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By Elaine Woo and Tribune Newspapers | January 29, 2010
J.D. Salinger, one of contemporary literature's most famous recluses, who created a lasting symbol of adolescent discontent in his 1951 novel "The Catcher in the Rye," died Wednesday. He was 91. Mr. Salinger died of natural causes at his home in Cornish, N.H., his son Matthew said in a statement from the author's longtime literary agency, Harold Ober Associates, which made the announcement on behalf of Mr. Salinger's family. Perhaps no other writer of so few works generated as much popular and critical interest as Mr. Salinger, who published one novel, three authorized collections of short stories and an additional 21 stories that appeared in magazines only in the 1940s.
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NEWS
By Matthew Olshan | December 5, 2010
When I was a young man, I loved Moliere's "The Misanthrope. " Alceste, the hero (or rather, comic antihero) of the play, fed up with the artifice and false manners of 17th century Paris, resolves to tell everyone exactly what he thinks, whether or not the truth-telling serves his own interests. Which, of course, it never does, the lesson being that for people to get along — and, by extension, for society to function — one can't simply blurt out what one thinks without regard for the consequences.
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NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | April 9, 1993
JUST to save you a little time, the woman with her left breast partially exposed is in the upper right quadrant of the beach page of "Where's Waldo?" Waldo is, of course, the little man with the striped shirt and spectacles who wanders in the pages of his books through everything from track meets to Viking hordes, so lost in the crowd that it is a challenge for kids to find him in the illustrations.It is difficult to find the woman with the bare breast, too. But if you look real hard you can spot her just below the guys running on the beach and just above the man buried up to his neck in sand.
NEWS
By Elaine Woo and Elaine Woo,Tribune Newspapers | January 29, 2010
J.D. Salinger, one of contemporary literature's most famous recluses, who created a lasting symbol of adolescent discontent in his 1951 novel "The Catcher in the Rye," died Wednesday. He was 91. Mr. Salinger died of natural causes at his home in Cornish, N.H., his son Matthew said in a statement from the author's longtime literary agency, Harold Ober Associates, which made the announcement on behalf of Mr. Salinger's family. Perhaps no other writer of so few works generated as much popular and critical interest as Mr. Salinger, who published one novel, three authorized collections of short stories and an additional 21 stories that appeared in magazines only in the 1940s.
NEWS
By Matthew Olshan | December 5, 2010
When I was a young man, I loved Moliere's "The Misanthrope. " Alceste, the hero (or rather, comic antihero) of the play, fed up with the artifice and false manners of 17th century Paris, resolves to tell everyone exactly what he thinks, whether or not the truth-telling serves his own interests. Which, of course, it never does, the lesson being that for people to get along — and, by extension, for society to function — one can't simply blurt out what one thinks without regard for the consequences.
NEWS
By Michael Harris and Michael Harris,L.A. Times | October 22, 1995
"Probabilities," by Michael Stein. Permanent Press. 175 pages. $22.Michael Stein's first novel gives us a hero in the Holden Caulfield tradition - cynical on the outside, tender on the inside, too smart for his own good. He clings to the gestures but not the spirit of rebellion in an age of faded causes and sagging institutions when rebellion seems not only futile but silly. This book won't change lives as "Catcher in the Rye" did, but it's a witty and affecting debut.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
Before Green Day won over Broadway with an ambitious anti-war album, it was a simple-minded punk trio from Berkeley with an album called "Dookie" and song titles such as "Geek Stink Breath" and "Words I Might Have Ate. " While the band's sound has evolved greatly since forming in 1987, Green Day has maintained a knack for writing songs with lasting appeal. Here are five that still hold up well. "Who Wrote Holden Caulfield?" (from 1992's "Kerplunk!") This isn't the best song for name-checking the protagonist of "The Catcher in the Rye" (that honor belongs to Piebald)
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | July 19, 1993
Young people, particularly those of a certain age and sensibility, often ask me to recommend a summer reading list."Look to the classics," I tell them."
NEWS
By Dave Rosenthal and Dave Rosenthal,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com | July 5, 2009
Bravo for Deborah Batts. Last week, the federal judge barred U.S. distribution of an unauthorized sequel to The Catcher in the Rye. Her ruling was a victory for 90-year-old author J.D. Salinger, who for decades has jealously guarded his privacy - and his words. The courthouse battle in Manhattan focused on 60 Years Later: Coming Through the Rye, which tells the story of Holden Caulfield as a senior citizen. The book, written by a Swedish author, is available in Europe and was scheduled for a summer release here.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | June 7, 2009
As I noted on Read Street, the reclusive J.D. Salinger recently emerged from his self-imposed exile to try to stop publication of an unauthorized "sequel" to The Catcher in the Rye. Don't expect to see the 90-year-old Salinger in a New York federal courtroom as the literary fight develops over 60 Years Later: Coming Through the Rye, a book that has been published in Great Britain and is headed here. Years ago, Salinger battled an unauthorized biographer and the author of a fictitious interview, using lawyers as his proxy each time.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | April 9, 1993
JUST to save you a little time, the woman with her left breast partially exposed is in the upper right quadrant of the beach page of "Where's Waldo?" Waldo is, of course, the little man with the striped shirt and spectacles who wanders in the pages of his books through everything from track meets to Viking hordes, so lost in the crowd that it is a challenge for kids to find him in the illustrations.It is difficult to find the woman with the bare breast, too. But if you look real hard you can spot her just below the guys running on the beach and just above the man buried up to his neck in sand.
NEWS
By MARK MILLER | April 27, 1991
If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is when I was born, and what my childhood reading habits were like, and why it took me so long before I finally read ''The Catcher In The Rye,'' a book that most kids read in junior high or high school.Well, back then, back when I was 13, 14, 15, 16 and all, I just hated to read, if you want to know the truth. Oh, I read comic books and Time-Life picture books, magazines, the paper and stuff like that. But nothing too serious, nothing the teachers called serious literature, at least on my own.I remember in sixth grade this girl Nancy who used to read a book a week and the big deal that Mrs. Wise, our red-haired teacher, made out of it. She really did. And I also remember Michael Poston who was in the same class, and the time he looked down his nose at me behind those thick, nerdy glasses of his, acting like he was superior and smarter because he had read ''Exodus'' and I hadn't.
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