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By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | March 28, 1994
DALLAS -- Give them the trophy. Tell their fans to head straight for Fayetteville and start the celebration. And make out those Rose Garden invitations, because Bill Clinton's beloved Hogs are coming to Washington.If this weekend's victories in the NCAA Midwest Regional at Reunion Arena weren't enough to convince the skeptics, consider what Nolan Richardson said about his Arkansas Razorbacks yesterday."I don't know if we're the most talented team in the country," Richardson said after his top-seeded Razorbacks beat third-seeded Michigan, 76-68, to advance to this week's Final Four in Charlotte, N.C. "But if we play up to the very best of our potential, we'll win the national championship."
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Tim Wheeler | September 16, 2013
Living by a hog farm or near crop fields fertilized with the animals' manure can raise your risk of getting a drug-resistant infection, a new study finds. Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found a link in Pennsylvania between intensive hog farming and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA. In poring over medical records of more than 446,000 Pennsylvanians in the Geisinger Health System , the researchers found 3,000 patients with MRSA and 50,000 with skin and soft-tissue infections from 2005 through 2010.  Of the MRSA cases, 1,539 were community-acquired and 1,335 deemed hospital-acquired.
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NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | May 19, 1991
Julie Feeser's challenge: To get lean pork chops, ham and bacon on your plate.Her tools: sows that weigh between 350 and 650 pounds and spend most of their days lounging, and boars that weigh at least that much and foam at the mouth to display their masculinity.The result: cute piglets with tiny snouts and curlicue tails thatplay with each other in their pens and stare shyly but curiously at visitors when interrupted.The whole process stinks.But that'sto be expected when 4,000 hogs pass through the Feesers' barns everyyear.
NEWS
August 29, 2012
I am outraged to read the article in The Sun ("City schools officials play loose with credit," Aug. 26) regarding credit card charges in the amount of $500,000 incurred by Baltimore City school officials. Thousands of dollars were spent on very questionable purchases, including gourmet catering, outrageously expensive hotels, extremely high-end restaurants, gifts, office showers, etc. This is a profligate waste of taxpayer money and is especially disturbing in light of the actual situation of classroom teachers.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2000
The Baltimore Zoo plans to put on a new face this weekend, wart hogs and all. Tomorrow, zoo officials are slated to unveil a new wart hog exhibit for the first time in nearly 50 years. Brother wart hogs Frasier and Niles will make themselves at home under the trees and in the dry riverbed near the antelopes and gazelles. Far from their natural home south of the Sahara Desert, they'll be on display with a white baby camel named Lucky, born at the zoo May 2. Since the wart hogs arrived last month, horticulture and maintenance workers have been building a lush 1-acre habitat to resemble an African jungle.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1997
A proposal to raise 3,000 hogs in a warehouse in Kent County has sparked protests from environmentalists, local officials and other farmers on the rural Upper Eastern Shore, who contend that such modern "factory" farming threatens drinking water and the Chesapeake Bay.Anthony Guessregen and Patricia Downs, owners of the 328-acre Willow Pond Farm near Millington, are seeking a state permit to spray their fields annually with more than 4 million gallons of...
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 1, 1992
The Hogs are going to be on the auction block the next two months, but they probably can't be bought for any price.When the Washington Redskins submit their 37-man Plan B protected list to the NFL office today, nine veterans -- including the four remaining original Hogs -- are expected to be left unprotected in a strategic move by the club so they can protect younger players.Three Super Bowl starters, tight end Don Warren, a 13-year-veteran, center Jeff Bostic, a 12-year veteran and right tackle Joe Jacoby, an 11-year veteran, are among the nine veterans who are expected to be left unprotected by the club.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2004
ASHBURN, Va. - In 1982, Joe Bugel, a Washington Redskins offensive coach, wanted to distinguish his beefy linemen from the rest of the team, make them feel significant. He could have bought them ties or taken them to dinner. But this was the NFL, so he gave them T-shirts depicting a nasty-looking razorback and christened his men "The Hogs." The line loved it. Twenty-two years later, Bugel and head coach Joe Gibbs have returned to the Redskins, bent on creating a new line in the image of the old one. Bugel calls the unit the "Dirtbags."
NEWS
By SUN RESEARCHER SHELIA JACKSON | October 2, 2005
1896: BANNING HOGS IN CITY On Oct. 7, 1895, the mayor and Common Council of Westminster listened as Carroll County's health officer, Dr. J. Howell Billingslea, presented evidence for the prohibition of keeping hogs within city limits. Dr. Billingslea stated that no matter how clean the hog pens are kept, they are still a breeding ground for disease and thus a public health hazard. Officials were impressed with Billingslea's report and decided to take up the issue at a future meeting. The anticipated date for the prohibition of hogs within city limits was Jan. 1, 1896.
