Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHoldridge
IN THE NEWS

Holdridge

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 17, 2006
On June 14, 2006, MARGARET ANN; devoted mother of Christine Buckley and her husband Matthew, Sandra Vogel and her husband Brian and Jill Eckart; beloved daughter of Margaret Holdridge and the late Herbert Holdridge; dear sister of Jim Holdridge and his wife Connie and Marie Hoops and her husband James; loving grandmother of Ethan Vogel and Nathan Buckley. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the SCHIMUNEK FUNERAL HOME OF BEL AIR, INC., 610 W. Mc Phail Road (at Route 24) on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 P.M. A Funeral Mass will be held on Saturday, at 9 A.M. at St. Ignatius Hickory Church.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 17, 2006
On June 14, 2006, MARGARET ANN; devoted mother of Christine Buckley and her husband Matthew, Sandra Vogel and her husband Brian and Jill Eckart; beloved daughter of Margaret Holdridge and the late Herbert Holdridge; dear sister of Jim Holdridge and his wife Connie and Marie Hoops and her husband James; loving grandmother of Ethan Vogel and Nathan Buckley. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the SCHIMUNEK FUNERAL HOME OF BEL AIR, INC., 610 W. Mc Phail Road (at Route 24) on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 P.M. A Funeral Mass will be held on Saturday, at 9 A.M. at St. Ignatius Hickory Church.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1998
Lawrence Barrett Holdridge, founder of a hydraulic equipment company and collector of decorative arts, died of heart failure Tuesday at his historic home near Owings Mills. He was 88.A self-taught engineer, he established Holdridge Engineering in 1941. Its specialties included measuring devices and gauges. He retired in 1991 after selling the business to Hydratech Inc.Mr. Holdridge was known for his urbanity and wit, as well as his interest in the arts, music and antique collecting.Mr. Holdridge and his wife of 38 years, the former Barbara Cohen, a publisher and co-founder of Caedmon Records, lived in historic Stemmer House since 1973.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2003
COLLEGE PARK - Of all his marvelous swims at the world championships last month, the final in the 200-meter individual medley was paramount for Michael Phelps. That was the swim that allowed him to become the first man to set world records in different events on the same day. His time of 1 minute, 56.04 seconds was graded by FINA, the sport's governing body, as the top performance among thousands in Barcelona, Spain. It stood as a standard for 15 days. Capping what may be the greatest non-Olympic campaign by a swimmer, Phelps used all of his adrenaline, 6 feet 4 and 192 pounds to lower his world record to 1:55.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | May 7, 1991
For five days last month, David Holdridge traveled by jeep among thousands of starving refugees in northern Iraq. He covered some 3,000 miles and hardly slept. Not long after his arrival, time came to lose meaning for him."Days have no significance in a situation like that. For a thousand bucks, I couldn't have told you whether it was Wednesday or Saturday," says the official with Catholic Relief Services, a Baltimore-based international aid organization.Holdridge, who monitors Europe, Asia and parts of Africa for CRS, was in Iraq to get a first-hand look at the grim conditions there.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Evening Sun Staff | November 21, 1990
Towson State athletic director Bill Hunter said yesterday he was optimistic the school would play football in 1991 and beyond.Hunter and other Towson State administrators attended a meeting yesterday of the Intercollegiate Athletic Committee at which football supporters outlined fund-raising and marketing plans. When the IAC reports to the University Senate Dec. 3, Hunter said that he is confident its report will involve maintaining football.The IAC, which in October voted 8-1 to suspend football, withdrew that motion from the University Senate Nov. 5.Yesterday the IAC heard from Jim Holdridge, an account executive for a Linthicum computer firm who played for the Tigers from 1973-76.
NEWS
By Compiled from the files of the Carroll County Historical Society's library | April 28, 1996
50 years ago Desmond X. Holdridge, a 40-year-old Baltimore explorer and author, was killed in an automobile accident at noon Friday at the cross roads in Finksburg. Holdridge had his first brush with death at the age of 14 when, at a boys camp in New York, he fitted a rowboat with a sail only to be caught in a severe squall which crashed the boat against the shore of the lake. In 1925, with two other youths, Holdridge cruised into sub-Arctic waters in the Atlantic, where a five-day gale battered his 32-foot boat to pieces.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
Fifty years have passed since two young women hauled the great Welsh poet Dylan Thomas into a studio in New York City where he read the story A Child's Christmas in Wales and the half-dozen poems that became one of the most popular recordings in the history of literature. All three were making their first record. Barbara Cohen Holdridge and Marianne Roney Mantell, both then 22, were founding Caedmon Records with about $1,500 and more or less unlimited hope. They gave Thomas a $500 advance and a promise of 10 percent of the royalties.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 9, 1999
SKOPJE, Macedonia -- Peace looked so imminent on Friday that the Catholic Relief Services office here loaded a dozen 20-ton trucks with food aid to be distributed in Kosovo. The peace accord took a detour and the trucks stayed in the warehouse.But sooner or later the day will come when they join what may be one of the great traffic jams of history, as NATO troops, international relief agencies and hundreds of thousands of refugees take to the single road north of here that leads to Kosovo.
