Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHochschild
IN THE NEWS

Hochschild

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | June 20, 2008
Marion G. Rupertus, a retired department store manager and former longtime Catonsville resident, died Wednesday of a stroke at St. Agnes Hospital. She was 84. Marion Grace Slosson was born in New Rochelle, N.Y., and raised in Clarks Summit, Pa., where she graduated from Clarks Summit High School in 1941. After graduating from high school, she moved to Baltimore and worked at Bendix Radio Corp. on East Joppa Road in Towson during World War II. . "While working at the company, she was named Miss Bendix in 1943," said her daughter, Maureen Joy Rupertus of Baltimore.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
An Owings Mills-based real estate investment group announced plans Tuesday to convert a former Hochschild, Kohn & Co. department store warehouse and showroom in Mount Vernon into apartments. "The building will offer 171 residences comprised of 146 studio and one-bedroom units and 25 two-bedroom units," said a statement from the Time Group. Apartment sizes will vary from 470 square foot studios to 950 square foot two-bedroom units   -  all will have 13 foot ceilings, the firm said.
Advertisement
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | January 21, 2006
There it sat, the polished former Hochschild Kohn terrazzo floor I recalled from my youth. The restored floor, holding the tables and racks of the Daedalus Books & Music due to open this morning, is a component of this building's underrated sleek modern design. We've overlooked this Govans landmark's finer points for too long. As I walked in the other night, through the big glass door at York and Belvedere, I thought that for all the talk about midcentury design, this is a splendid version - a progressive, unencumbered modern design, with steel, glass and curving atrium walls.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Let's go shopping! Michael J. Lisicky, a Baltimore Symphony Orchestra oboist and noted chronicler of departed East Coast department stores, had a local hit three years ago with his book, "Hutzler's: Where Baltimore Shops. " Now he is taking us on another nostalgic shopping tour to several of the city's sorely missed stores with the recent publication of his "Baltimore's Bygone Department Stores: Many Happy Returns. " He takes us back to that now-vanished and magical world of perfumed department stores with their tinkling, chiming, paging bells, and elegantly dressed and convivial floorwalkers and sales associates who were willing to help customers find what they were looking for. Lisicky generates memories here of goods beautifully displayed, the slight whooshing sound that the pneumatic tube made as it whisked a charge to the business office for approval and of stores gaily decorated not only for holidays but for various seasons.
NEWS
February 2, 1991
Carla Hochschild Berney, a former resident of Baltimore, died Thursday of complications to cancer at a hospital in Colorado Springs, Colo.Mrs. Berneylived in Baltimore from 1944 until 1969 and served during the late 1960s as executive director of Maryland Partner of the Alliance.A native of Colmar in Alsace-Lorraine who was reared in Frankfurt, Germany, the former Carla Hochschild came to this country and settled in Philadelphia. In 1944, after her marriage to Albert Berney, she came to Baltimore, where a great-uncle was a founder of the department store that came to be known by her family name.
NEWS
By Susan Jacoby and Susan Jacoby,Newsday | April 10, 1994
Adam Hochschild arrived in Moscow during the winter of 1991 -- the last year of the old Soviet order -- hoping to learn how Russians were coming to terms with the memory of the great repression of Stalinism. The result of his inquiry is an account of what the author calls "seeing and denial" -- how millions of people carried on with their lives under a regime that, at the height of its terror in the 1930s, managed to arrest or kill one out of every eight Soviet citizens.In spite of all that has been written about Stalinism, this is an astonishing statistic that illuminates the extent of fear and denial in Soviet life.
NEWS
By FRANKLIN MASON | December 21, 1991
He went Downtown the other way.He said it with the capital D because that was what it was to him, or once was. He went to the very heart, the center of Downtown, to Howard and Lexington Streets.He hadn't realized it until he was there, standing on the corner. He hadn't realized what it meant to him. It had to do with childhood, with youth.He remembered the day after Thanksgiving a half-century and more ago. It was the Downtown day for children, the day of no school, of Santa in stores, and the toys shining.
