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By RICHARD O'MARA | December 3, 1993
It must spring from the natural human impulse to remember and, aware of the evanescence of memory, to concretize, to have something to look at or touch that evokes that which is gone.Why else would the citizens of Hoboken in New Jersey wish to establish a Frank Sinatra Museum? Are they afraid we might all forget him when the great voice is finally stilled? Do they think we need a shrine to mitigate the pain of Ol' Blue Eyes' departure from the land of the living?Maybe Hoboken just needs the money they think Sinatra pilgrims might bring with them.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2011
I repeated a blooper in my recent column on the 100th anniversary of Baltimore's Pennsylvania Station that was caught by a sharp-eyed Roland Park resident and lawyer, John C. Murphy, who comes from a family of Baltimore architects. I had stated with the authority of numerous articles (some that appeared in this newspaper) that Kenneth Murchison, who had designed Baltimore's Pennsylvania Station, had been a member of the esteemed New York City architectural firm of McKim, Mead and White.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 2004
HOBOKEN, N.J. -- There was a time when this nearly 150-year-old city on the Hudson was chiefly known for its proximity to Manhattan or as the birthplace of Frank Sinatra. Today, Hoboken has come into its own. Thanks to a revitalization in the late '70s and early '80s, this one-time working-class, industrial hub of immigrants has morphed into a community that's hip, cultural and decidedly gentrified. Waterfront development projects are creating excitement. Companies like Chase Manhattan Bank helped usher in some 4,000 new jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2005
Robert and Linda Dusel, of Towson, MD, are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter, Jennifer Lynn, to Christopher Sam Eig, son of Keith Eig and Mary Hayden, of Potomac, MD. The couple was wed on Saturday, June 4, 2005 at the Cloisters in Brooklandville, MD. Sunny Schnitzer, of Bethesda Jewish Congregation, officiated. Honor attendants were Katie Horn, Christianne White, Rebecca Eig, Brian Eig, Jeremy Feinberg and Brendon Dusel. After a honeymoon in Florida, the couple resides in Hoboken, NJ with their son, Ethan.
NEWS
By Hugh R. Morley and Hugh R. Morley,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 9, 2002
NEW YORK - A shortfall in riders between Hoboken and Manhattan has left the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey paying $1.14 million a month in federal disaster funds to NY Waterway for a ferry service that operates at less than half capacity. Since March, the Weehawken company has been paid $551 per boat per hour to provide enough vessels, captains, deckhands, and other personnel to carry the 60,000 riders a day who used the PATH train routes that were destroyed when the World Trade Center collapsed, Port Authority and company officials said.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1998
HOBOKEN, N.J. - The lyrical loves of his life, Chicago, New York, L.A., can't claim him anymore. Having once lost its native son and "Brightest Star," Hoboken this past weekend brought Francis Albert Sinatra home for good.The town was swinging while in mourning. Just follow the music to the story of how the Mile Square City reclaimed Frank Sinatra - block by block, tune by tune, drink by drink:The stone-cold-serious cab driver at Newark's Penn Station sings along with his lousy radio, as Frank and daughter Nancy croon "Somethin' Stupid."
NEWS
December 31, 1998
Because of erroneous information supplied by the Associate Press, a news brief in Monday's editions misidentified the owner of a bus that crashed Sunday on a New Jersey Turnpike ramp. The owner is Academy Bus Tours Inc. of Hoboken, N.J., not Academy Bus Co.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 12/31/98
SPORTS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 16, 2000
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -- Penn State football coach Joe Paterno wasn't talking yesterday about Rashard Casey's arrest over the weekend for allegedly assaulting an off-duty police officer, but plenty of others were. Casey, who was arrested along with another man early Sunday morning outside a nightclub in his hometown of Hoboken, N.J., pleaded not guilty to one charge of aggravated assault yesterday afternoon at his arraignment in Jersey City, N.J. "He's not guilty," said Dennis McAlevy of Mount Union, N.J., the attorney representing Casey.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2005
Robert and Linda Dusel, of Towson, MD, are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter, Jennifer Lynn, to Christopher Sam Eig, son of Keith Eig and Mary Hayden, of Potomac, MD. The couple was wed on Saturday, June 4, 2005 at the Cloisters in Brooklandville, MD. Sunny Schnitzer, of Bethesda Jewish Congregation, officiated. Honor attendants were Katie Horn, Christianne White, Rebecca Eig, Brian Eig, Jeremy Feinberg and Brendon Dusel. After a honeymoon in Florida, the couple resides in Hoboken, NJ with their son, Ethan.
NEWS
May 16, 1998
HE WAS the Depression-era dropout son of Italian immigrants in crummy Hoboken. The boy crooner for Harry James' band whose hits ended the 1930s on an upbeat. The skinny young man whose punctured eardrum kept him out of the army when millions served, only to have bobby soxers jumping and swooning in the aisles.He personified the 1940s, the 1950, the 1960s. Long after he should have gone out, "I did it my way," became everyone's anthem. And then he flourished through a quarter century of farewell appearances, each better received than the last.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 2004
HOBOKEN, N.J. -- There was a time when this nearly 150-year-old city on the Hudson was chiefly known for its proximity to Manhattan or as the birthplace of Frank Sinatra. Today, Hoboken has come into its own. Thanks to a revitalization in the late '70s and early '80s, this one-time working-class, industrial hub of immigrants has morphed into a community that's hip, cultural and decidedly gentrified. Waterfront development projects are creating excitement. Companies like Chase Manhattan Bank helped usher in some 4,000 new jobs.
