Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHok
IN THE NEWS

Hok

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1998
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- As a company, HOK Sports Facilities Group has profited handsomely from the national trend toward single-sport stadiums.But with costs rising, the architectural firm has put itself into position to benefit from a swing back to multipurpose facilities -- if it ever comes.HOK has created a conceptual design it thinks may resolve many of the design contradictions that have driven America's premier outdoor sports away from one another.The "Smart Stadium" features a complicated system of moving seats and retractable decks that can be converted quickly from a football to a baseball configuration.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | March 24, 2008
It's close to downtown and open to the sky, and features sweeping views of the city beyond. There's an asymmetrical field with enough nooks and crannies to keep the game interesting - plus a state-of-the-art scoreboard, luxury skyboxes and all the creature comforts fans could want. Oriole Park at Camden Yards in 1992? Yes, but also Nationals Park on the Anacostia riverfront in 2008. Sixteen years after Baltimore broke the mold with its "newfangled, old-fashioned" ballpark, Washington has joined the list of cities that can boast they have a new, baseball-only stadium in a prime urban setting.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2003
The Maryland Stadium Authority yesterday began to spend the $10 million an arbitration panel awarded to the Orioles more than two years ago in their contentious "parity" dispute with the state. The stadium authority voted to pay HOK Sports $243,350 to develop specific designs for upgrades to Camden Yards. Richard W. Slosson, the authority's executive director, said he wants the changes to "retain the character of Camden Yards, but at the same time make it better." Improvements that Slosson suggested could be completed by Opening Day 2004 include adding a bar or restaurant where friends could gather while being able to see the field and "ribbon" display boards similar to those on the facade inside M&T Bank Stadium.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2003
The Maryland Stadium Authority yesterday began to spend the $10 million an arbitration panel awarded to the Orioles more than two years ago in their contentious "parity" dispute with the state. The stadium authority voted to pay HOK Sports $243,350 to develop specific designs for upgrades to Camden Yards. Richard W. Slosson, the authority's executive director, said he wants the changes to "retain the character of Camden Yards, but at the same time make it better." Improvements that Slosson suggested could be completed by Opening Day 2004 include adding a bar or restaurant where friends could gather while being able to see the field and "ribbon" display boards similar to those on the facade inside M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | July 15, 1993
If they could do it for the new ballpark, why not the police headquarters, too?That was part of the rationale articulated yesterday by members of Baltimore's Architectural and Engineering Awards Commission as they announced their first choice for a design team to take charge of a $32 million renovation and expansion of the city police headquarters.Their choice: a joint venture of RCG Inc. of Baltimore and Hellmuth Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) of Washington, a division of the firm that designed Oriole Park at Camden Yards.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Edward Gunts contributed to this article | July 12, 1996
In a move it hopes will add imaginative new elements to its much-maligned stadium, the Ravens football team has hired its own staff architects, including Janet Marie Smith, whose work on Camden Yards helped make it a national model for ballparks.The architects also are charged with seeing that the $200 million sports complex meets a tight construction deadline.The Ravens said the hiring was not influenced by weeks of public criticism of the stadium design, nor did it reflect dissatisfaction with stadium architect HOK Sports Facilities Group of Kansas City, Mo."
NEWS
June 19, 1991
Sally Cheung, 20, daughter of Hok Ming and Kok Ying Cheung of Glen Burnie, was recently appointed president of the Salisbury State University chapter of the International Association of Business Communicators.She is a 1988 graduate of Glen Burnie High School, where she ranked in the top 5 percent of her class. She is currently a senior majoring in communication arts.IABC is a professional organization for students of all majors interested in public relations and organizational communication.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 26, 2000
A $75 million plan to convert the former Montgomery Ward & Co. catalog building near Carroll Park to a business and technology park with room for more than 5,000 employees will be the subject of a noontime forum tomorrow at the Johns Hopkins University's Downtown Center, Charles and Saratoga streets. One of the building's first tenants will be the Maryland Department of the Environment. The development team plans to renovate the building as a model of environmentally sensitive design. Developer Samuel K. Himmelrich Jr, will lead the discussion, which is sponsored by the Baltimore Architecture Foundation.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2001
A statewide preservation group, with the support of Comptroller William Donald Schaefer, is making a last-ditch effort to stop the demolition of Memorial Stadium, planned to begin in the next few weeks. Preservation Maryland and three residents of Ednor Gardens, a neighborhood north of the stadium, filed an appeal yesterday with the city's Department of Housing and Community Development, asking it to pull back a demolition permit issued to Potts & Callahan. The city issued the permit after the state Board of Public Works approved a $2.6 million contract this week with the firm, which would begin tearing down the former home of the Baltimore Orioles and Colts.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | March 24, 2008
