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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2001
When Gov. Parris N. Glendening signs a landmark gay rights bill into law today, the occasion will be exciting yet bittersweet for one Montgomery County legislator. Del. Sheila E. Hixson has been introducing essentially the same anti-discrimination bill every year since 1993, and the ceremony will mark one of the most significant milestones in her 25-year legislative career. But missing from the crowd celebrating the end of her long struggle will be her son, Richard Hixson, a gay man who died in December at the age of 40. He lived long enough to see his mother win House approval of the bill in 1999, but wasn't there for the Senate breakthrough that led to the success of her cause.
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NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,sun reporter | January 13, 2007
The latest attempt to upgrade or replace the state's paperless voting equipment was launched yesterday in the House of Delegates. Legislation proposed by Del. Sheila E. Hixson, a Montgomery County Democrat and chairwoman of the ways and means committee, would enable voters to review a paper record of their choices before their ballots become official. The goal of the legislation is to avoid the drama still unfolding in Sarasota County, Fla. -- where voting machines might not have registered the choices of 18,000 voters in a hotly contested congressional race in November.
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NEWS
January 7, 2004
On January 3, 2004, JOSEPHINE K. BERGSTEDT of Millersville. Beloved wife of the late Vernon Hixson and Edward L. Bergstedt and her son Jacob G. Hixson and his son Ronald and daughter Judy; devoted mother of Dianna Rizzutto and her husband Joseph, their three children, Joseph E., Jody and Justin and their children Sarah, Rachael, Sophia and Antonio. Her son Vernon Hixson and his family, Vernon Jr., Jenifer and Alisa Lefil and great-grandson Alexian. Her son Jacob (Bud) Hixson and his family Jacob, Vernon David and John Michael, one great-granddaughter and one great great-granddaughter.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2004
The Ehrlich administration is pushing to undo the General Assembly's changes to the state's historic preservation tax credit, a sparkplug of Baltimore's revitalization efforts, after a Senate committee agreed to amendments limiting the program's benefits to the city. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. expressed optimism that the administration's differences with House Ways and Means Committee Chairwoman Sheila E. Hixson will be resolved. However, some of the program's strongest supporters said the changes, originally made in Hixson's committee Thursday, are damaging enough that it might be better if the bill were killed.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2000
Hoping to take advantage of Maryland's record surplus, two key lawmakers are proposing to increase the amount of money returned to the working poor under the state's earned income tax credit program. Del. Sheila E. Hixson, who chairs the House Ways and Means Committee, said yesterday she will introduce legislation to refund more money to low-income families under a formula based on their federal tax return. "In a time when obviously there's so much money, the people who need it the most should benefit," said Hixson, a Montgomery County Democrat.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2004
The chairwoman of the House committee that oversees gambling said yesterday that she will not permit slots legislation to move forward unless Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. agrees to a tax package of at least $500 million - a demand that could prove insurmountable. "Our position is that if there is going to be a slots bill, we want it to have another revenue source," said Del. Sheila E. Hixson, a Montgomery County Democrat and chairwoman of the House Ways and Means Committee. "We're not going to do slots unless we have taxes, too."
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | February 12, 1992
LAUREL -- Representatives of racetrack owners and horsemen will be in Annapolis tomorrow to oppose cruise ship and riverboat gambling bills that have been introduced in the House of Delegates by Del. Sheila Hixson, D-Montgomery.One bill would permit gambling in Maryland waters, specifically on large cruise ships that now bypass the Baltimore harbor because gambling is not allowed.The other Hixson bill would permit riverboat gambling on any navigable Maryland stream under designated conditions.
NEWS
May 19, 1993
Loyalty has its rewards. Just look at ever-loyal Del. Tyras S Athey, a quiet, obedient spear carrier for speakers of the House since in 1966. For his faithfulness, Mr. Athey, now chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, is being named secretary of state, a superfluous job that comes with a whopping salary of $70,000 a year.Then look at loyal Del. Sheila Hixson, whose allegiance to House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell likely will lead to her reward as the new leader of Ways and Means. When a rump faction from her own Montgomery County tried to dump Mr. Mitchell last winter, Ms. Hixson remained by his side; when Mr. Mitchell's friend Del. John Arnick was under attack for sexism in his bid for a judgeship, Ms. Hixson led the women's caucus into an endorsement of the would-be judge, a position the group never recanted even as support for Mr. Arnick vanished.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2003
CAMBRIDGE -- A leading Democratic lawmaker outlined an array of taxes she wants the General Assembly to consider next year to balance the state budget, a list that drew a prickly response from the business group that invited her to present her ideas. Del. Sheila E. Hixson of Montgomery County said the Ways and Means Committee she heads will consider adding a new top bracket to the state income tax structure, meaning the state's wealthiest residents could pay more. Hixson said her committee would also consider expanding the list of items subject to sales tax to include services such as automobile repairs, and increasing the gasoline and vehicle title taxes to generate money for roads and other transportation projects.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,sun reporter | January 13, 2007
The latest attempt to upgrade or replace the state's paperless voting equipment was launched yesterday in the House of Delegates. Legislation proposed by Del. Sheila E. Hixson, a Montgomery County Democrat and chairwoman of the ways and means committee, would enable voters to review a paper record of their choices before their ballots become official. The goal of the legislation is to avoid the drama still unfolding in Sarasota County, Fla. -- where voting machines might not have registered the choices of 18,000 voters in a hotly contested congressional race in November.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2004
The chairwoman of the House committee that oversees gambling said yesterday that she will not permit slots legislation to move forward unless Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. agrees to a tax package of at least $500 million - a demand that could prove insurmountable. "Our position is that if there is going to be a slots bill, we want it to have another revenue source," said Del. Sheila E. Hixson, a Montgomery County Democrat and chairwoman of the House Ways and Means Committee. "We're not going to do slots unless we have taxes, too."