NEWS
By Hugh R. Morley and Hugh R. Morley,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 9, 2002
NEW YORK - A shortfall in riders between Hoboken and Manhattan has left the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey paying $1.14 million a month in federal disaster funds to NY Waterway for a ferry service that operates at less than half capacity. Since March, the Weehawken company has been paid $551 per boat per hour to provide enough vessels, captains, deckhands, and other personnel to carry the 60,000 riders a day who used the PATH train routes that were destroyed when the World Trade Center collapsed, Port Authority and company officials said.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 2001
I saw my first "Nunsense" at Chesapeake Music Hall in January last year, and a repeat in November, as part of the Performing Arts Association of Linthicum's subscription series. Now, with the music hall's "Nunsense II, The Second Coming," these nuns have become a habit with me. Master punster, playwright, composer-lyricist Dan Goggin introduced "Nunsense" in 1985. Its success - playing almost constantly in New York and on the road - persuaded him to write the sequel, first produced in 1993.
SPORTS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 16, 2000
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -- Penn State football coach Joe Paterno wasn't talking yesterday about Rashard Casey's arrest over the weekend for allegedly assaulting an off-duty police officer, but plenty of others were. Casey, who was arrested along with another man early Sunday morning outside a nightclub in his hometown of Hoboken, N.J., pleaded not guilty to one charge of aggravated assault yesterday afternoon at his arraignment in Jersey City, N.J. "He's not guilty," said Dennis McAlevy of Mount Union, N.J., the attorney representing Casey.
NEWS
By Charles V. Bagli and Charles V. Bagli,New York Times News Service | September 16, 1999
JERSEY CITY, N.J. -- Of all the real estate debacles and broken dreams of the recession a decade ago, few were more spectacular than the collapse of Port Liberte. Starry-eyed developers envisioned it as a kind of Venice-on-the-Hudson, with a network of canals dredged out of a dilapidated waterfront and high-priced European-style townhouses offering views of the Statue of Liberty and the Manhattan skyline.But only a tiny portion of the $750 million project -- a few apartments and only one canal -- was ever built here, and Port Liberte earned its spot in history as the largest real estate bankruptcy east of the Mississippi.
NEWS
December 31, 1998
Because of erroneous information supplied by the Associate Press, a news brief in Monday's editions misidentified the owner of a bus that crashed Sunday on a New Jersey Turnpike ramp. The owner is Academy Bus Tours Inc. of Hoboken, N.J., not Academy Bus Co.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 12/31/98
FEATURES
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 1997
HOBOKEN, N.J. -- Al D'Amato swears he didn't mean any offense, that the simple bill he introduced earlier this year in Washington was not intended as yet another salvo across the Hudson at neighboring New Jersey.Sen. D'Amato's bill, passed unanimously by the Senate, merely authorized the production of a Congressional Gold Medal honoring Frank Sinatra. But wittingly or not, the chairman of the Senate Banking Committee added a comment that New Jerseyans saw as a twist of the knife: "Frank Sinatra is a New Yorker in spirit and soul."
NEWS
By Charles V. Bagli and Charles V. Bagli,New York Times News Service | September 16, 1999
JERSEY CITY, N.J. -- Of all the real estate debacles and broken dreams of the recession a decade ago, few were more spectacular than the collapse of Port Liberte. Starry-eyed developers envisioned it as a kind of Venice-on-the-Hudson, with a network of canals dredged out of a dilapidated waterfront and high-priced European-style townhouses offering views of the Statue of Liberty and the Manhattan skyline.But only a tiny portion of the $750 million project -- a few apartments and only one canal -- was ever built here, and Port Liberte earned its spot in history as the largest real estate bankruptcy east of the Mississippi.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1998
HOBOKEN, N.J. - The lyrical loves of his life, Chicago, New York, L.A., can't claim him anymore. Having once lost its native son and "Brightest Star," Hoboken this past weekend brought Francis Albert Sinatra home for good.The town was swinging while in mourning. Just follow the music to the story of how the Mile Square City reclaimed Frank Sinatra - block by block, tune by tune, drink by drink:The stone-cold-serious cab driver at Newark's Penn Station sings along with his lousy radio, as Frank and daughter Nancy croon "Somethin' Stupid."
NEWS
May 16, 1998
HE WAS the Depression-era dropout son of Italian immigrants in crummy Hoboken. The boy crooner for Harry James' band whose hits ended the 1930s on an upbeat. The skinny young man whose punctured eardrum kept him out of the army when millions served, only to have bobby soxers jumping and swooning in the aisles.He personified the 1940s, the 1950, the 1960s. Long after he should have gone out, "I did it my way," became everyone's anthem. And then he flourished through a quarter century of farewell appearances, each better received than the last.
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