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By Megan Brockett, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2013
Janice O'Donnell watched the number on her screen climb and climb and climb. And when she couldn't watch any more, there were text messages from friends asking if she was watching. By the end of the day, close to $50,000 had poured in through the Chive Charities campaign set up to benefit her 2-year-old-daughter, Addyson, who was born with spina bifida. "I basically spent the entire day crying," O'Donnell said. She had expected maybe a couple thousand dollars, at the most.
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By Megan Brockett, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2013
Janice O'Donnell watched the number on her screen climb and climb and climb. And when she couldn't watch any more, there were text messages from friends asking if she was watching. By the end of the day, close to $50,000 had poured in through the Chive Charities campaign set up to benefit her 2-year-old-daughter, Addyson, who was born with spina bifida. "I basically spent the entire day crying," O'Donnell said. She had expected maybe a couple thousand dollars, at the most.
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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | March 29, 1994
Q: Our 25-year-old son had been perfectly well but went to our family doctor because of enlarged lymph glands in his neck. A diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease was made by examining one of the glands after its removal. We were shocked and understand that Hodgkin's disease is a form of cancer. We would like to know our son's chances of being cured.A: Hodgkin's disease belongs to a group of lymphatic tissue growths, or neoplasms, collectively called the malignant lymphomas. Specific findings during the microscopic examination of tissue distinguishes Hodgkin's disease from other types of lymphomas, termed non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, which are more common and generally more cancerous.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2011
Will Adams, freshman basketball player at Towson University, could be mad at the world about all the misfortune life dumped at his Philadelphia doorstep. There was the woman, his birth mother, who abandoned him to a series of foster homes at 3. There was the hit-and-run driver, racing through a yellow light, who dragged him and his bike a full city block, leaving Adams with compound fractures in both legs at 9. There was the cancer that ate away at his athlete's body for months before anyone knew, devouring his basketball dream when he was 18. It was as if he had a personal curse writing the storyline of his life.
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By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | November 21, 1990
Linda Tetrault is fighting to find out what made her son is sick.Alan,a senior at Northeast High in Pasadena,is among three students at the school to have contracted Hodgkin's disease within the past five years.Shuffling her papers Monday night in preparation to make her plea to board members for help,Tetrault asked that the school grounds be throughly checked.She was joined by about 20 other parents and teachers.All three students were llth-graders,playing at least two sports,when they were diagnosed.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | December 3, 1991
Q: My brother was recently told that he has Hodgkin's disease. I would appreciate more information on this disease and how it is treated.A: Hodgkin's disease is a type of lymphoma (malignant tumors of the lymphatic system) that includes lymph nodes and the spleen. Hodgkin's disease accounts for about one in 100 cancers in this country, and most commonly occurs in people between the ages of 15 and 35, or older than 50. Painless, progressive enlargement of lymph nodes in the neck is often the first manifestation of the disease.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 7, 1999
Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the cancer that struck King Hussein of Jordan, comes in many forms. While the prognosis varies significantly according to the type, any form can act unpredictably.Some such cancers wax and wane over years. Many people live for decades, hardly bothered by their lymphoma. Some may not need treatment for long periods.Many others, like the king, develop a form that is highly aggressive and succumb swiftly, even after they have an apparently successful bone marrow transplant and other powerful but risky therapies.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1996
This was more than just about the thrill of victory and, as often is the case with marathoning, the agony of da feet. This was about life -- Mark Conover's life.Conover, the surprise winner of the 1988 United States Olympic marathon trials, had just finished 10th in the 1992 trials. He might have felt bad about it if he hadn't been feeling so bad."I noticed that my health wasn't quite right, but at the time I didn't realize how sick I was," Conover, now 35, said recently.His condition misdiagnosed as asthma and other respiratory illnesses as far back as January of that year, Conover was found to have Hodgkin's disease in October 1993.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1999
Every day, she felt exhausted, sick to her stomach -- and thrilled. After six years of trying to have another child and finally giving up hope, Andra Bowles discovered she was pregnant.But as the weeks passed last winter, she struggled to catch her breath. Soon, she couldn't even walk on her own.Doctors finally found the problem: Bowles, 39, had a malignant tumor larger than an apple in her chest. The diagnosis was Hodgkin's disease. Her unborn baby was, medically, a complication.As her physicians broke the news that Good Friday, Bowles' husband, Darrell, grabbed her hand and held it tight.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2011
