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NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | January 9, 2005
Animal holes are appearing suddenly along the foundation in back of our home. They're about 3 inches wide, but we're not seeing any animals. My neighbor has dogs and cats, and they haven't caught anything. Could it be snakes? I feed birds and want to protect them. The size of the holes and the location along walls suggest rats. (Snakes can't dig holes.) Rats are very shy, cautious animals, living in city or country wherever there is a food source. They normally live within 100 to 150 feet of their food supply.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
The words delivered in the Orioles clubhouse after another jaw-busting, late-inning loss to the Kansas City Royals in the American League Championship Series belied the otherwise eerie silence that punctuated the room. Bounce around from player to player after Saturday's 6-4 loss in Game 2 and, no matter who you talk to, the refrain remains the same. It's only two losses. These Orioles are great on the road. They have overcome so much adversity, what's a little more? “It's tough, it's a hole,” Orioles reliever Darren O'Day said.
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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2010
The problem Holes remain in a Northeast Baltimore sidewalk months after streetlight repairs. The back story The Holts did what they were supposed to do. About five months ago, they called Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. to report problems with the streetlight in the 7600 block of Mars Ave., in the North Harford Road neighborhood. Contractors came to repair the light. They dug holes in the sidewalk, and afterward, filled most of them with asphalt, not concrete. "They filled in a couple of the holes but put a bucket over the one and just left it there and never did anything with it," said Linda Holt, who lives across the street.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck and The Schmuck Stops Here | October 11, 2014
There is only one hook left for the Orioles to hang their World Series hopes on, and it certainly isn't history. They have dug themselves a hole in the American League Championship Series that no team has ever climbed out of, so they'll have to dig deep into their own team chemistry to pull out this best-of-seven playoff after losing the first two games at home. The Orioles have been known for their resiliency throughout the Buck Showalter era. They have bounced back from all manner of adversity, especially during this unlikely AL East championship season, and they will have to do that over the next several days in Kansas City just to force the series back to Camden Yards.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
Orioles right-hander Ubaldo Jimenez has a $50 million contract, a 2-6 record and the knowledge that his recent starts just won't cut it. And the 9-0 loss to the Cleveland Indians, his former team, on Saturday at Camden Yards was the most frustrating of them all. “They found the holes,” Jimenez said in Spanish on Sunday. “A ground ball up the middle, a bloop to left field, an infield hit. They hit me five times, and of those, the only hard one was the fifth, Yan Gomes' line drive.” A walk and Gomes' hit put two runners on with nobody out in the fifth inning Saturday.
NEWS
By ROBERT BURRUSS | April 25, 1995
Kensington. -- The cultural effects of the main physical-science discovery of this century have not yet even begun to reach the world.It's easy to imagine that Isaac Newton's ideas about force and mass, in the late 1600s, took at least a century to move Western culture fully into its deterministic mode -- namely, to the view that destiny is predetermined, and that with enough information about the present state of the world, we'd be able to predict the...
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 18, 1991
CHASKA, Minn. -- Scott Simpson will think about the last three holes at Hazeltine National Golf Club for a long time. Maybe even longer than he will think about losing the 91st U.S. Open.The last three holes -- two par-4s sandwiched around a par-3 -- turned into a Homeric struggle for Simpson. He bogeyed all three in yesterday's playoff to Payne Stewart; was 7-over the last three rounds and lost by two shots."I didn't feel any different playing the last three holes today," said Simpson, who finished with a 5-over-par 77. "They're good holes.
SPORTS
By John Stewart and John Stewart,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1996
DENTON -- April Hardisty completed a rare grand slam when she parred the first extra hole to defeat Jane Fitzgerald for the 75th amateur championship of the women's division of the Maryland State Golf Association yesterday.The outcome of the event that had its strongest championship field in years gave Hardisty, 21, a sweep of the medal and title on her home course. She is the youngest champion of this event since Sarah LeBrun, 20, won it in 1986.No more than one hole separated Hardisty and Fitzgerald throughout their scheduled 18-hole match.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2005
City library officials believe Holes will be the perfect way for area youth to fill in those dreary summer gaps. Louis Sachar's 1998 novel about friendship and destiny has been selected as the fourth annual "Baltimore's Book" and will be handed out to children in fourth grade and above who register for the state's summer reading program today at an event at Mondawmin Mall. Holes, a popular children's book that spawned a Disney feature film, chronicles the odyssey of Stanley Yelnats, who is wrongly sent to a boys' detention camp and ordered by a vicious warden to dig holes all day. The book interweaves two mysterious story lines brought together and resolved by Stanley's courage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Rosenthal and Dave Rosenthal,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com | May 10, 2009
I like fishing holes. I like holes-in-one. I like holes in doughnuts. I do not like holes in novels. Although it's only May, this year I've already read two books that had gaping, unforgivable holes in their plots. Both would be apparent to anyone who reads even an occasional Agatha Christie mystery or watches the slightest amount of CSI. Both certainly should have been apparent to editors. The holes left me with a sour taste for otherwise enjoyable books: Beyond Suspicion by Tanguy Viel and City of Thieves by David Benioff.