It's close to downtown and open to the sky, and features sweeping views of the city beyond. There's an asymmetrical field with enough nooks and crannies to keep the game interesting - plus a state-of-the-art scoreboard, luxury skyboxes and all the creature comforts fans could want. Oriole Park at Camden Yards in 1992? Yes, but also Nationals Park on the Anacostia riverfront in 2008. Sixteen years after Baltimore broke the mold with its "newfangled, old-fashioned" ballpark, Washington has joined the list of cities that can boast they have a new, baseball-only stadium in a prime urban setting.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2001
A statewide preservation group, with the support of Comptroller William Donald Schaefer, is making a last-ditch effort to stop the demolition of Memorial Stadium, planned to begin in the next few weeks. Preservation Maryland and three residents of Ednor Gardens, a neighborhood north of the stadium, filed an appeal yesterday with the city's Department of Housing and Community Development, asking it to pull back a demolition permit issued to Potts & Callahan. The city issued the permit after the state Board of Public Works approved a $2.6 million contract this week with the firm, which would begin tearing down the former home of the Baltimore Orioles and Colts.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 26, 2000
A $75 million plan to convert the former Montgomery Ward & Co. catalog building near Carroll Park to a business and technology park with room for more than 5,000 employees will be the subject of a noontime forum tomorrow at the Johns Hopkins University's Downtown Center, Charles and Saratoga streets. One of the building's first tenants will be the Maryland Department of the Environment. The development team plans to renovate the building as a model of environmentally sensitive design. Developer Samuel K. Himmelrich Jr, will lead the discussion, which is sponsored by the Baltimore Architecture Foundation.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | August 7, 1998
The red brick walls are there. So are the arched gateways and wide concourses that offer sweeping views of the city.But the real story of the Baltimore Ravens' $220 million football stadium is not how much it has in common with its acclaimed green cousin to the north, Oriole Park at Camden Yards. It's how different the two turned out to be -- in size, scale and character.Although there is a certain resemblance between the two structures, visitors will discover, starting with tomorrow's preseason opener, that the Ravens' home is a bird of a different feather.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1998
He had seen samples of the bricks to be used on the Ravens stadium long ago. But beholding the collage of masonry, green glass, pewter-colored steel and thousands of fans surprised the stadium's chief designer."
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1998
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- As a company, HOK Sports Facilities Group has profited handsomely from the national trend toward single-sport stadiums.But with costs rising, the architectural firm has put itself into position to benefit from a swing back to multipurpose facilities -- if it ever comes.HOK has created a conceptual design it thinks may resolve many of the design contradictions that have driven America's premier outdoor sports away from one another.The "Smart Stadium" features a complicated system of moving seats and retractable decks that can be converted quickly from a football to a baseball configuration.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1998
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Peter Friederich has a job any kid would love.He makes models.The chief model builder for HOK Sports Facilities Group, the world's leading designer of stadiums and arenas, handcrafts each of the intricate miniatures that pops up at every news conference when someone announces a new stadium.Sometimes the real stadium never gets built, but that doesn't bother Friederich.At one time, such architectural models were used to test design ideas and proportions. In the age of computer-assisted design, however, they aren't really needed for that anymore.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1998
He had seen samples of the bricks to be used on the Ravens stadium long ago. But beholding the collage of masonry, green glass, pewter-colored steel and thousands of fans surprised the stadium's chief designer."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | August 7, 1998
The red brick walls are there. So are the arched gateways and wide concourses that offer sweeping views of the city.But the real story of the Baltimore Ravens' $220 million football stadium is not how much it has in common with its acclaimed green cousin to the north, Oriole Park at Camden Yards. It's how different the two turned out to be -- in size, scale and character.Although there is a certain resemblance between the two structures, visitors will discover, starting with tomorrow's preseason opener, that the Ravens' home is a bird of a different feather.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Edward Gunts contributed to this article | July 12, 1996
In a move it hopes will add imaginative new elements to its much-maligned stadium, the Ravens football team has hired its own staff architects, including Janet Marie Smith, whose work on Camden Yards helped make it a national model for ballparks.The architects also are charged with seeing that the $200 million sports complex meets a tight construction deadline.The Ravens said the hiring was not influenced by weeks of public criticism of the stadium design, nor did it reflect dissatisfaction with stadium architect HOK Sports Facilities Group of Kansas City, Mo."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | July 15, 1993
If they could do it for the new ballpark, why not the police headquarters, too?That was part of the rationale articulated yesterday by members of Baltimore's Architectural and Engineering Awards Commission as they announced their first choice for a design team to take charge of a $32 million renovation and expansion of the city police headquarters.Their choice: a joint venture of RCG Inc. of Baltimore and Hellmuth Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) of Washington, a division of the firm that designed Oriole Park at Camden Yards.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.