Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHoey
IN THE NEWS

Hoey

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 16, 2005
On August 9, 2005, ROBIN MAE HOEY, 36, of Baltimore, MD. In loving memory. You will always be in our hearts. Friends may call at the LOUDON PARK FUNERAL HOME, 3620 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, on Tuesday from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 P.M., where a funeral service will be held Wednesday at 11 A.M. Interment Loudon Park Cemetery.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2013
Doris Mae Hoey Snyder, an Annapolis resident who performed as the head majorette for the Baltimore Colts Marching Band and later formed the Washington Redskinettes, died Dec. 18 at the Baltimore Washington Medical Center after suffering an aortic dissection. She was 85. Mrs. Snyder was born in Baltimore. She grew up in Pigtown and attended Southern High School in Federal Hill, where she learned her majorette skills, and Anne Arundel Community College. She became a majorette for the Colts Marching Band in 1947, one of six original members of the group.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 2, 2002
John G. Hoey Sr., a retired insurance salesman who earned the Distinguished Flying Cross while serving in the Royal Air Force during World War II, died of heart failure Thursday at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 84. Mr. Hoey, a longtime resident of Keswick Road in Roland Park, was born and raised in Dublin, Ireland. After graduating from high school, he left Ireland for England, and enlisted in the RAF in 1938. As a radio operator and bombardier, he made history when he was aboard one of the first planes to bomb Germany.
SPORTS
By La Velle E. Neal III, Star Tribune | April 19, 2011
Jim Hoey got the call to the majors Sunday while Class AAA Rochester was in Scranton. He left Scranton for Philadelphia -- but missed his connecting flight to Baltimore, so he didn't arrive in Charm City until 12:30 a.m. Monday. It was plenty of time for the right-hander to think about how he would approach his former team. "The last two games of spring training they were just sitting dead-red fastball," Hoey said. "I wanted to show them tonight that you can't do that. " So Hoey, with a fastball that hit 97 miles per hour on the Camden Yards radar gun Monday, opened with a split-fingered fastball to Derek Lee, then got him to fly out to end the seventh.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau of The Sun | March 14, 1991
NEW YORK -- It was in the abysmal days of 1981, when bonds were worth about as much as wallpaper and some people thought they were headed lower still, that economist Richard Hoey opined that the market was at a 100-year low. In 1982, when the country was in a steep recession, he forecast an imminent recovery, later adding it would last a postwar record seven years.The duration of the bond market forecast alone would make Mr. Hoey stand out ("it was the most unhedged forecast given by a Wall Street economist ever," he asserts)
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,Sun Reporter | September 4, 2006
OAKLAND, CALIF. -- Orioles shortstop Miguel Tejada said around this time last year that he thought it was time for his consecutive-games streak to end. But entering yesterday, the streak, which has reached 1,054 games, is still alive and showing no signs of stopping. Wanting to give his star shortstop a rest, Orioles manager Sam Perlozzo put Tejada into the lineup at designated hitter yesterday. It was the 10th time this season Tejada has been the DH, an idea that the 30-year-old at least appears to be warming up to. "I don't like it, but I've got to do it," said Tejada, who before this season had been the DH twice in his career.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Roch Kubatko and Jeff Zrebiec and Roch Kubatko,Sun reporters | March 14, 2008
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Reliever Jim Hoey returned to Baltimore on Wednesday to have a magnetic resonance imaging of his right shoulder, an examination that revealed no structural damage but won't help his chances to make the team's Opening Day bullpen. "We got a good report on Jim," Orioles president of baseball operations Andy MacPhail said. "I don't know how long it's going to be, but the MRI didn't reveal anything of any structural concerns. I don't know whether it's a week, three weeks or what.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN REPORTER | May 15, 2008
Orioles reliever Jim Hoey won't pitch this season after undergoing surgery May 4 in Baltimore to repair torn cartilage and clean out debris from his right shoulder. Hoey, who appeared in 23 games with the Orioles last year, assumed that the arthroscopic procedure only would involve removing debris from the shoulder after magnetic resonance imagings and an arthrogram - when dye is injected in the affected area - didn't reveal any tears. But team orthopedist Dr. James Wilckens discovered a tear of the labrum behind the pitcher's shoulder that was significant enough to require three anchors to hold it down.