NEWS
October 3, 2014
Maryland's legislature decided to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana for a few reasons. Lawmakers concluded that police and prosecutors should not be focusing their attention on what is increasingly viewed by the public as a relatively harmless vice; they expressed concern that criminal convictions related to marijuana possession were harming the employment and educational prospects of thousands of Marylanders; and they were alarmed...
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Responding to a question about whether rookie safety Terrence Brooks could be an option in the nickel back role, Ravens defensive coordinator Dean Pees' answer probably could have applied to several positions. "It's an option. Everybody is an option right now," Pees said. "We're just trying to find guys. We're kind of moving guys around a little bit. We have two more games really to kind of experiment with where we want to put guys and see where they fit getting ready for the season.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A company sprayed my neighbor's yard for mosquitoes, but when I called the company it admitted that its chemical killed all kinds of insects, including pollinators and beneficials. So I don't want to do that, but we are getting eaten alive by mosquitoes all day! Help! The Asian tiger mosquito, which bites ferociously during the day, has forced people to reexamine and get smarter about mosquito strategies. We agree that preserving beneficial and pollinating insects must be a priority, and some of those beneficials even eat mosquitoes!
SPORTS
By John Jiloty and Inside Lacrosse | July 10, 2014
Coming into the Federation of International Lacrosse World Championships, Team USA didn't display many holes, with a star-studded roster coached by a deep and talented staff. The reigning gold medalist from the 2010 world games, the U.S. team opened this year's event with a dominant 10-7 win over archrival Canada at Dick's Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City, Colo. Midfielder Paul Rabil (Johns Hopkins) led the U.S. with two goals and two assists, while Rob Pannell and Kevin Buchanan (Calvert Hall)
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
BETHESDA -- As David Feherty walked up the fourth fairway Sunday following third-round leader Patrick Reed to a tee shot that landed in the right rough, the CBS golf analyst said to a reporter doing the same: “Congressional [Country Club] finally got the course like they wanted it for the U.S. Open.” Three years after Rory McIlroy's performance caused shock waves throughout both the golf world and the club itself, the venerable Blue Course finally took its revenge in the Quicken Loans National.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 23, 2014
When historians get around to appraising the start of the new century, what will they say about it? If circumstances continue as they have been, the period may well be deemed a deep black hole in the political life of this country. From the disputatious presidential election of 2000, in which the supposedly nonpolitical Supreme Court stepped in to decide the winner; to the brutal terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon; to the unwarranted U.S. invasion of Iraq and its disastrous aftermath; to the Great Recession at home; and now the disintegration of the American-backed regime in Iraq, the last nearly 14 years have witnessed a woeful stall in the American dream.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Staff Writer | July 23, 1993
CARMEL, Ind. -- Before the 48th United States Women's Open championship began, veteran players were calling the last three holes of the Crooked Stick Golf Club as hard as any they had played.While others were crashing around her, Helen Alfredsson, in the midst of an outstanding Ladies Professional Golf Association tour season, sailed down the stretch with three successive birdies to take the early first-round lead with a 4-under-par 34-3468.Later, Ayako Okamoto birdied 14 and 15 to get to 4 under, then parred the last three for 34-3468, and a share of the lead.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | June 7, 1994
It was after gazing upon and playing the ninth hole at Avenel the first year the course hosted the Kemper Open that Greg Norman said, "That ninth green should be dynamited.""The Shark" felt sufficiently strong about it that he studiously avoided the Washington stop on the PGA Tour a few times and later, when they decided to re-design the hole, Norman was invited to push the plunger detonating the dynamite that would blow the green to kingdom come.Actually, the par-3, a 9-iron belt straight down a hill to a narrow green running away and bordered by a creek on three sides and a trap on the other, wasn't that bad. Not after reading the book "America's Worst Golf Courses," anyway.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
Orioles right-hander Ubaldo Jimenez has a $50 million contract, a 2-6 record and the knowledge that his recent starts just won't cut it. And the 9-0 loss to the Cleveland Indians, his former team, on Saturday at Camden Yards was the most frustrating of them all. “They found the holes,” Jimenez said in Spanish on Sunday. “A ground ball up the middle, a bloop to left field, an infield hit. They hit me five times, and of those, the only hard one was the fifth, Yan Gomes' line drive.” A walk and Gomes' hit put two runners on with nobody out in the fifth inning Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
No offense to conventional hotels, but sometimes you just want to stay someplace a little different, a little avant-garde, someplace you'll be able to tell the grandkids about someday. You know, someplace that, once you post a picture on Facebook, will make every one of your 732 friends positively green with envy - or at least scratching their heads, wondering how you ever found this place. (And preferably, someplace that won't require taking out a second mortgage to get there and hang out for a few days - which, regrettably, precludes anything atop Mount Kilimanjaro.)
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