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By Boston Globe | September 13, 1992
Labor Day doesn't mean the end of festive times. The next couple of weeks proves that, and we haven't even begun foliage-season festivals.On tap in the Northeast are some special and different festivals, featuring the cultures of Japan and Scotland, cars and sailing.The clans are gathering at Loon Mountain in New Hampshire. The 17th annual New Hampshire Highland Games, the largest Scottish festival in the Northeast, will be held Friday through next Sunday. Among highlights will be a kilted gold tournament, Highland games, dances, crafts, foods, music and performances the Pipes and Drums of the Scots Guards.
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | June 24, 2012
Et cetera I'll Have Another will stand at stud in Japan I'll Have Another, the winner of the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness last month, will head to Japan to stand at stud, The New York Times reported Saturday. The owner, Paul Reddam , said Friday that a deal had been reached with Shigeyuki Okada 's Big Red Farm on the island of Hokkaido to stand I'll Have Another beginning next year's breeding season. Financial terms were not disclosed. I'll Have Another, who is based at the trainer Doug O'Neill 's stable at Hollywood Park, was retired the day before the June 9 Belmont Stakes because of a tendon injury.
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NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | October 6, 1994
TOKYO -- Masayuki Nishimura felt a tiny earthquake about 10:25 p.m. Tuesday, and then, a few moments later, a hardside-to-side shake began.Nothing unusual in that. Tremors of varying degrees vibrate through Japan daily. At the old public bath he owns in the Ikebukuro ward of Tokyo, it was a just a few more ripples in the tub. Then came the shock. He heard a crash and saw a half-dozen screaming, naked women rush out from their side of the bath.A 50-foot chimney for the heating system had fractured near where they were soaking.
NEWS
By Michael Zielenziger and Michael Zielenziger,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 4, 1997
NIBUTANI, Japan -- The salmon-skin boots and dugout canoes displayed here in the Ainu Historical Museum document the culture of an aboriginal people who have inhabited Japan for nearly 10,000 years.Until two months ago, however, the Japanese government denied this Ainu history ever existed.Now, in two landmark actions, a court and Japan's national legislature have taken the first steps to recognize that Japan's Ainu (EYE-new) people predated the Yamato race that conquered its land and systematically attempted to stamp out its existence.
NEWS
By Michael Zielenziger and Michael Zielenziger,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 4, 1997
NIBUTANI, Japan -- The salmon-skin boots and dugout canoes displayed here in the Ainu Historical Museum document the culture of an aboriginal people who have inhabited Japan for nearly 10,000 years.Until two months ago, however, the Japanese government denied this Ainu history ever existed.Now, in two landmark actions, a court and Japan's national legislature have taken the first steps to recognize that Japan's Ainu (EYE-new) people predated the Yamato race that conquered its land and systematically attempted to stamp out its existence.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | June 24, 2012
Et cetera I'll Have Another will stand at stud in Japan I'll Have Another, the winner of the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness last month, will head to Japan to stand at stud, The New York Times reported Saturday. The owner, Paul Reddam , said Friday that a deal had been reached with Shigeyuki Okada 's Big Red Farm on the island of Hokkaido to stand I'll Have Another beginning next year's breeding season. Financial terms were not disclosed. I'll Have Another, who is based at the trainer Doug O'Neill 's stable at Hollywood Park, was retired the day before the June 9 Belmont Stakes because of a tendon injury.
TRAVEL
By Chicago Tribune | February 15, 2009
Visions of Paradise National Geographic, $35 Is there heaven on earth? If so, where does it exist? That essentially was the assignment that the photographers whose work is represented in this volume were given. The book is divided into three main sections: land, water and air. Everyone, of course, has their own opinion of what makes a paradise, and the photographers here are no exception. In the land section are majestic images of the open sky country of Montana but also a cozy cafe in Paris; a pair of camels in the middle of a dust storm in Mali; and sunflowers buried under winter snow in Hokkaido, Japan.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Murphy | January 13, 1991
As the cultural, political and economic hub of Hokkaido island, Sapporo has much to see and enjoy beyond its snow festival. In its short history, this capital city has grown from a modest agricultural settlement to a vital metropolis of 1.5 million.Basically, the city is divided into three sections: the financial and political area with its banks, government buildings and hotels; the shopping and restaurant district; and the nationally famous entertainment quarter of Susukino, where neon lights illuminate dozens of nightclubs, eateries, theaters and cinemas.