NEWS
January 26, 1992
Martin B. Kohn,Hochschild, Kohn president, diesMartin B. Kohn, who as president and chairman of Hochschild, Kohn & Co. pioneered building suburban branches for Baltimore's downtown department stores, died at his home yesterday of a cerebral hemorrhage.Funeral services for Mr. Kohn, who was 93, will be held at 2 p.m. tomorrow at Sol Levinson & Bros. funeral home, 6010 Reisterstown Road.Born in Baltimore Aug. 28, 1898, Mr. Kohn was the son of Clara and Benno Kohn, one of the founders of Hochschild, Kohn.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | March 30, 1997
MAYBE IT was the poplin suit I got for Easter 1965 that makes me associate this time of the year with below-ground shopping. The basements of Baltimore's vanished downtown department stores housed what were politely called budget stores, featuring overloaded tables, stuffed racks, cut-rate prices and singing cash registers.Occasionally some copy writer would get carried away, as one did in an ad for the long-gone Bernheimer-Leader budget basement: "Below the street, but above the level."Nobody was fooled.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | November 19, 1995
When I was growing up, Thanksgiving dinner came with so much anticipation, we raced through the actual meal. Uncle Jack usually got tired of waiting and started eating before the official start signal was given, usually when the oldest member of the house sat down on one of great-grandfather's always unsteady dining room chairs. Platters and cut-glass bowls were sent around the table faster than the Preakness winner could make it to the finish line.A telephone call or doorbell often disrupted the proceedings.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | August 10, 2009
Peter Kohn, a retired college athletic team field manager inducted into the Lacrosse Hall of Fame, died Wednesday at the University of Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia. He had suffered a heart attack while on a fishing trip near Cape May, N.J. The North Baltimore resident was 77. "He was an inspirational figure," said former Middlebury College lacrosse coach Jim Grube. "Pete thrived in the environment of coaches and athletes." Born Myron Gutman "Peter" Kohn in Baltimore, he was the son of Bernard Kohn, whose family owned the old Hochschild Kohn department store.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | June 20, 2008
Marion G. Rupertus, a retired department store manager and former longtime Catonsville resident, died Wednesday of a stroke at St. Agnes Hospital. She was 84. Marion Grace Slosson was born in New Rochelle, N.Y., and raised in Clarks Summit, Pa., where she graduated from Clarks Summit High School in 1941. After graduating from high school, she moved to Baltimore and worked at Bendix Radio Corp. on East Joppa Road in Towson during World War II. . "While working at the company, she was named Miss Bendix in 1943," said her daughter, Maureen Joy Rupertus of Baltimore.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | October 20, 2007
I can see the vinyl disc spinning on the turntable at the old Hochschild Kohn music department. The song was "Chanson d'Amour" as sung by Dotty Todd and her husband, Art, the man whose obituary ran this week (he was 93). His musical career began on Kentucky Avenue in Northeast Baltimore, and he credited his mother - and her piano training - for sending him on to a career in music. Like so many, I also grew up with a piano, in our case an upright Charles M.
NEWS
February 16, 2007
On the day Walter Sondheim Jr. was born - a rainy summer Saturday - Hochschild, Kohn & Co. was holding a half-day sale, with tan Milanese silk gloves (12-button length) marked down from $1.25 to 79 cents. The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad laid off 2,500 workers at its Mount Clare shops. The Sun editorial page complained that the motto of city agencies seemed to be, "Never do today that which can be delayed until tomorrow," yet it also urged the suburbs of Highlandtown and Canton to agree to annexation by Baltimore in order to enjoy the benefits of the city's cheap water and good schools.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | January 21, 2006
There it sat, the polished former Hochschild Kohn terrazzo floor I recalled from my youth. The restored floor, holding the tables and racks of the Daedalus Books & Music due to open this morning, is a component of this building's underrated sleek modern design. We've overlooked this Govans landmark's finer points for too long. As I walked in the other night, through the big glass door at York and Belvedere, I thought that for all the talk about midcentury design, this is a splendid version - a progressive, unencumbered modern design, with steel, glass and curving atrium walls.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | March 30, 1997
MAYBE IT was the poplin suit I got for Easter 1965 that makes me associate this time of the year with below-ground shopping. The basements of Baltimore's vanished downtown department stores housed what were politely called budget stores, featuring overloaded tables, stuffed racks, cut-rate prices and singing cash registers.Occasionally some copy writer would get carried away, as one did in an ad for the long-gone Bernheimer-Leader budget basement: "Below the street, but above the level."Nobody was fooled.
NEWS
February 16, 2007
On the day Walter Sondheim Jr. was born - a rainy summer Saturday - Hochschild, Kohn & Co. was holding a half-day sale, with tan Milanese silk gloves (12-button length) marked down from $1.25 to 79 cents. The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad laid off 2,500 workers at its Mount Clare shops. The Sun editorial page complained that the motto of city agencies seemed to be, "Never do today that which can be delayed until tomorrow," yet it also urged the suburbs of Highlandtown and Canton to agree to annexation by Baltimore in order to enjoy the benefits of the city's cheap water and good schools.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
An Owings Mills-based real estate investment group announced plans Tuesday to convert a former Hochschild, Kohn & Co. department store warehouse and showroom in Mount Vernon into apartments. "The building will offer 171 residences comprised of 146 studio and one-bedroom units and 25 two-bedroom units," said a statement from the Time Group. Apartment sizes will vary from 470 square foot studios to 950 square foot two-bedroom units   -  all will have 13 foot ceilings, the firm said.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | November 19, 1995
When I was growing up, Thanksgiving dinner came with so much anticipation, we raced through the actual meal. Uncle Jack usually got tired of waiting and started eating before the official start signal was given, usually when the oldest member of the house sat down on one of great-grandfather's always unsteady dining room chairs. Platters and cut-glass bowls were sent around the table faster than the Preakness winner could make it to the finish line.A telephone call or doorbell often disrupted the proceedings.
NEWS
By Susan Jacoby and Susan Jacoby,Newsday | April 10, 1994
Adam Hochschild arrived in Moscow during the winter of 1991 -- the last year of the old Soviet order -- hoping to learn how Russians were coming to terms with the memory of the great repression of Stalinism. The result of his inquiry is an account of what the author calls "seeing and denial" -- how millions of people carried on with their lives under a regime that, at the height of its terror in the 1930s, managed to arrest or kill one out of every eight Soviet citizens.In spite of all that has been written about Stalinism, this is an astonishing statistic that illuminates the extent of fear and denial in Soviet life.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.