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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 13, 1993
BRAINERD, Minn. -- When the "Sacramento Kid" decided to hop a freight train to the hobo convention here in early May, he donned his overalls and red T-shirt and lit out for the airport.The airport? Well, there was just no way the 29-year-old computer chip engineer had the time to travel the full distance by boxcar from his California home.A quick flight to Minneapolis, a warm car ride to the rail yards and there was the Kid --ing alongside a monstrous black train, reaching for a steel ladder above his head.
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FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| December 12, 2013
The UPS driver looked a little befuddled when he walked into Howl on Chestnut Ave., in Baltimore yesterday afternoon. “There's a cat out here in a carrier,” he told Robin McDonald, owner of the natural pet-supply store. She followed him outside and lo and behold, there sat what appeared to be a Maine Coon mix in a carrier with a note: “Very nice cat. Please help! Jean-Pierre is his name.” He looked skinny and scruffy and his hair was sparse, but McDonald brought Jean-Pierre into the shop and opened the carrier door.
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NEWS
By Walter F. Naedale and Walter F. Naedale,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 26, 2000
PENNSBURG, Pa. -- Betty Moylan, 58, sat on the steps of her motor home the other day and recalled how, while working at the national headquarters of an insurance firm in Connecticut, she became a hobo. "I took my first freight-train ride. From Dunsmuir, California, to Roseville, California, roughly 350 miles," she said, recalling a vacation in 1993. She went back to work as senior administrator for accounting operations at the insurance firm. Quit in 1995. Sold her home. Her sister in upstate New York sold hers, too. Together, they bought the motor home.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO | December 2, 2007
Lilac Bijoux 511 E. Belvedere Square 410-323-4333 or lilacbijoux.com Open 10 a.m.-6 Monday-Saturday; noon-5 Sunday Lilac Bijoux, an Annapolis jewelery and accessories shop, has opened a second location at Belvedere Square in North Baltimore. Co-owners Fern Elliott and Beth Ingham share a playful eye and an appreciation for reasonably priced baubles with a fine touch. Earrings and other small pieces start in the $20 range. "We try not to have anything more than $300," Elliott says. Matte sterling silver pieces by Kelim, a Switzerland design firm, are formed with interlocking petals and other organic shapes.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| December 12, 2013
The UPS driver looked a little befuddled when he walked into Howl on Chestnut Ave., in Baltimore yesterday afternoon. “There's a cat out here in a carrier,” he told Robin McDonald, owner of the natural pet-supply store. She followed him outside and lo and behold, there sat what appeared to be a Maine Coon mix in a carrier with a note: “Very nice cat. Please help! Jean-Pierre is his name.” He looked skinny and scruffy and his hair was sparse, but McDonald brought Jean-Pierre into the shop and opened the carrier door.
FEATURES
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2001
When a bloodied Hasim "Rock" Rahman threw the big right hand that won him the heavyweight title Saturday, he did it in style, wearing black velvet HOBOs with red satin trim. Just like 20-1 underdog Rahman, HOBO, the Washington-based urban fashion line that opened a boutique in Baltimore a year ago, was largely obscure before last weekend. But both were suddenly famous in the fifth round, when Rahman knocked out defending champ Lennox Lewis while wearing trunks with the rhinestone logo - which stands for Helping Our Brothas Out. Since then, photos of Baltimore's overnight boxing sensation and the label he endorses have been splashed across the world.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1999
If you spend weekends with Jonny O the BBQ Hobo, you learn things about barbecue.You learn that if you want to eat a 97-pound pig for Sunday supper you start cooking it by Saturday noon. You learn that a good way to get hickory wood, one of the required fuels of authentic barbecue, is to have a friend in the excavating business. He'll keep you in hickory stumps if you cook a few pigs for him.You learn that when you're eating authentic barbecued chicken, you do not get alarmed if the meat is red. It's a sign that the chicken has been smoked, not that it's under-cooked.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | December 15, 1994
An undercover police detective posing as a hobo sold $2.60 worth of scrap metal to the United Iron and Metal Co., and now the Baltimore-based company is charged with 10 criminal violations that could bring up to $26,000 in fines.The charges, filed Tuesday, allege that United Iron has been violating a city public ordinance requiring buyers of scrap metal to file records of their transactions with the city Police Department.Detectives began the investigation after the recent arrest of a homeless man who said he stole brass placards off downtown buildings and sold them to a scrap metal dealer, said police Sgt. Michael Tabor.
