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By KATHLEEN PARRISH and KATHLEEN PARRISH,MORNING CALL | April 30, 2006
Narathi Palua is sewing in the tropical sunshine. His long fingers deftly pull a silver needle through the heavy fabric. He is 13, gangly, all legs and arms and neck, but his feet - easily a size 10 - anchor his frame and portend a growth spurt. He could be riding his bike through the overgrown paths of the surrounding jungle or collecting crabs in the cool waters of the Yom River. Instead, he is making an American quilt likely destined for Lancaster County, Pa. In Narathi's village of Ban Pa Deang, quilts spill from the open doorways of homes, women drive by on motor scooters clutching rolled-up quilts wrapped in clear plastic, and porches have been converted to outdoor sewing rooms where scraps of fabric litter the tiled floors like a calico snowstorm.
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NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | January 9, 2009
Does self-love mean never having to say you're sorry? Clint Eastwood directed and plays the lead role in Gran Torino, and it's come out as a mash note to the star who, like him or not (and I sometimes do), transformed himself from a TV hunk to the most durable big-screen hard guy of our time. It's engineered, coarsely but shrewdly, to exploit his gnarly side while enabling him to try a little tenderness. It's a star turn of a particularly obvious kind. (No wonder it's been talked about for Oscars.
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NEWS
By Joshua Kurlantzick and Joshua Kurlantzick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 14, 2000
VIENTIANE, Laos - A brutal clash is brewing between Laos' Communist rulers and ethnic Hmong insurgents over government plans to force people from mountain villages to other areas of the country. The Hmong fighters - remnants of a guerrilla army trained by the CIA during the Vietnam War - have been battling the government since the Communists took over in 1975 and the CIA pulled out of Laos. But the guerrillas have intensified their campaign lately as Laos' secretive regime, dominated by ethnic Lao, has tightened control of the country, partly through its unpopular transmigration policy.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 14, 2007
GREEN BAY, Wis. --As with most unsolved killings, there are more questions than answers about why Cha Vang, a Hmong immigrant from Laos, was shot to death while hunting squirrels in the deep woods north of here last weekend. But by far the biggest question for Vang's survivors and the greater Hmong community across Wisconsin and Minnesota is whether he was killed in retaliation for the shooting deaths of six white hunters two years ago by another Hmong, who, though unrelated, shared the same last name.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 8, 1999
ST. PAUL -- In Minnesota, where being white and Lutheran is as commonplace as being snowed-in during the winter, the throng of Asian immigrants stood out from the beginning. Everything about the Hmong was different: the way they looked and spoke, the way they ate and dressed, the way they prayed and lived. In the mid-1990s, as they migrated by the tens of thousands and settled into rundown, low-rent neighborhoods throughout the Twin Cities, a deep but unspoken tension developed between the newcomers and the longtime locals.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 29, 1996
FRESNO, Calif. -- Two dozen Hmong refugees, some of the last wandering faces of the Vietnam War, stepped off a bus in Fresno on Wednesday to the cries and embrace of long-lost family, their 20-year journey finally complete.Ge Xiong, who settled in America with her husband in 1979, kept stroking the weary faces of her mother, brother and sister."It's you," she wept. "It's you."The trek had taken them from mountain huts in Laos in the mid 1970s to a life of deadlock in Thailand refugee camps -- caught between dreams of one day returning home and the uncertainty of America.
NEWS
March 15, 1999
Sun's Hmong story was not an accurate portrayal of cultureKirsten Scharnberg's article "Surviving culture shock" (March 8) is the kind of media portrayal that caused me to start the Hmong Tribune.The article proliferates the idea that the Hmong are a backward, preliterate people who are isolated from mainstream society -- a novelty to be studied, occasionally, a group not surviving in American society.It may not be the writer's intent, but the damage was done. The article was unbalanced. This culture is full of success stories.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | January 9, 2009
Does self-love mean never having to say you're sorry? Clint Eastwood directed and plays the lead role in Gran Torino, and it's come out as a mash note to the star who, like him or not (and I sometimes do), transformed himself from a TV hunk to the most durable big-screen hard guy of our time. It's engineered, coarsely but shrewdly, to exploit his gnarly side while enabling him to try a little tenderness. It's a star turn of a particularly obvious kind. (No wonder it's been talked about for Oscars.
