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Hodgkin S Disease

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By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | December 23, 1993
Joseph W. Rutter Sr., a career Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. worker and father of the county planning director, died Tuesday of heart failure at his home in Ellicott City.Mr. Rutter, 83, who in retirement helped start the county's Meals on Wheels program, helped support his family from the age of 7, when he tied paper flowers for burials. He retired in 1974 from the underground engineering department at BG&E.Joseph W. Rutter Jr., the county planning and zoning director, said yesterday that it was that work ethic his father passed on to his sons.
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NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1999
Every day, she felt exhausted, sick to her stomach -- and thrilled. After six years of trying to have another child and finally giving up hope, Andra Bowles discovered she was pregnant.But as the weeks passed last winter, she struggled to catch her breath. Soon, she couldn't even walk on her own.Doctors finally found the problem: Bowles, 39, had a malignant tumor larger than an apple in her chest. The diagnosis was Hodgkin's disease. Her unborn baby was, medically, a complication.As her physicians broke the news that Good Friday, Bowles' husband, Darrell, grabbed her hand and held it tight.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | May 20, 1994
Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the disease that killed Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, is an increasingly common form of cancer that often responds to treatment but proves tragically persistent in many cases.It is a cancer of the lymph system, the network of nodes and vessels that plays a major role in protecting the body against infection.The cancer usually appears first as a painless swelling of lymph nodes clustered in the neck, armpit or groin, but it can also attack solid organs first.Early symptoms can also include anemia, weight loss and fever.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 7, 1999
Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the cancer that struck King Hussein of Jordan, comes in many forms. While the prognosis varies significantly according to the type, any form can act unpredictably.Some such cancers wax and wane over years. Many people live for decades, hardly bothered by their lymphoma. Some may not need treatment for long periods.Many others, like the king, develop a form that is highly aggressive and succumb swiftly, even after they have an apparently successful bone marrow transplant and other powerful but risky therapies.
NEWS
By Bill Soiffer | July 25, 1991
THIS YEAR marks the 20th anniversary of the federal government's "war on cancer." It also marks 15 years since I was diagnosed with Hodgkin's disease, the most common form of cancer among young adults. Then, the fear of protracted misery and death implicitly accompanied the diagnosis.I survived the cancer, but the thought of a relapse was always there. Almost five years later, the nightmare came true. The cancer returned, not once but several times.Chemotherapy and radiation therapy over the years, and then a bone marrow transplant in 1988, have won me remissions.
SPORTS
By Newsday | January 14, 1993
NEW YORK -- As Mario Lemieux begins intensive, exhaustive treatment that is bound to weaken even the greatest hockey player in the world, doctors and people who have overcome Hodgkin's disease assert he has a good chance to recover and rejoin the Pittsburgh Penguins -- a team that is used to a mix of hockey and reality.Lemieux, who was found to have the cancer this week and has started radiation treatment, spent an hour yesterday customarily leading the team he has helped carry to two straight Stanley Cup championships.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | December 27, 1994
Yes, boys and girls, it's that time of year again. If you haven't already, prepare to have sports reviews of the fast-fading year thrust in your path electronically or in print, soon to be followed by copious predictions about what lies ahead in 1995.Chestnuts roasting on an open fire . . . tra-la.Normally, no matter what scandalous, foolish or inane happenings occur during the preceding 12 months, there's no problem picking out a set of highlights or inspiring moments to dwell on and go all dewy-eyed about.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | December 3, 1991
Q: My brother was recently told that he has Hodgkin's disease. I would appreciate more information on this disease and how it is treated.A: Hodgkin's disease is a type of lymphoma (malignant tumors of the lymphatic system) that includes lymph nodes and the spleen. Hodgkin's disease accounts for about one in 100 cancers in this country, and most commonly occurs in people between the ages of 15 and 35, or older than 50. Painless, progressive enlargement of lymph nodes in the neck is often the first manifestation of the disease.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | March 29, 1994
Q: Our 25-year-old son had been perfectly well but went to our family doctor because of enlarged lymph glands in his neck. A diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease was made by examining one of the glands after its removal. We were shocked and understand that Hodgkin's disease is a form of cancer. We would like to know our son's chances of being cured.A: Hodgkin's disease belongs to a group of lymphatic tissue growths, or neoplasms, collectively called the malignant lymphomas. Specific findings during the microscopic examination of tissue distinguishes Hodgkin's disease from other types of lymphomas, termed non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, which are more common and generally more cancerous.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | January 21, 1992
Q: I know a cholesterol level less than 200 is desirable in adults, but how about teen-agers? My son has a cholesterol level of 185. Is that OK for a 16-year-old?A: A panel examining blood cholesterol levels in children and adolescents, has proposed a cholesterol less than 170 is desirable, a cholesterol of 200 or greater is high, and those in between are borderline. Because your son's cholesterol is borderline, the panel would recommend he have a second cholesterol test. If that value is also borderline or high, he should have further tests for triglycerides and HDL cholesterol after an overnight fast to determine whether the "bad" LDL cholesterol is elevated.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF Sun researcher Paul McCardell contributed to this article | June 18, 1997
As outfielder Eric Davis begins his recovery from colon cancer, he can gain inspiration and courage from the likes of Olympic gold-medal wrestler Jeff Blatnick, veteran golfer Paul Azinger and hockey great Mario Lemieux, all of whom overcame cancer to resume their athletic careers."