NEWS
December 3, 2006
EMMETT KELLY JR., 83 Followed father into clowning Emmett Kelly Jr., son of one of the nation's most famous hobo clowns who followed his father into a career under the big top, died of complications from pneumonia Wednesday at a hospital near his home in Tombstone, Ariz. In 1960, with the makeup and blessing of his father, he made his clown debut at the Circus Festival in Peru, Ind. Four years later, Eastman Kodak signed him to appear at the New York World's Fair. He also went on to entertain at more than 2,800 hospitals.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO | December 2, 2007
Lilac Bijoux 511 E. Belvedere Square 410-323-4333 or lilacbijoux.com Open 10 a.m.-6 Monday-Saturday; noon-5 Sunday Lilac Bijoux, an Annapolis jewelery and accessories shop, has opened a second location at Belvedere Square in North Baltimore. Co-owners Fern Elliott and Beth Ingham share a playful eye and an appreciation for reasonably priced baubles with a fine touch. Earrings and other small pieces start in the $20 range. "We try not to have anything more than $300," Elliott says. Matte sterling silver pieces by Kelim, a Switzerland design firm, are formed with interlocking petals and other organic shapes.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,Sun Reporter | May 18, 2007
Maybe the reason I'm so interested in the past of my dog is because of the dogs of my past. The first was a collie named Tippy (named for the white tip of his tail). He was a present for my fifth birthday on Long Island, N.Y. Lassie was in its fourth season that year, 1958. Tippy, while he never rescued any children from wells or anything like that, was a wonderful dog. He died prematurely and mysteriously, by poisoning, a few years later. Accompanying me through puberty was Schatzi (German for "sweetheart")
NEWS
December 3, 2006
EMMETT KELLY JR., 83 Followed father into clowning Emmett Kelly Jr., son of one of the nation's most famous hobo clowns who followed his father into a career under the big top, died of complications from pneumonia Wednesday at a hospital near his home in Tombstone, Ariz. In 1960, with the makeup and blessing of his father, he made his clown debut at the Circus Festival in Peru, Ind. Four years later, Eastman Kodak signed him to appear at the New York World's Fair. He also went on to entertain at more than 2,800 hospitals.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 15, 2004
The events that led to David Burnside's arrest started when two plainclothes city police officers saw a man running in West Baltimore - while wearing a ski cap and a hobo Halloween mask. The officers were in the first block of S. Stockton St. yesterday when they saw the masked man and chased him to 11 S. Carey St., where he was caught as he stuffed the ski cap and hobo mask into his pocket, police said. Police said they also recovered suspected cocaine and a .38 Special revolver from the man. Nagi Abdo, the owner of a convenience store in the 1200 block of W. Baltimore St., identified the suspect as the man who had robbed him and his wife at gunpoint.
FEATURES
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2001
When a bloodied Hasim "Rock" Rahman threw the big right hand that won him the heavyweight title Saturday, he did it in style, wearing black velvet HOBOs with red satin trim. Just like 20-1 underdog Rahman, HOBO, the Washington-based urban fashion line that opened a boutique in Baltimore a year ago, was largely obscure before last weekend. But both were suddenly famous in the fifth round, when Rahman knocked out defending champ Lennox Lewis while wearing trunks with the rhinestone logo - which stands for Helping Our Brothas Out. Since then, photos of Baltimore's overnight boxing sensation and the label he endorses have been splashed across the world.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2001
Hasim "Rock" Rahman came home from South Africa yesterday with the world heavyweight boxing title and this advice for aspiring athletes: "If you want to win a championship, you got to move to Baltimore!" Mayor Martin O'Malley, posing with his fist at Rahman's jaw, beamed: "The city of champions!" Rahman, who had three small bandages above his left eye, was met at a downtown clothing store by throngs of adoring fans who demanded hugs and autographs and snapshots with the heavyweight champion.
NEWS
By Walter F. Naedale and Walter F. Naedale,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 26, 2000
PENNSBURG, Pa. -- Betty Moylan, 58, sat on the steps of her motor home the other day and recalled how, while working at the national headquarters of an insurance firm in Connecticut, she became a hobo. "I took my first freight-train ride. From Dunsmuir, California, to Roseville, California, roughly 350 miles," she said, recalling a vacation in 1993. She went back to work as senior administrator for accounting operations at the insurance firm. Quit in 1995. Sold her home. Her sister in upstate New York sold hers, too. Together, they bought the motor home.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 15, 2004
The events that led to David Burnside's arrest started when two plainclothes city police officers saw a man running in West Baltimore - while wearing a ski cap and a hobo Halloween mask. The officers were in the first block of S. Stockton St. yesterday when they saw the masked man and chased him to 11 S. Carey St., where he was caught as he stuffed the ski cap and hobo mask into his pocket, police said. Police said they also recovered suspected cocaine and a .38 Special revolver from the man. Nagi Abdo, the owner of a convenience store in the 1200 block of W. Baltimore St., identified the suspect as the man who had robbed him and his wife at gunpoint.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | May 12, 1993
Two Edgewater women have sued the Anne Arundel County animal shelter for killing their dog even though they reported it missing the day it disappeared and repeatedly called the shelter to see if it had turned up.The suit, filed Monday in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, charges that shelter employees were "uncooperative, uncaring, unfriendly and hostile" when the women tried to find Hobo, their black and brown mixed German shepherd, and seeks $56,000 in...
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1999
If you spend weekends with Jonny O the BBQ Hobo, you learn things about barbecue.You learn that if you want to eat a 97-pound pig for Sunday supper you start cooking it by Saturday noon. You learn that a good way to get hickory wood, one of the required fuels of authentic barbecue, is to have a friend in the excavating business. He'll keep you in hickory stumps if you cook a few pigs for him.You learn that when you're eating authentic barbecued chicken, you do not get alarmed if the meat is red. It's a sign that the chicken has been smoked, not that it's under-cooked.
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