NEWS
By MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE | January 30, 2005
MINNEAPOLIS - Active cases of tuberculosis among newly arriving Hmong immigrants to the United States have prompted a temporary halt to the latest wave of refugees coming from Thailand, State Department and health officials said. A 19-year-old in Minnesota has a confirmed case of the bacterial lung disease, and four other unrelated Hmong immigrants in the state are suspected to have contracted tuberculosis, according to Kris Ehresmann, an expert at the Minnesota Department of Health. There are four confirmed cases in Wisconsin, a handful in California and several more at the Wat Tham Krabok refugee camp in Thailand, where 6,000 of the 15,000 residents resettling in the United States are awaiting flights.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 14, 2007
GREEN BAY, Wis. --As with most unsolved killings, there are more questions than answers about why Cha Vang, a Hmong immigrant from Laos, was shot to death while hunting squirrels in the deep woods north of here last weekend. But by far the biggest question for Vang's survivors and the greater Hmong community across Wisconsin and Minnesota is whether he was killed in retaliation for the shooting deaths of six white hunters two years ago by another Hmong, who, though unrelated, shared the same last name.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARRISH and KATHLEEN PARRISH,MORNING CALL | April 30, 2006
Narathi Palua is sewing in the tropical sunshine. His long fingers deftly pull a silver needle through the heavy fabric. He is 13, gangly, all legs and arms and neck, but his feet - easily a size 10 - anchor his frame and portend a growth spurt. He could be riding his bike through the overgrown paths of the surrounding jungle or collecting crabs in the cool waters of the Yom River. Instead, he is making an American quilt likely destined for Lancaster County, Pa. In Narathi's village of Ban Pa Deang, quilts spill from the open doorways of homes, women drive by on motor scooters clutching rolled-up quilts wrapped in clear plastic, and porches have been converted to outdoor sewing rooms where scraps of fabric litter the tiled floors like a calico snowstorm.
NEWS
By MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE | January 30, 2005
MINNEAPOLIS - Active cases of tuberculosis among newly arriving Hmong immigrants to the United States have prompted a temporary halt to the latest wave of refugees coming from Thailand, State Department and health officials said. A 19-year-old in Minnesota has a confirmed case of the bacterial lung disease, and four other unrelated Hmong immigrants in the state are suspected to have contracted tuberculosis, according to Kris Ehresmann, an expert at the Minnesota Department of Health. There are four confirmed cases in Wisconsin, a handful in California and several more at the Wat Tham Krabok refugee camp in Thailand, where 6,000 of the 15,000 residents resettling in the United States are awaiting flights.
NEWS
By Joshua Kurlantzick and Joshua Kurlantzick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 14, 2000
VIENTIANE, Laos - A brutal clash is brewing between Laos' Communist rulers and ethnic Hmong insurgents over government plans to force people from mountain villages to other areas of the country. The Hmong fighters - remnants of a guerrilla army trained by the CIA during the Vietnam War - have been battling the government since the Communists took over in 1975 and the CIA pulled out of Laos. But the guerrillas have intensified their campaign lately as Laos' secretive regime, dominated by ethnic Lao, has tightened control of the country, partly through its unpopular transmigration policy.
NEWS
March 15, 1999
Sun's Hmong story was not an accurate portrayal of cultureKirsten Scharnberg's article "Surviving culture shock" (March 8) is the kind of media portrayal that caused me to start the Hmong Tribune.The article proliferates the idea that the Hmong are a backward, preliterate people who are isolated from mainstream society -- a novelty to be studied, occasionally, a group not surviving in American society.It may not be the writer's intent, but the damage was done. The article was unbalanced. This culture is full of success stories.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 8, 1999
ST. PAUL -- In Minnesota, where being white and Lutheran is as commonplace as being snowed-in during the winter, the throng of Asian immigrants stood out from the beginning. Everything about the Hmong was different: the way they looked and spoke, the way they ate and dressed, the way they prayed and lived. In the mid-1990s, as they migrated by the tens of thousands and settled into rundown, low-rent neighborhoods throughout the Twin Cities, a deep but unspoken tension developed between the newcomers and the longtime locals.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 29, 1996
FRESNO, Calif. -- Two dozen Hmong refugees, some of the last wandering faces of the Vietnam War, stepped off a bus in Fresno on Wednesday to the cries and embrace of long-lost family, their 20-year journey finally complete.Ge Xiong, who settled in America with her husband in 1979, kept stroking the weary faces of her mother, brother and sister."It's you," she wept. "It's you."The trek had taken them from mountain huts in Laos in the mid 1970s to a life of deadlock in Thailand refugee camps -- caught between dreams of one day returning home and the uncertainty of America.
NEWS
July 16, 2004
IN RECENT weeks, the likely last big wave of Lao Hmong refugees began arriving in the United States from a squalid encampment at a Buddhist temple in Thailand -- primarily bound for established enclaves in California's Central Valley, the Minneapolis-St. Paul area and Wisconsin. Their exodus to America is very welcome and long overdue and underscores the United States' incomplete relationship with Laos some 40 years after America began waging covert war there with intensive bombing to disrupt North Vietnamese supply lines.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 9, 1995
WAT THAM KRABOK, Thailand -- They have no nation to call home. They live in constant fear the Thai government will deport them to Laos, their former homeland. But they do have one powerful man in their corner.For the 15,000 Hmong illegally squatting on the back 40 acres of Wat Tham Krabok, a Buddhist temple, the powers of the abbot have kept the Thai government at bay -- so far.The abbot has turned his temple into Thailand's major sanctuary for people unable or unwilling to qualify for U.S. political asylum.
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