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Holistic Medicine

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By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | March 6, 1991
Jan Seiden suffered chronic pain and depression when she turned to acupuncture.Diagnosed as "suicidal," the Baltimore City resident said she wanted to avoid the powerful drugs prescribed by traditional Western medicine.That decision almost proved fatal, Seiden said yesterday as statelawmakers considered a bill that would allow acupuncturists to practice outside a physician's supervision.The House Environmental Matters Committee heard testimony on two controversial bills introduced by Anne Arundel lawmakers aimed at protecting and advancing unorthodox medical treatments.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Judith S. Campbell, a retired commodity futures broker, died of multiple sclerosis Monday at her Parkton home. She was 61. Judith Sheffield was born in Baltimore and raised in Rosedale. After graduating from Overlea High School in 1969, she earned a bachelor's degree in psychology from what is now Towson University. While living in Denver, Mrs. Campbell became a licensed commodity futures broker. In the 1970s, she joined Campbell & Co. in Baltimore, which had been co-founded by her husband, Kevin B. Campbell, in 1972.
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NEWS
By Jill R. Yesko and Jill R. Yesko,Contributing Writer | November 20, 1994
Linda Gray's patients don't mind if she needles them a bit. That's part of her job.Dr. Gray, who lives in Woodbine, is a holistic veterinarian who practices a combination of Eastern and Western medicines. She said she finds that a little natural medicine can go a long way toward healing pets and their owners.Dr. Gray's interest in natural medicine began after nearly a decade spent in immunologic research. After earning graduate diplomas in immunology at the Johns Hopkins University and in chemistry and microbiology at the University of Maryland, Dr. Gray went back to school -- at what she calls "an advanced age" -- to study for her veterinary degree at Tufts University.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | April 6, 2012
Inspired by an ancient Chinese symbol, which also serves as the logo for her practice, Jade Connelly-Duggan decided to open WisdomWell, a family acupuncture and wellness center in Columbia. “For myself and the people I work with, wellness happens in the gathering place,” she says. “I wanted to create a place where the community can come and gather and share ways of being well.” Connelly-Duggan, a second-generation acupuncturist who has been practicing for four years, founded WisdomWell in November 2011.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
Doctors who practice holistic medicine shouldn't be singled out by the state for punishment, argued patients of a Laurel doctor whose license was suspended last month.About 40 patients of Dr. Ahmad Shamim, who prescribes nutritional therapies, packed a House of Delegates committee hearing yesterday to support legislation by Del. W. Ray Huff that would protect doctors who rely on holistic practices.The Anne Arundel Democrat introduced the bills at the request of constituents who are Dr. Shamim's patients.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett | October 16, 1994
Taking a healthy view of holistic medicineAbout ten years ago, Judith Campbell noticed that her vision was blurring. She started feeling numbness in her legs and "extreme lethargy."Three years later, she was correctly diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a chronic disease that affects the central nervous system. Some people with the disease become dependent on wheelchairs and have difficulty speaking."When the doctors told me, I asked, 'What do I do now?' " she recalls. "The doctor said there was nothing I could do."
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | April 6, 2012
Inspired by an ancient Chinese symbol, which also serves as the logo for her practice, Jade Connelly-Duggan decided to open WisdomWell, a family acupuncture and wellness center in Columbia. “For myself and the people I work with, wellness happens in the gathering place,” she says. “I wanted to create a place where the community can come and gather and share ways of being well.” Connelly-Duggan, a second-generation acupuncturist who has been practicing for four years, founded WisdomWell in November 2011.
NEWS
July 6, 2003
CPR, first aid classes offered by Red Cross The American Red Cross is offering cardiopulmonary resuscitation and first aid classes around the county. These classes will be given at Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church (GELC), 21 Carroll St. Westminster: Infant and Child CPR: The class is from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 26 and costs $35. Infant and Child CPR and First Aid: The class is from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. July 26 and costs $40. CCC has new course in holistic medicine Carroll Community College will offer a new three-credit course, Introduction to Holistic Health and Complementary Medicine this fall.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2011
Bring your karma and your chameleon to the KarmaFest this weekend at Oregon Ridge Park in Cockeysville. In its sixth year, the festival is the work of Patricia Hawse, a Red Cross volunteer who found solace in meditation during her time in Louisiana, where she helped victims of Hurricane Katrina. Afterwards, Hawse vowed to spread the word about the benefits of yoga, meditation, holistic medicine and the power of the pysche. Whether you're a master of the downward-facing dog or simply a poseur, it doesn't matter because by the end of the week we could all use some good karma.