NEWS
January 7, 2004
On January 3, 2004, JOSEPHINE K. BERGSTEDT of Millersville. Beloved wife of the late Vernon Hixson and Edward L. Bergstedt and her son Jacob G. Hixson and his son Ronald and daughter Judy; devoted mother of Dianna Rizzutto and her husband Joseph, their three children, Joseph E., Jody and Justin and their children Sarah, Rachael, Sophia and Antonio. Her son Vernon Hixson and his family, Vernon Jr., Jenifer and Alisa Lefil and great-grandson Alexian. Her son Jacob (Bud) Hixson and his family Jacob, Vernon David and John Michael, one great-granddaughter and one great great-granddaughter.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2003
CAMBRIDGE -- A leading Democratic lawmaker outlined an array of taxes she wants the General Assembly to consider next year to balance the state budget, a list that drew a prickly response from the business group that invited her to present her ideas. Del. Sheila E. Hixson of Montgomery County said the Ways and Means Committee she heads will consider adding a new top bracket to the state income tax structure, meaning the state's wealthiest residents could pay more. Hixson said her committee would also consider expanding the list of items subject to sales tax to include services such as automobile repairs, and increasing the gasoline and vehicle title taxes to generate money for roads and other transportation projects.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2001
When Gov. Parris N. Glendening signs a landmark gay rights bill into law today, the occasion will be exciting yet bittersweet for one Montgomery County legislator. Del. Sheila E. Hixson has been introducing essentially the same anti-discrimination bill every year since 1993, and the ceremony will mark one of the most significant milestones in her 25-year legislative career. But missing from the crowd celebrating the end of her long struggle will be her son, Richard Hixson, a gay man who died in December at the age of 40. He lived long enough to see his mother win House approval of the bill in 1999, but wasn't there for the Senate breakthrough that led to the success of her cause.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2000
Although legislative leaders began the General Assembly session saying they hoped to cut income taxes this year, top lawmakers now say there is little support for the idea. "There's no enthusiasm for it," said House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr., who introduced legislation to provide a cut. "It might not be the best thing to do," said Sen. Barbara A. Hoffman, chairwoman of the Senate budget committee. "There's no groundswell for doing it at the moment." The Assembly approved a 10 percent tax cut in 1997 that is being phased in. More than half of it -- 6 percent -- has taken effect, but no further reduction is scheduled until next year.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2000
Hoping to take advantage of Maryland's record surplus, two key lawmakers are proposing to increase the amount of money returned to the working poor under the state's earned income tax credit program. Del. Sheila E. Hixson, who chairs the House Ways and Means Committee, said yesterday she will introduce legislation to refund more money to low-income families under a formula based on their federal tax return. "In a time when obviously there's so much money, the people who need it the most should benefit," said Hixson, a Montgomery County Democrat.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2004
The Ehrlich administration is pushing to undo the General Assembly's changes to the state's historic preservation tax credit, a sparkplug of Baltimore's revitalization efforts, after a Senate committee agreed to amendments limiting the program's benefits to the city. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. expressed optimism that the administration's differences with House Ways and Means Committee Chairwoman Sheila E. Hixson will be resolved. However, some of the program's strongest supporters said the changes, originally made in Hixson's committee Thursday, are damaging enough that it might be better if the bill were killed.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1997
Some members of the House of Delegates are trying once again to kill Maryland's $9 million legislative scholarship program because of criticism that it is more of a patronage tool than a means of providing student aid.But as usual, senators -- who dole out as much as $138,000 apiece, or more than 10 times what each delegate can award -- don't appear willing to give up the program, at least not this year."
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1997
Some members of the House of Delegates are trying once again to kill Maryland's $9 million legislative scholarship program because of criticism that it is more of a patronage tool than a means of providing student aid.But as usual, senators -- who dole out as much as $138,000 apiece, or more than 10 times what each delegate can award -- don't appear willing to give up the program, at least not this year."
NEWS
May 19, 1993
Loyalty has its rewards. Just look at ever-loyal Del. Tyras S Athey, a quiet, obedient spear carrier for speakers of the House since in 1966. For his faithfulness, Mr. Athey, now chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, is being named secretary of state, a superfluous job that comes with a whopping salary of $70,000 a year.Then look at loyal Del. Sheila Hixson, whose allegiance to House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell likely will lead to her reward as the new leader of Ways and Means. When a rump faction from her own Montgomery County tried to dump Mr. Mitchell last winter, Ms. Hixson remained by his side; when Mr. Mitchell's friend Del. John Arnick was under attack for sexism in his bid for a judgeship, Ms. Hixson led the women's caucus into an endorsement of the would-be judge, a position the group never recanted even as support for Mr. Arnick vanished.
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