Will Adams, freshman basketball player at Towson University, could be mad at the world about all the misfortune life dumped at his Philadelphia doorstep. There was the woman, his birth mother, who abandoned him to a series of foster homes at 3. There was the hit-and-run driver, racing through a yellow light, who dragged him and his bike a full city block, leaving Adams with compound fractures in both legs at 9. There was the cancer that ate away at his athlete's body for months before anyone knew, devouring his basketball dream when he was 18. It was as if he had a personal curse writing the storyline of his life.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1999
Every day, she felt exhausted, sick to her stomach -- and thrilled. After six years of trying to have another child and finally giving up hope, Andra Bowles discovered she was pregnant.But as the weeks passed last winter, she struggled to catch her breath. Soon, she couldn't even walk on her own.Doctors finally found the problem: Bowles, 39, had a malignant tumor larger than an apple in her chest. The diagnosis was Hodgkin's disease. Her unborn baby was, medically, a complication.As her physicians broke the news that Good Friday, Bowles' husband, Darrell, grabbed her hand and held it tight.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 7, 1999
Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the cancer that struck King Hussein of Jordan, comes in many forms. While the prognosis varies significantly according to the type, any form can act unpredictably.Some such cancers wax and wane over years. Many people live for decades, hardly bothered by their lymphoma. Some may not need treatment for long periods.Many others, like the king, develop a form that is highly aggressive and succumb swiftly, even after they have an apparently successful bone marrow transplant and other powerful but risky therapies.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1996
This was more than just about the thrill of victory and, as often is the case with marathoning, the agony of da feet. This was about life -- Mark Conover's life.Conover, the surprise winner of the 1988 United States Olympic marathon trials, had just finished 10th in the 1992 trials. He might have felt bad about it if he hadn't been feeling so bad."I noticed that my health wasn't quite right, but at the time I didn't realize how sick I was," Conover, now 35, said recently.His condition misdiagnosed as asthma and other respiratory illnesses as far back as January of that year, Conover was found to have Hodgkin's disease in October 1993.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | March 29, 1994
Q: Our 25-year-old son had been perfectly well but went to our family doctor because of enlarged lymph glands in his neck. A diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease was made by examining one of the glands after its removal. We were shocked and understand that Hodgkin's disease is a form of cancer. We would like to know our son's chances of being cured.A: Hodgkin's disease belongs to a group of lymphatic tissue growths, or neoplasms, collectively called the malignant lymphomas. Specific findings during the microscopic examination of tissue distinguishes Hodgkin's disease from other types of lymphomas, termed non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, which are more common and generally more cancerous.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | December 3, 1991
Q: My brother was recently told that he has Hodgkin's disease. I would appreciate more information on this disease and how it is treated.A: Hodgkin's disease is a type of lymphoma (malignant tumors of the lymphatic system) that includes lymph nodes and the spleen. Hodgkin's disease accounts for about one in 100 cancers in this country, and most commonly occurs in people between the ages of 15 and 35, or older than 50. Painless, progressive enlargement of lymph nodes in the neck is often the first manifestation of the disease.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | November 21, 1990
Linda Tetrault is fighting to find out what made her son is sick.Alan,a senior at Northeast High in Pasadena,is among three students at the school to have contracted Hodgkin's disease within the past five years.Shuffling her papers Monday night in preparation to make her plea to board members for help,Tetrault asked that the school grounds be throughly checked.She was joined by about 20 other parents and teachers.All three students were llth-graders,playing at least two sports,when they were diagnosed.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1999
It was a celebrity wedding. Brady Anderson was there, and Chris Evert and Billie Jean King, along with Hollywood directors and producers. But behind the big names and glitter was a story of love and loss, second chances and taking chances.In a ceremony held at La Quinta resort in Palm Springs, Baltimore's own Pam Shriver -- a former professional tennis player once ranked as high as No. 3 in the world -- married Los Angeles law professor Joseph Shapiro.Wearing a hand-beaded and embroidered silk sheath with a sweep train, the bride recited her vows in a simple 20-minute ceremony presided over by Jane Mykrantz, a Presbyterian minister and an old family friend.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | June 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- When archaeologists excavated 18 graves at a 3-century-old Calvert County plantation a few years ago, they had no headstones, no diaries, no letters and no church records. Nothing to tell the stories of those long-vanished colonists.Now Douglas H. Ubelaker, an anthropologist at the Smithsonian Institution, has made the bones talk.By studying wear and tear and the shapes and sizes of the bones, Dr. Ubelaker has produced grim snapshots of life on a mid-17th century Maryland settlement: of shoulders strained by heavy lifting and hauling, of clay pipes puffed habitually through clenched teeth, of bones made brittle by disease, of malnutrition and early death.
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