SPORTS
By Dan Igo and Dan Igo,Sun Reporter | June 18, 2007
Brian Burres was scheduled to start in Saturday night's game but was pushed back a day because of soreness in his throwing arm. That extra day's rest was just what the left-hander needed. After a shaky first two innings, when he gave up three runs, including two homers, Burres settled down, giving the Orioles seven strong innings of five-hit ball. The seven innings were a career high, as were his nine strikeouts. He also retired 15 hitters in a row starting in the second inning. In the seventh, Burres walked Augie Ojeda with two outs.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2011
Jim Hoey made his major league debut with the Orioles against the Minnesota Twins at Camden Yards in August 2006. Flash forward more than four years, past 35 primarily nondescript relief appearances, a shoulder injury, an exhausting rehabilitation and a trade. On Monday, Hoey finally made it back to the majors for the first time since September 2007. Again, he was at Camden Yards, this time pitching for the Twins against the Orioles. "Coming back was ironic," said Hoey, who was promoted to help fill the Twins' late-inning void now that former closer Joe Nathan has been put in lower-pressure situations.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN REPORTER | May 15, 2008
Orioles reliever Jim Hoey won't pitch this season after undergoing surgery May 4 in Baltimore to repair torn cartilage and clean out debris from his right shoulder. Hoey, who appeared in 23 games with the Orioles last year, assumed that the arthroscopic procedure only would involve removing debris from the shoulder after magnetic resonance imagings and an arthrogram - when dye is injected in the affected area - didn't reveal any tears. But team orthopedist Dr. James Wilckens discovered a tear of the labrum behind the pitcher's shoulder that was significant enough to require three anchors to hold it down.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Roch Kubatko and Jeff Zrebiec and Roch Kubatko,Sun reporters | March 14, 2008
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Reliever Jim Hoey returned to Baltimore on Wednesday to have a magnetic resonance imaging of his right shoulder, an examination that revealed no structural damage but won't help his chances to make the team's Opening Day bullpen. "We got a good report on Jim," Orioles president of baseball operations Andy MacPhail said. "I don't know how long it's going to be, but the MRI didn't reveal anything of any structural concerns. I don't know whether it's a week, three weeks or what.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,Sun reporter | February 24, 2008
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Reliever George Sherrill was shut down yesterday after tweaking his right hamstring during Friday morning's workout, and he will likely remain inactive for a few more days as a precaution. Sherrill felt his hamstring tighten as he covered first base during a drill on the back fields. He walked to the clubhouse with assistant athletic trainer Brian Ebel and received treatment before leaving the ballpark. "It should be a few days and I'll be back," he said. "It's so soon, I'll just take today completely off, and we'll go from there."
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN REPORTER | September 14, 2007
Music blared from the speakers at Camden Yards yesterday while the Orioles gathered to stretch along the right-field line, but manager Dave Trembley wasn't in a partying mood. He marched over to the group, summoned his coaches to join him and conducted a meeting - held with no background noise once the tunes were nixed - like none other this season. Trembley wanted to be heard, which meant no heavy metal until after his five minutes were up. He informed the team of his three-game suspension, which he immediately began serving, and implored them to keep working hard and not use unfavorable calls from the umpires, which seem to strike with regularity, as an excuse.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN REPORTER | August 30, 2007
The Orioles were able to divert their attention from their beleaguered bullpen yesterday, but only so they could attempt to patch up their rotation. The club still has problems with its pitching staff. They've just expanded. Erik Bedard won't make Saturday's start in Boston because of a strained right oblique muscle. Rookie Garrett Olson will rejoin the team after a brief stint at Rookie-level Bluefield to take Bedard's turn. "He has marked improvement today," manager Dave Trembley said, "but I'm going to skip him a start."
SPORTS
By JEFF ZREBIEC | August 19, 2007
TRACHSEL CONTROLS JAYS Steve Trachsel maintains that he had not spent much time thinking about his winless streak, which extended for about 2 1/2 months and a span of nine starts. But Trachsel found the perfect opponent to break the streak. With 6 2/3 solid innings against Toronto, Trachsel won for the first time since June 8. He is 3-0 with a 3.00 ERA against Toronto this season and 6-0 with a 3.13 ERA in eight career starts against them. HOEY, BAEZ HOLD IT DOWN Trachsel's fate was again in the hands of the Orioles' bullpen, which delivered as Jim Hoey and Danys Baez pitched the last 2 1/3 innings without giving up a run. Hoey entered the game with two outs in the seventh to face the potential go-ahead run in the form of pinch hitter Vernon Wells.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | August 19, 2007
I understand why Orioles manager Dave Trembley doesn't want to force Jim Hoey into the closer's role. Heck, I didn't even want him in the majors until the bullpen started imploding again. But I'll stick with my earlier statement that the team should begin evaluating him in the ninth inning as the final weeks tick down. What could it hurt? His confidence? He has been drilled at this level before and made it back. Right now, it's good to see him having success in the seventh and eighth innings.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.