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NEWS
By Ed McDonough and Ed McDonough,Staff writer | November 13, 1991
Carroll County dominated the early years of the state field hockey tournament.In the first 11 years of the event, which started in 1976, Carroll teams won 12 titles, including at least one each year except 1979.But over the last four years, the county had faltered a bit. Since 1987, the best Carroll could do was a Class 1A co-championship withFrancis Scott Key in 1989.Oh, plenty of county teams had made the tournament since then, but none had won. Last year, three Carroll teams qualified, but all three bowed out in the semifinals.
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SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 31, 1992
Before yesterday, area NHL fans might have been singing a sad tune about the lack of games on local television. In fact, it could have gone like this (with apologies to The Who's "Baba O'Riley"):Out here on the dial,you could search for a while,and never find a little hockey.It may not have been right,and not seemed too bright.As a matter of fact, it was downright schlocky.Hockey wasteland, it's only hockey wasteland.Those days are over, though. Home Team Sports yesterday reached an agreement with SportsChannel America to carry SCA's NHL package.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | January 20, 1995
Now that the NHL has stumbled back from the abyss of a crippling 104-day lockout, just what will fans see and will they care? In the long term, the second question is infinitely more important than the first, and nobody has a definitive answer, including ESPN hockey analysts Mike Milbury and Bill Clement."
SPORTS
By Phil jackman | February 21, 1992
Don't things seem slightly out of whack when a guy skates around in a tight circle against three other guys for about a minute and a half and comes away with the same medal an entire hockey team, busting its gut for two weeks, does?Speaking of short-track speed skating, its inclusion as a medal sport along with freestyle skiing moguls has added three medals to the U.S. count. Yes indeed, George Steinbrenner and his commission, named at the 1988 Games in Calgary, have done yeoman work improving our team.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 28, 2000
BURLINGTON, Vt. -- They skated with abandon, these University of Vermont hockey players. After a disappointing record last year, they took to the ice this season with the hope that their teamwork would lead to a string of victories and a bid for the playoffs. But soon after the Catamounts played their first league games, the X-rated details of a preseason hockey team party embroiled the university in a hazing scandal. University athletic officials were accused of not doing enough to try and stop the Big Night party, despite a warning that rookie team members would be ordered to consume excessive amounts of alcohol.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2004
The sounds of family life rattled in the background as Washington Capitals defenseman Jason Doig talked about what he is doing during the National Hockey League's lockout, which has discontinued the game for the foreseeable future. "We're about to have lunch," Doig said during a phone conversation last week, as his wife, Faye, set the table and their children, Jaggar, 11 months, and Kyla, 3 1/2 years, clamored. He and his family are living in an apartment in Baltimore while he is in rehab at the Maryland Sports Care and Rehab Clinic in Westminster for a wrist injury he suffered near the end of last season.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2001
Hockey has changed? A more refined sport? A less physical sport? When the Pittsburgh Penguins' Mario Lemieux returned to the NHL ice last month for the first time in 3 1/2 years, that's what he perceived. And others echoed his words. Less clutch and grab, they said. More room for him to skate. The perfect palette for Lemieux's magic skates. So, what's this going on in Pittsburgh? General manager Craig Patrick spent last week assembling players who could work overtime in the WWF. Steve McKenna, 6 feet 8, 255 pounds; Kevin Stevens, 6-5, 235; and Krzysztof Oliwa, 6-3, 230, from Minnesota, Philadelphia and Columbus, respectively.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | February 9, 1993
In one corner was Al Iafrate, hockey player, fourth-fastest skater in the NHL, 6 feet 3, 220 pounds, goes by the nickname of "Wild Thing," shoulder-length brown hair with a bald spot larger than the Montreal Forum, rides a Harley and relaxes after games by lighting up a cigarette with a blowtorch.In the other corner was Cathy Turner, short-track speed skater, 1992 Winter Olympic gold medalist, 5 feet 3, 130 pounds, a former lounge singer who wrote the song "Sexy, Kinky Tomboy," blond hair shaved on the sides, favorite mode of transportation unknown, doesn't smoke.
SPORTS
By Helene Elliott and Helene Elliott,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 2003
Roger Neilson, whose eccentric manner and spectacularly ugly neckties masked one of the sharpest minds in hockey, died yesterday at his home in the Ontario, Canada, community of Peterborough. He turned 69 last Monday. Neilson had suffered from multiple myeloma - cancer of the bone marrow - and skin cancer. The disease reportedly had spread to his brain. Although he never advanced beyond junior hockey as a player, Neilson coached eight NHL teams. A coach, assistant coach, scout or video coordinator for NHL teams every year since 1977, he was an assistant with the Ottawa Senators last season.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2005
The National Hockey League and its players association reached a six-year collective bargaining agreement yesterday, ending a 10-month lockout that cost the league a season and, many say, the interest of sports fans nationwide. The league did not immediately release details of the deal, which still must be ratified by both sides. But wire reports said the agreement will include many changes the league and its owners sought, including a hard salary cap and revenue sharing. The deal also includes an unprecedented 24 percent rollback on existing contracts.
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