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By LIA GORMSEN and LIA GORMSEN,SUN REPORTER | August 12, 2006
As summer draws to a close, the thought of plopping into a plastic lawn chair for yet another day at the local pool might be losing its appeal. If by this point your sun-kissed hair is turning a peculiar shade of brassy green and the smell of chlorine is enough to make your stomach turn, it might be time to consider a different kind of swimming experience. The Baltimore area is full of natural swimming holes - rivers, lakes, quarries and creeks for swimmers to dive in and enjoy. You might have to trek through some woods to find them, but these refreshing waters offer visitors a fun, chlorine-free way to keep cool while reveling in the great outdoors.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1998
ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- She was down five holes to Grace Park when she walked off the 18th green early yesterday afternoon, halfway through the scheduled 36-hole final in the 98th U.S. Women's Amateur. A birdie on the last hole had given Jenny Chuasiriporn some confidence.It had also renewed the hopes of her parents, two brothers and a cousin who had driven all night from Timonium to watch her play."Anything can happen," her father, Paul, said as he walked into the clubhouse to join the family for lunch.
NEWS
July 14, 2001
QUARRIES are dangerous places to swim. Too often romanticized as the "old swimmin' hole" of bygone eras, these excavated holes in the ground contain a tangle of hidden dangers for unwary swimmers. They are very deep, with uneven and slippery ledges, and the water is much murkier than in a pool. A jumble of rock at the bottom can readily trap a swimmer who sinks. Not only abandoned quarries can pose swimming hazards. Four people have drowned in four years at Beaver Dam Swim Club, a former stone quarry that now operates as a monitored swimming facility in northern Baltimore County.
SPORTS
By Tom Shatel and Tom Shatel,Dallas Morning News John W. Stewart of The Sun's sports staff contributed to this article | July 15, 1991
FORT WORTH, Texas -- The hottest woman turned out to be the 1991 U.S. Women's Open champion, but it had nothing to do with the extreme temperatures or temperaments of the week.It had everything to do with how Meg Mallon kept putting herself in position to win her second women's major championship in three weeks yesterday at Colonial Country Club.Mallon, the 28-year-old LPGA sensation who hadn't won a tournament until this year, shot a 4-under-par 67 to finish at 1-under 283 and beat Pat Bradley by two shots.
SPORTS
By Travis Haney and Travis Haney,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2002
Through 15 holes of yesterday's final round of the Greater Baltimore Classic, eight golfers were within two strokes of the lead, then shared by eventual champion J.C. Snead and Rodger Davis. One by one, the would-be contenders faded coming in, some falling victim to the par-5 18th. Doug Tewell and Bobby Wadkins didn't necessarily fade -- Tewell shot 5-under-par 67 yesterday, Wadkins had a 66 -- but each would have hoped for a more fortuitous finish. Tewell walked up to the 18th green in a tie for the lead.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1995
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Before one competition in the Jack Russell Terrier Association of America's National Trials yesterday, Megan Johnson stood in line in a yellow slicker, while 6 1/2 -month old Tac whimpered in her arms.Then it was Tac's turn to compete in Susquehanna State Park. With morning rain pelting down, the lithe little dog approached a man-made, 10-foot-long tunnel with an entrance hole about 8 inches wide. When judge Terry Grainger said the word, Megan, 13, unleashed Tac.Just 4.55 seconds later, he had wormed his way through to the other end, well within the one-minute limit, and barked at a caged rat at the hole's end for at least 30 seconds -- another requirement related to Jack Russells' original purpose of hunting burrowing animals.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1996
BLOOMFIELD HILLS, Mich. -- Tiger Woods followed the shot of the day with the blow-up of the day.Woods, the can't-miss 20-year-old who's won the last two U.S. Amateur championships and is coming off his first NCAA title, made a lot of noise on the front nine at the U.S. Open yesterday. He holed a 60-degree wedge from 60 yards for birdie on No. 5, hit the stick with his approach on No. 6, and had a share of the lead when he got to 3-under on No. 12.Could Woods keep it up for four days and become the first amateur to win the Open in 63 years?
SPORTS
By MARK HERRMANN and MARK HERRMANN,NEWSDAY | July 3, 2006
NEWPORT, R.I. -- They are not as different as they might seem, Annika Sorenstam and Pat Hurst. Both are roughly the same age, both have had good lives in golf, both shot the same score in 36 holes of playing alongside each other yesterday to finish at even par and both would give anything to win the U.S. Women's Open playoff today. They will give everything they have, which, granted, involves a couple of different inventories: Today's 18-hole playoff 9 a.m., ESPN
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 29, 2001
ROCKVILLE - It took seven extra holes to do it, but Brian Scott of Crofton collected a Middle Atlantic Golf Association junior championship yesterday at steamy Manor Country Club. Scott, an Arundel High School junior, outlasted Georgetown Prep sophomore Greg Carlin in a battle of 15-year-olds. The two played 25 holes to sort out what had been a four-way playoff, with Scott finally winning with his seventh successive par. Carlin's wayward tee shot proved the difference; he needed three strokes to reach the green and could not save par. Earlier, high school juniors Alex Brueggemann (John Carroll)
SPORTS
By Ed Sherman and Ed Sherman,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 9, 2005
SILVIS, Ill. - Two bad holes. That's all it took from denying Michelle Wie a special place in history yesterday. Or, judging by the way she played, it might be history deferred. Wie had a shot to spare inside the magic cut line with four holes left during the second round of the John Deere Classic. But a couple disastrous shots prevented her from becoming the first woman to make the cut in a PGA Tour event since Babe Didrikson Zaharias did it in 1945. Wie had to settle for a 71 playing in front of enthusiastic Tiger Woods-size galleries at the TPC at Deere Run. At 1-under par, she missed the cut by two shots.
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