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | December 27, 1994
Yes, boys and girls, it's that time of year again. If you haven't already, prepare to have sports reviews of the fast-fading year thrust in your path electronically or in print, soon to be followed by copious predictions about what lies ahead in 1995.Chestnuts roasting on an open fire . . . tra-la.Normally, no matter what scandalous, foolish or inane happenings occur during the preceding 12 months, there's no problem picking out a set of highlights or inspiring moments to dwell on and go all dewy-eyed about.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | May 20, 1994
Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the disease that killed Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, is an increasingly common form of cancer that often responds to treatment but proves tragically persistent in many cases.It is a cancer of the lymph system, the network of nodes and vessels that plays a major role in protecting the body against infection.The cancer usually appears first as a painless swelling of lymph nodes clustered in the neck, armpit or groin, but it can also attack solid organs first.Early symptoms can also include anemia, weight loss and fever.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | March 29, 1994
Q: Our 25-year-old son had been perfectly well but went to our family doctor because of enlarged lymph glands in his neck. A diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease was made by examining one of the glands after its removal. We were shocked and understand that Hodgkin's disease is a form of cancer. We would like to know our son's chances of being cured.A: Hodgkin's disease belongs to a group of lymphatic tissue growths, or neoplasms, collectively called the malignant lymphomas. Specific findings during the microscopic examination of tissue distinguishes Hodgkin's disease from other types of lymphomas, termed non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, which are more common and generally more cancerous.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | December 23, 1993
Joseph W. Rutter Sr., a career Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. worker and father of the county planning director, died Tuesday of heart failure at his home in Ellicott City.Mr. Rutter, 83, who in retirement helped start the county's Meals on Wheels program, helped support his family from the age of 7, when he tied paper flowers for burials. He retired in 1974 from the underground engineering department at BG&E.Joseph W. Rutter Jr., the county planning and zoning director, said yesterday that it was that work ethic his father passed on to his sons.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | March 3, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- For a minute, it was just Mario Lemieux and the crowd.He stood along the boards before the national anthem was even sung last night, and tried to ignore the wave of noise that plunged from the Spectrum balcony to the ice.For years, Lemieux was the stranger in the toughest hockey town of all, but on this night, in this arena, all he heard were cheers, and finally, all he could do was look into the stands, wave his stick, and acknowledge the...
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1999
Every day, she felt exhausted, sick to her stomach -- and thrilled. After six years of trying to have another child and finally giving up hope, Andra Bowles discovered she was pregnant.But as the weeks passed last winter, she struggled to catch her breath. Soon, she couldn't even walk on her own.Doctors finally found the problem: Bowles, 39, had a malignant tumor larger than an apple in her chest. The diagnosis was Hodgkin's disease. Her unborn baby was, medically, a complication.As her physicians broke the news that Good Friday, Bowles' husband, Darrell, grabbed her hand and held it tight.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | March 3, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- For a minute, it was just Mario Lemieux and the crowd.He stood along the boards before the national anthem was even sung last night, and tried to ignore the wave of noise that plunged from the Spectrum balcony to the ice.For years, Lemieux was the stranger in the toughest hockey town of all, but on this night, in this arena, all he heard were cheers, and finally, all he could do was look into the stands, wave his stick, and acknowledge the...
SPORTS
By Bill Modoono and Bill Modoono,Contributing Writer | January 26, 1993
PITTSBURGH -- This was the day he was due back. The Pittsburgh Penguins were staring at a nasty stretch of four consecutive games against Patrick Division rivals and, conveniently enough, Mario Lemieux's back figured to be rested and ready for the test.But the NHL never has been known for convenience. More important, neither has Hodgkin's disease, which doctors diagnosed in Lemieux two weeks ago, while he was resting his ailing back.About two weeks have passed since the stunning news of Lemieux's illness was made public.
SPORTS
By Newsday | January 14, 1993
NEW YORK -- As Mario Lemieux begins intensive, exhaustive treatment that is bound to weaken even the greatest hockey player in the world, doctors and people who have overcome Hodgkin's disease assert he has a good chance to recover and rejoin the Pittsburgh Penguins -- a team that is used to a mix of hockey and reality.Lemieux, who was found to have the cancer this week and has started radiation treatment, spent an hour yesterday customarily leading the team he has helped carry to two straight Stanley Cup championships.
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