the lower Eastern Shore, it meant wading to take a walk and avoiding low-lying roads. It also meant parking lots flooded, docks underwater, marshes submerged. Some schools let out early so buses could avoid rising waters, and there were concerns about response times for fire trucks and ambulances due to the flooding.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2005
As a staff oceanographer for the Johns Hopkins University's Chesapeake Bay Institute, and captain of its research vessels, Lydia Louise I and II, William B. Cronin spent 30 years roaming the Chesapeake Bay gathering scientific data. Throughout his life, Cronin, 90, has been fascinated by the many islands that litter the bay's 200-mile length from Havre de Grace to Norfolk, Va., and to reach them, he carefully guided his 25-foot sailboat, the Ginger, to their sandy shores. Many of these "ragged bits of land," as he described them, are now abandoned or remain occupied by a hardy band of tenacious watermen and farmers who refuse to cede their island homes to rising bay waters.
NEWS
By CHRIS GUY and CHRIS GUY,SUN STAFF | August 9, 1999
HOLLAND ISLAND -- When he closes his eyes, Stephen L. White can see it all: the neat row of white clapboard houses, the plain country schoolhouse, the skipjacks and work boats in the harbor, the steeple of the Methodist church. He can almost hear the crunch of long-ago footsteps on oyster shell roads that once cut through the marsh of his remote island.It is his island now. Eighty years after most residents had bowed to the relentless Chesapeake tides, hauling their homes and belongings on barges and schooners to the Maryland mainland, White has drawn a quixotic line against erosion that has gobbled all but 80 acres of sand and marsh of Holland Island in the middle of the bay.A developer-builder and former Methodist minister from Salisbury, White has put up $40,000 to buy the last remaining house and about 75 marshy acres.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2003
IT SEEMED pointless, as Isabel raged across Maryland on Thursday of last week, to be packing for a kayak trip on the bay the next day. But look at the hurricane as a stormy interlude between days of glorious paddling weather, advised my friend Don Baugh. Indeed, as winds declined by the hour, we loaded the boats Friday afternoon in the middle of a Crisfield street. As tide rose around our ankles, we launched, sliding over a seawall normally well above high water. Two hours out, with full dark coming on and Mars laying a pale red gleam on the bay's placid surface, we sighted the dark bulk of the old Fox Island hunting lodge.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | June 11, 1994
It's been two years now, a hundred weekly columns; more rare opportunities for acquaintance of the Chesapeake region than many folks get in a lifetime.There have been people who expressed nature so eloquently:Mitchell Byrd, a Virginian who showed me more bald eagles in an hour on the James River than you might see in the Alaskan wilderness.Halcyon days on the Choptank with that rare bird, Paul Spitzer, a free-lance Ph.D. whose study of loons is as poetic as it is significant.Rambling through the central Maryland countryside -- and through history -- with Mac King, a pioneer in Maryland's conservation movement, who passed away just a couple of weeks ago.And an eerie, fog-enshrouded voyage with I. T. Todd, the last baby born -- some 70 years ago -- in the lost community of Holland Island, now marked only by an ancient cemetery in the marsh, fast eroding into the bay.There have been sights:Legions of limulus, the horseshoe crab, crawling from the water to spawn on sand beaches beneath a full moon -- a creature and a scene so ancient they predate even the evolution of trees.
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