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By New York Times News Service | August 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Tom Leedham, head of a Teamsters local in Oregon, is taking on the biggest name in labor: Hoffa. Leedham is seeking to unseat James P. Hoffa, the president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters and the son of the nation's most famous - some would say infamous - union leader, James R. Hoffa, who disappeared in 1975. Even though Leedham faces an uphill battle, on Friday night he was able to claim a victory in one round at least - Hoffa dodged the one debate that was scheduled between the two sides.
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NEWS
December 14, 2008
RON CAREY, 72 Former Teamsters president Ron Carey, the former Teamsters president who pledged to rid the union of mob corruption but was later forced from leadership in a financial scandal, died Thursday at New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens of complications from lung cancer, his son Daniel Carey said. After a stint in the Marines, Mr. Carey joined the Teamsters in 1956 while working as a driver for United Parcel Service. He became president of a local union post in New York in 1967 on a platform of challenging corrupt leadership in the organization.
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NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | January 15, 1992
Washington -- Funny how sensible explanations of traumatic events are ignored while wild-eyed tales thrive and multiply. Funny, but understandable, if major money is involved.The splashiest version of how and why John Kennedy was killed is the current movie which maintains that Lyndon Johnson, the CIA, the FBI, the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard and by logical extension the American Legion, Kiwanis, Boy Scouts and Baptist Ladies Sewing Circle were in on the conspiracy.Amid all the furor the movie has stirred, the often sensational New York Post has revived a version that seems absolutely calm and credible by contrast.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Tom Leedham, head of a Teamsters local in Oregon, is taking on the biggest name in labor: Hoffa. Leedham is seeking to unseat James P. Hoffa, the president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters and the son of the nation's most famous - some would say infamous - union leader, James R. Hoffa, who disappeared in 1975. Even though Leedham faces an uphill battle, on Friday night he was able to claim a victory in one round at least - Hoffa dodged the one debate that was scheduled between the two sides.
NEWS
December 9, 1998
The following editorial appeared in the Chicago Tribune yesterday:James P. Hoffa owes his election as president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters largely to the fact that he is Jimmy Hoffa's son. After all these years, the Hoffa name is still legendary in labor circles. But the name and what it stands for are also the reasons the son's election to head this deeply troubled union raises concerns.It is, of course, a different time and place from when the father embodied the power of a union with 2.3 million members, a bulging war chest and the capacity to shut down corporate America.
NEWS
By TIM JONES and TIM JONES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 31, 2006
Where's Jimmy Hoffa? Apparently not on the grounds of a suburban Detroit horse farm. Nearly two weeks after the FBI acted on what it called the best recent tip on the whereabouts of the missing former Teamsters Union boss, agents ended a "thorough and comprehensive search" yesterday without finding any evidence of Hoffa's body. While giving up the dig of property in Milford Township, about 35 miles northwest of Detroit, Judy Chilen, assistant special agent in charge of the FBI's Detroit office, said she thinks Hoffa's body had been buried on the Hidden Dreams Farm, although she could offer no evidence that it had been moved.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | December 25, 1992
"Hoffa" appears made for the smallest of all possible audiences, America's shrinking population of big game hunters. And why big game hunters? Because they alone among us seem to like things that are both large and dead.The movie is a corpse. It's a fish that stinks from the head. They ought to bury it in the Jersey Meadowlands.It never begins to build a case that its hero, Teamsters boss and tough guy Jimmy Hoffa, is worthy of the time and money the film lavishes on him. It has no theory of his personality, it offers no coherent account of his life and times, it's not a revisionist screed arguing his innocence on pension fund fraud, and it can't begin to evoke the romantic idealism that caused working men to risk everything to build a union.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 1, 1998
As soon as James P. Hoffa entered the smoke-filled bar in South Philadelphia, 80 Teamsters burst into wild applause, with several rushing up to ask him for an autograph."
BUSINESS
By NEWSDAY NTC | July 20, 1996
PHILADELPHIA -- The weeklong Teamsters convention ended yesterday with the union's president, Ronald Carey, emerging as the victor over rival James P. Hoffa in their battle over the financing of the union.After five days of successfully blunting votes on Hoffa's proposed constitutional changes, Carey, to the chagrin of his opposition, gaveled the convention to a close.The end came despite unfinished business.Hoffa had a clear majority of the 1,800 delegate votes, but Carey held the upper hand because he chaired the convention.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1996
James Hoffa Jr. -- the son of the Teamsters leader whose disappearance 21 years ago remains one of this century's great mysteries -- came to Baltimore yesterday in his yearlong quest to land his father's former job.Mr. Hoffa, 54, is challenging Teamsters President Ron Carey, credited in some quarters with cleaning corruption and fiscal mismanagement out of the 1.4 million member-union, in what is shaping up as a spirited, if not contentious, race.Ballotting, which will have government oversight, will take place by mail in November.