NEWS
By ELISE ARMACOST | January 17, 1993
I should be dead by now.That's what Dr. Ahmad Shamim's holistic diet regimen seems to be telling me. Thirty-two years of hamburgers, ice cream, chocolate cake and fluoride toothpaste should have done me in. Not to mention that I've never had carrot juice or a side order of seaweed.You thought you were making progress by taking the skin off your chicken and striving for five fruits and veggies a day? Dream on. One look at Dr. Shamim's recommendations for disease prevention and you wonder how you're walking around.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | February 8, 2012
I miss Ricky Williams already. You talk about a guy who should leave his brain to medical science when he's gone. This guy's brain would keep researchers busy for 50 years. Williams, the backup Ravens running back who retired Tuesday after 12 seasons, was tough, funny, smart, opinionated and one of the great characters to ever play in the NFL. True to his offbeat nature, Williams didn't trot out the old cliche about retiring just to spend more time with his family. No, every ballplayer from Michael Jordan to Curt Schilling to Barry Bonds has used that one. And most of them end up working so hard at something else that they never see their families anyway.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 21, 2011
Deborah S. Edelman, an author and writer who wrote widely on health issues and established Public Health Media Inc., died Nov. 10 of metastatic breast cancer at her Mount Washington home. She was 51. Dr. Edelman, who kept her maiden name, was born and raised in Garden City, N.Y. After graduating in 1978 from Choate Rosemary Hall in Wallingford, Conn., she earned a bachelor's degree in 1982 in political science from McGill University in Montreal. Dr. Edelman had contemplated a career in law but changed her mind after working as a writer for a medical publisher in New York City for two years, where she covered medical conferences, wrote articles on medical specialties, and was assistant editor of Dermatology News and then editor of Orthopedic News.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2011
The mystery of Ricky Williams turned out not to be a mystery at all. World traveler, former Heisman Trophy winner and onetime NFL rushing champion, the Ravens' newest running back was anything but enigmatic Tuesday in his first meeting with the press. He was insightful, reflective and engaging, seemingly content with life. In an 8-minute interview conducted under a tent top in the middle of a downpour, Williams acknowledged past indiscretions but avowed few regrets. He said he was still a rebel at heart, but one who had learned to channel the rebelliousness.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2011
Bring your karma and your chameleon to the KarmaFest this weekend at Oregon Ridge Park in Cockeysville. In its sixth year, the festival is the work of Patricia Hawse, a Red Cross volunteer who found solace in meditation during her time in Louisiana, where she helped victims of Hurricane Katrina. Afterwards, Hawse vowed to spread the word about the benefits of yoga, meditation, holistic medicine and the power of the pysche. Whether you're a master of the downward-facing dog or simply a poseur, it doesn't matter because by the end of the week we could all use some good karma.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | July 31, 2005
RICKY WILLIAMS didn't have a choice. And neither will Nick Saban. Just as Williams had to come back to the Miami Dolphins last week, Saban likely will have to banish the erstwhile marijuana smoker and once again running back from his locker room in the not-too-distant future. Opening the door for Williams' return was a practical matter for Saban, the Dolphins' new head coach. Williams represents a significant investment by Miami, which gave up first-round draft picks in 2002 and 2003 to get him. The return on that investment was 3,225 rushing yards and 25 touchdowns over two seasons, but no playoff appearances.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Regan and Mary Beth Regan,Special to the Sun | January 25, 2004
Long before the first apothecary opened in this country, Native Americans knew the secret of crushing a common purple flower, called echinacea, to treat everything from snakebites to stuffy noses. Today millions of Americans turn to natural remedies, from echinacea to Vitamin C to elderberry, to treat winter ailments such as the cold or flu. In 2002, for example, consumers spent roughly $800 million on these products to boost their immune systems and to treat illnesses, according to the Nutrition Business Journal, which tracks the industry.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | July 31, 2005
RICKY WILLIAMS didn't have a choice. And neither will Nick Saban. Just as Williams had to come back to the Miami Dolphins last week, Saban likely will have to banish the erstwhile marijuana smoker and once again running back from his locker room in the not-too-distant future. Opening the door for Williams' return was a practical matter for Saban, the Dolphins' new head coach. Williams represents a significant investment by Miami, which gave up first-round draft picks in 2002 and 2003 to get him. The return on that investment was 3,225 rushing yards and 25 touchdowns over two seasons, but no playoff appearances.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith | June 9, 1996
Physician discovers just the right note; Album: Holistic 0) physician Alan Gaby has created a CD of his own songs about medical school and life. Currently on sabbatical, he hopes to revive his 'creative side.'After 15 years practicing holistic medicine in Baltimore, physician Alan Gaby has added music to his medical arsenal.His first CD, "About Doctors & Folks," demonstrates that music can help treat psyches, especially if they belong to physicians who have been overly tenderized by the process of becoming doctors.
NEWS
July 6, 2003
CPR, first aid classes offered by Red Cross The American Red Cross is offering cardiopulmonary resuscitation and first aid classes around the county. These classes will be given at Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church (GELC), 21 Carroll St. Westminster: Infant and Child CPR: The class is from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 26 and costs $35. Infant and Child CPR and First Aid: The class is from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. July 26 and costs $40. CCC has new course in holistic medicine Carroll Community College will offer a new three-credit course, Introduction to Holistic Health and Complementary Medicine this fall.
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