NEWS
By Justin Beck and Justin Beck,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2002
Nobody knows better than Barbara Holdridge how big a nuisance deer can be. Holdridge spends much of her free time tending to the garden at her home on Caves Road in the lush Green Spring Valley area of Owings Mills. Like many residents there, she decided she had had enough of the local deer population after spending thousands of dollars on Lyme disease vaccinations, landscaping and repairs to damaged vehicles. So Holdridge put up an 8-foot electric fence capable of sending a 4,650-volt shock - a fence that violates Baltimore County zoning regulations for side and back yards.
NEWS
By Justin Beck and Justin Beck,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2002
Nobody knows better than Barbara Holdridge how big a nuisance deer can be. Holdridge spends much of her free time tending to the garden at her home on Caves Road in the lush Green Spring Valley area of Owings Mills. Like many residents there, she decided she had had enough of the local deer population after spending thousands of dollars on Lyme disease vaccinations, landscaping and repairs to damaged vehicles. So Holdridge put up an 8-foot electric fence capable of sending a 4,650-volt shock - a fence that violates Baltimore County zoning regulations for side and back yards.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
Fifty years have passed since two young women hauled the great Welsh poet Dylan Thomas into a studio in New York City where he read the story A Child's Christmas in Wales and the half-dozen poems that became one of the most popular recordings in the history of literature. All three were making their first record. Barbara Cohen Holdridge and Marianne Roney Mantell, both then 22, were founding Caedmon Records with about $1,500 and more or less unlimited hope. They gave Thomas a $500 advance and a promise of 10 percent of the royalties.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 9, 1999
SKOPJE, Macedonia -- Peace looked so imminent on Friday that the Catholic Relief Services office here loaded a dozen 20-ton trucks with food aid to be distributed in Kosovo. The peace accord took a detour and the trucks stayed in the warehouse.But sooner or later the day will come when they join what may be one of the great traffic jams of history, as NATO troops, international relief agencies and hundreds of thousands of refugees take to the single road north of here that leads to Kosovo.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1998
Lawrence Barrett Holdridge, founder of a hydraulic equipment company and collector of decorative arts, died of heart failure Tuesday at his historic home near Owings Mills. He was 88.A self-taught engineer, he established Holdridge Engineering in 1941. Its specialties included measuring devices and gauges. He retired in 1991 after selling the business to Hydratech Inc.Mr. Holdridge was known for his urbanity and wit, as well as his interest in the arts, music and antique collecting.Mr. Holdridge and his wife of 38 years, the former Barbara Cohen, a publisher and co-founder of Caedmon Records, lived in historic Stemmer House since 1973.
NEWS
By Compiled from the files of the Carroll County Historical Society's library | April 28, 1996
50 years ago Desmond X. Holdridge, a 40-year-old Baltimore explorer and author, was killed in an automobile accident at noon Friday at the cross roads in Finksburg. Holdridge had his first brush with death at the age of 14 when, at a boys camp in New York, he fitted a rowboat with a sail only to be caught in a severe squall which crashed the boat against the shore of the lake. In 1925, with two other youths, Holdridge cruised into sub-Arctic waters in the Atlantic, where a five-day gale battered his 32-foot boat to pieces.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | May 7, 1991
For five days last month, David Holdridge traveled by jeep among thousands of starving refugees in northern Iraq. He covered some 3,000 miles and hardly slept. Not long after his arrival, time came to lose meaning for him."Days have no significance in a situation like that. For a thousand bucks, I couldn't have told you whether it was Wednesday or Saturday," says the official with Catholic Relief Services, a Baltimore-based international aid organization.Holdridge, who monitors Europe, Asia and parts of Africa for CRS, was in Iraq to get a first-hand look at the grim conditions there.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2003
COLLEGE PARK - Of all his marvelous swims at the world championships last month, the final in the 200-meter individual medley was paramount for Michael Phelps. That was the swim that allowed him to become the first man to set world records in different events on the same day. His time of 1 minute, 56.04 seconds was graded by FINA, the sport's governing body, as the top performance among thousands in Barcelona, Spain. It stood as a standard for 15 days. Capping what may be the greatest non-Olympic campaign by a swimmer, Phelps used all of his adrenaline, 6 feet 4 and 192 pounds to lower his world record to 1:55.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
A knock rarely brings the owner to the front door of Stemmer House. It is more likely that she will emerge to greet you from her gardens, wearing her trademark galoshes, tool belt, work gloves and sun hat. Though Barbara Holdridge has lived in this historic Baltimore County home for nearly 40 years, it is her gardens that demand her time and attention. More than six of the 27 acres that surround the home are formally landscaped, and if they don't need to be weeded, they need to be watered.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Evening Sun Staff | November 21, 1990
Towson State athletic director Bill Hunter said yesterday he was optimistic the school would play football in 1991 and beyond.Hunter and other Towson State administrators attended a meeting yesterday of the Intercollegiate Athletic Committee at which football supporters outlined fund-raising and marketing plans. When the IAC reports to the University Senate Dec. 3, Hunter said that he is confident its report will involve maintaining football.The IAC, which in October voted 8-1 to suspend football, withdrew that motion from the University Senate Nov. 5.Yesterday the IAC heard from Jim Holdridge, an account executive for a Linthicum computer firm who played for the Tigers from 1973-76.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.