NEWS
By TIM JONES and TIM JONES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 31, 2006
Where's Jimmy Hoffa? Apparently not on the grounds of a suburban Detroit horse farm. Nearly two weeks after the FBI acted on what it called the best recent tip on the whereabouts of the missing former Teamsters Union boss, agents ended a "thorough and comprehensive search" yesterday without finding any evidence of Hoffa's body. While giving up the dig of property in Milford Township, about 35 miles northwest of Detroit, Judy Chilen, assistant special agent in charge of the FBI's Detroit office, said she thinks Hoffa's body had been buried on the Hidden Dreams Farm, although she could offer no evidence that it had been moved.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | May 24, 2006
Drivers and attendants employed by the city school system's largest bus contractor, First Student Inc., met with Teamsters officials at a rally yesterday and then marched onto their employer's bus lot to demand improved bus maintenance and health benefits. "Time after time we have asked First Student to respect us," said Sheila Wactor, a First Student bus driver who supports joining the union. "The way to make a change is to vote `yes' [for the union]." Leading the event at the lot in White Marsh was Jim Hoffa, general president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters and the son of Jimmy Hoffa, the Teamsters' leader who mysteriously vanished 31 years ago and is presumed dead.
NEWS
May 19, 2006
On the same day that the FBI was digging up a horse farm in Michigan in renewed hopes of finding the body of James Hoffa, another mystery dig came to light in Scotland, where a volunteer crew that went to the top of Britain's highest mountain to collect litter found a piano buried in the stony slope. Sometimes it's the seekers who command admiration, as with the tireless G-men, and sometimes it's the hiders. Here was a grand musical instrument buried on a high mountain summit because, well, why not?
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2004
For nearly 30 years, the story has been retold, and it rings especially familiar to New York football fans. Beneath the end zone at Giants Stadium lies the body of Jimmy Hoffa, the former Teamsters union chief who disappeared in Michigan one summer day in 1975 and was never heard from again. Sportscasters still bring up the ghost of Hoffa when bad luck strikes the Giants or the Jets, who share the East Rutherford, N.J., facility as a home field. Long before he became an expert on sports, culture and politics at Duke University, professor Grant Farred grew up as a rabid Giants fan and spent his share of Sundays at the Meadowlands.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 11, 2001
DETROIT - The FBI tried during the weekend to persuade Charles "Chuckie" O'Brien to take a lie-detector test regarding the disappearance of former Teamsters boss Jimmy Hoffa, according to a letter that O'Brien's lawyer said came from an agent. William Bufalino II said O'Brien received the letter Sunday from agent Andrew Sluss, who also wrote to O'Brien five years ago and said he didn't consider him a suspect in the case. The new letter suggests O'Brien could clear his name if he can pass an FBI polygraph test.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 19, 2001
DETROIT - The Machus Red Fox, the dingy old restaurant in suburban Detroit where Teamster legend Jimmy Hoffa was last seen alive, is now a gourmet trattoria with a hand-painted chandelier and sunflower-filled urns. Instead of cutting underworld deals, patrons watch stock tickers on the bar TVs. And the grand Book Cadillac Hotel, where Hoffa lunched with then-Detroit Mayor Coleman Young the day before he disappeared, stands vacant in the city's barren downtown, with graffiti that ask, "What now?"
BUSINESS
By BOSTON GLOBE | December 9, 1997
A group of reform-minded candidates have captured the top seats in a closely watched Chicago union election, suggesting there is still support for the dissident wing that catapulted Teamsters President Ron Carey into office late last year.Gerald Zero, secretary-treasurer of Local 705 in Chicago and a Carey supporter, was re-elected to the post with 3,506 votes in a race that pitted him against Dane Passo, a staunch supporter of James P. Hoffa.Passo received 3,271 of the mail ballots cast.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 11, 2001
DETROIT - The FBI tried during the weekend to persuade Charles "Chuckie" O'Brien to take a lie-detector test regarding the disappearance of former Teamsters boss Jimmy Hoffa, according to a letter that O'Brien's lawyer said came from an agent. William Bufalino II said O'Brien received the letter Sunday from agent Andrew Sluss, who also wrote to O'Brien five years ago and said he didn't consider him a suspect in the case. The new letter suggests O'Brien could clear his name if he can pass an FBI polygraph test.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 5, 2001
DETROIT - At the end, with his kidneys shot and his heart failing, mobster Anthony Giacalone's moment of fame was a fading memory. His one-time world of big cars and bookies, of sleek suits and shakedowns, was, if not in ruins, then at the very least aging and vulnerable, with a few outright bumblers in the ranks. "Nitwit Incorporated," one defense attorney called them, referring to two wise guys in Giacalone's gang whose misadventures were taped by the FBI. They botched appointments, got lost, fretted over gun permits, and blithely wondered aloud - as recorders rolled - whether anyone was eavesdropping.
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