FEATURES
By Jean Allen and Jean Allen,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | May 9, 1993
I will be going to Asia this summer, and have the option of staying over in Japan at the end of the tour. I'd like to stay in one of the traditional inns called ryokans. Your opinion, please.Staying at a traditional Japanese inn is a great idea for traditional Japanese, but it can be a shock for the rest of us. But do it anyway.During a visit to Japan's northern island, Hokkaido, I stayed at two ryokans (pronounced ree-OH-cuns). According to travel writers' tales, it would be like this: Live briefly as the Japanese live in their homes, savor superb food, bathe luxuriously, gain serenity in the simple beauty of a tatami-matted room.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2004
Dear old Horace Capron, he's loved in Sapporo, Japan, but neglected and all but forgotten in Laurel. He helped build both towns. The Japanese erected a statue to him in 1996 in Sapporo to honor his many splendid services in the development of the province of Hokkaido. Capron not only helped create Sapporo, now a city of 1.8 million, he more or less selected it as the capital city of Hokkaido. Just two families lived there when he arrived in 1870. Laurel is just getting around to remembering him with an exhibit at the Laurel Museum.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | October 6, 1994
TOKYO -- Masayuki Nishimura felt a tiny earthquake about 10:25 p.m. Tuesday, and then, a few moments later, a hardside-to-side shake began.Nothing unusual in that. Tremors of varying degrees vibrate through Japan daily. At the old public bath he owns in the Ikebukuro ward of Tokyo, it was a just a few more ripples in the tub. Then came the shock. He heard a crash and saw a half-dozen screaming, naked women rush out from their side of the bath.A 50-foot chimney for the heating system had fractured near where they were soaking.
FEATURES
By Boston Globe | September 13, 1992
Labor Day doesn't mean the end of festive times. The next couple of weeks proves that, and we haven't even begun foliage-season festivals.On tap in the Northeast are some special and different festivals, featuring the cultures of Japan and Scotland, cars and sailing.The clans are gathering at Loon Mountain in New Hampshire. The 17th annual New Hampshire Highland Games, the largest Scottish festival in the Northeast, will be held Friday through next Sunday. Among highlights will be a kilted gold tournament, Highland games, dances, crafts, foods, music and performances the Pipes and Drums of the Scots Guards.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 29, 1992
TOKYO -- Russia granted a Japanese-U.S. consortium yesterday the right to explore what are believed to be huge reserves of oil and gas just off Sakhalin Island, in what may be one of the biggest and, for the Japanese, politically most important business deals since the dissolution of the Soviet Union.The $8 billion to $10 billion project will be conducted by Mitsui Corp., a giant Japanese trading concern; Marathon Oil Co., which is owned by USX Corp., and McDermott International Inc., a leader in the construction of oil platforms.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 22, 2000
TOKYO -- The Russian coast guard fired on and seized a Japanese fishing boat yesterday in waters near Japan's northernmost main island, according to Japanese and Russian officials. The incident threatens to revive tensions between the countries, which have had disputes about maritime boundaries and possession of small islands in the area since World War II. Japan's new prime minister, Yoshiro Mori, is scheduled to visit the Russian president-elect, Vladimir V. Putin, in Moscow on April 29. Japan has been pressing Russia to negotiate a formal peace treaty, which it says should include the return of northern islands seized by Moscow in the closing days of the war. According to Russian officials who briefed journalists in Moscow, the Japanese fishing vessel disobeyed orders from a Russian patrol boat to stop for inspection.
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