NEWS
September 26, 2001
Feisty hogs These pigs are descendants of Spanish pigs that were left on an island off Georgia by explorers to use as food for future expeditions. Their coloration ranges from black to spotted red and tan. what's for Roots, grass and berries. do you KNOW? What are these hogs best known for? Answer: Ossabaw hogs have an aggressive nature and tough attitude. learn MORE! Visit the Ossabaw Island hog in the farmyard at the Baltimore Zoo. Read Charlotte's Web by E.B. White. WILD FACTS 1. Females are pregnant for 3 months, 3 weeks and 3 days.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2012
The nerd in me says books but rest of me wants bacon. Mmm … bacon. Luke Broadwater, reporter, The Baltimore Sun A zombified Bea Arthur would add the celebrity element an event like this cries out for. Anne Tallent, editor, b Break dancing, just because. Wesley Case, reporter, b Bed, Bath & Beyond. Shopping is always more fun with a little Bourbon on board. Pick up some barware and napkins to wipe the BBQ sauce off your fingers.
SPORTS
Matt Murschel | October 3, 2011
It's never over until it's over. Arkansas and Illinois rallied from double-digit deficits for exciting wins over Texas A&M and Northwestern, respectively. Navy and TCU also had big rallies but fell short in overtime. The Luke Fickell Era may be a footnote in Ohio State history. At 3-2 and with an offense that looks like it couldn't score against a JV squad, the Buckeyes have plenty of problems. Throw in games against Nebraska, Illinois and Wisconsin this month and that could spell trouble for the first-year coach.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2011
A young red river hog named Thomu, an animal which is also known as a bush pig, stands next to his mother, Dagamba in their habitat at the Berlin zoo on August 12. The piglet was born at the zoo on July 16. In the wild, red river hogs typically live in herds of six to 20 members led by a dominant boar. Photo by TOBIAS KLEINSCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzzella, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2011
Chef Winston Blick of Clementine has heads in his freezer. And hearts. And legs. The legs have hooves on them, and the other body parts come from animals, too, so no need to call the authorities. The only emergency is the freezer-space kind. Blick is running out of room for the big hunks of pig he has on his hands as a result of the laudable, but in some ways confounding, locavore dining trend. More and more chefs, tapping into the local-foods movement, are getting their pork, beef and other meats straight from nearby farmers instead from of far-off factory farms.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzzella | January 8, 2011
Winston Blick has heads in his freezer. And hearts. And legs. The legs have hooves on them, and the other body parts come from animals, too, so no need to call the authorities. The only emergency is the freezer-space kind. Blick is running out of room for the big hunks of pig he has on his hands as a result of the laudable, but in some ways confounding, locavore dining trend. More and more chefs, tapping into the local-foods movement, are getting their pork, beef and other meats straight from nearby farmers instead of far-off factory farms.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 13, 2010
For all the skeptics and snarlygasters who doubt that Gerald Winegrad's July BGE bill could be only $18.26, I present the former state senator and longtime conservationist to provide response and additional details. (A snarlygaster is a person who anonymously posts nasty and often ignorant comments at the end of stories and columns on newspaper websites. It's a play on snallygaster, which is the legendary monster said to lurk in Western Maryland mountains.) Last Thursday in this space, Mr. Winegrad offered his $18.26 bill as testament to his personal effort to conserve energy and to show other Maryland consumers how we can save on our utility bills.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 12, 1990
LAUREL -- The seventh event at Laurel Race Course yesterday was just an ordinary maiden race. But for the friends and family of Chris Fabifzak, it was a race they never will forget.Fabifzak, 32, who had worked as a groom for trainer Joe Devereux the past three years, died early Friday in Baltimore. A large, jovial, ruddy man, he was the spiritual leader of the J.D. Hogs, an informal, fun-loving group named for friends and employees of Devereux's."He was the type of guy who would do anything for anybody," said Terry Kupfer, one of the Hogs.
NEWS
April 10, 1991
An Edgewater man exchanged shots with county police Monday night before barricading himself in his home for almost 14 hours.No one was injured during the shootout outside the home of William Elben, 84, in the 400 block of Plainview Avenue.County police said officers were called to Elben's home at about 6:30 a.m. by neighbors who reported he was firing gunshots in the air.Officer Richard Lesniewski walked around to the back of the homeand found Elben armed with a double-barreled shotgun.He pointed the gun at Lesniewski; both men fired simultaneously, but neither was hit, police said.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | August 21, 2009
Jennifer Debnam cringes every time she hears a television report or reads a newspaper article about the H1N1 flu pandemic and - inevitably - comes to the part where the disease is called "swine flu." Debnam raises 12,000 hogs a year on her family's Kent County farm and she, like others in the industry, is losing megabucks this year - which they attribute to the misperception that you can catch flu from eating pork chops or a plate of ribs. Exports (and prices) are down sharply as Russia and China have put major restrictions on American pork products after questioning the health of the nation's hog population, experts said.
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