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By Joe and Teresa Graedon | December 14, 2009
Question: : My son, age 14, has suffered from chronic idiopathic urticaria (hives) for five years. Several months ago, your column featured another person suffering from hives. He had success with vitamin C, so we decided to try it. My son is now taking 1,000 mg of vitamin C twice a day. He has been able to stop two of his three medications, Zyrtec and famotidine. With his doctor's approval, he has halved his Allegra prescription. We are so thankful! Answer: : We found nothing recent in the medical literature on this approach.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | March 3, 2013
Sufferers of chronic hives and rashes could benefit from a commonly-used asthma drug, Johns Hopkins researchers have found. Scientists found that a once-a-month dose of the drug omalizumab helped ease symptoms that standard antihistamines didn't. The drug was tested on 323 peple at 55 medical centers from 2009 to 2011. The subjects were mostly women and between the ages of 12 and 75. The participants had suffered with chronic hives and rash for at least six months and many had dealt with the condition for more than five years.
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NEWS
By Mary Gold | April 7, 1991
The common honey bee is not on the endangered species list -- at least, not yet. But its numbers are dwindling dramatically here in Howard County and throughout the United States. Thomas Price, president ofthe Howard County Beekeepers Association, is worried. All of the bees in eight of his 10 hives died over the past winter, and those losses are mirrored throughout the county this year.Tiny mites are theculprits. Two predatory mite species that have invaded the U.S. in the past few years use any member of the bee family as hosts, and theymean death to the bees they infest.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
A traveling EDM festival might have seemed like a far-fetched notion, but Live Nation's IDentity is returning this year, with a show planned at Jiffy Lube Live again. The festival, which last year attracted big-timer Kaskade, back when when he didn't headline arenas, and Hercules and Love Affair, consists of genre stars - this year it's Wolfgang Gartner, Nero, and Paul Van Dyk, among others - taking turns at the turntables for several hours before an arena crowd. Kaskade, presumably, was busy with his own arena tour . Live Nation did not disclose last year's attendance numbers with Billboard, which ran the press release . Nice detail: "IDENTITY's sponsors include Rockstar Energy Drink, Emazing Lights, Slurpee, TIGI Bedhead, and Lifestyle Condoms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Hilburn and Robert Hilburn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 22, 2004
One reason this Swedish quintet was such a refreshing arrival here two years ago was that it came with a secret weapon: a smile. From its snappy wardrobe and self-congratulatory stage patter to its hyperactive mix of punk and garage rock, the Hives seemed not only smart but also blessed with a limitless imagination. "Yes, America, you love us," lead singer Howlin' Pelle Almqvist told the opening-night audience that spring at the Roxy in Los Angeles. "We've come to take over your country and change everything.
NEWS
By Glenn Collins and Glenn Collins,New York Times News Service | October 1, 1999
NEW YORK The setting -- the rooftop of a brownstone on West 113th Street in Manhattan -- hardly evoked the lazy bee-hum of rusticity. Looming to the north was the brick bulk of Butler Library at Columbia University. To the southeast jutted the latticework scaffolding of the ever-unfinished Cathedral of St. John the Divine.Suddenly, the swirl of bees hanging around two honeybee hives formed a cloud about the heads of four of the brownstone's inhabitants, Jill Laurie Goodman and her three children, urban beekeepers all. "Just look at them," Ms. Goodman said proudly of her bees, as if she were acknowledging a blue-ribbon Charolais steer at the county fair.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
Tiny European honeybees certainly aren't pets, but are they farm animals? That's how Howard County zoning enforcement officials classified them after retiree Sam Peperone complained nearly two years ago about his backyard neighbor's beehives in Columbia. A swarm of the honeybees buzzed around the water dripping from his air conditioner in April 2008, and the federal retiree feared his grandchildren could be stung and his home's value diminished, he said. But instead of eliminating Dan and Jeri Hemerlein's hives, Peperone's complaint has stirred up a community of bee enthusiasts to press the county for a change in the zoning law, and it looks as if they might succeed.
NEWS
April 30, 2007
Billions od commercially employed honeybees - vital to the production of nearly 100 food crops across North America -- have buzz off. Beekeepers say their industrious workers have been vanishing mysteriously from stores, their developing offspring and a forlorn queen and her attendants. There have been other such "colony collapses," or "dwindles," in past decades, experts say. But this one appears to be the most serious - in the number of abandoned hives, their coast-to-coast geography and their duration.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2011
The tiny honeybees in Dan and Jeri Hemerlein's six hives in their big Columbia backyard are dedicated work-a-day drudges, oblivious to the passions they've stirred in humans across Maryland. But in a search for water next door in retiree Sam Peperone's yard, the bees set off a Howard County zoning fight that has lasted close to three years and drawn hundreds of bee supporters to a series of public hearings over the last 18 months. The local dispute has highlighted what experts say is a global trend, and Howard County has become a flashpoint in the debate over growing interest among home beekeepers, more than 3,000 of whom are registered in Maryland alone.
NEWS
June 27, 2004
For people with severe venom allergy, insect stings may be life-threatening. They may experience itching and hives, swelling in the throat or tongue, difficulty breathing, dizziness, stomach cramps, nausea or diarrhea and even shock and loss of consciousness. -- American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2011
As Jason Hough steers his Chevy Silverado along the curving country roads of western Howard County, he makes a habit of stopping and slowly backing up his truck to trade friendly gibes with fellow farmers he's caught sight of in his rearview mirror. One neighbor, after confiding that his alfalfa isn't drying all that well in the recent humidity, promises he won't snitch to Hough's wife about his female passenger. Another wants to know why a reporter riding shotgun doesn't have anything better to do than write about honeybees.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2011
The tiny honeybees in Dan and Jeri Hemerlein's six hives in their big Columbia backyard are dedicated work-a-day drudges, oblivious to the passions they've stirred in humans across Maryland. But in a search for water next door in retiree Sam Peperone's yard, the bees set off a Howard County zoning fight that has lasted close to three years and drawn hundreds of bee supporters to a series of public hearings over the last 18 months. The local dispute has highlighted what experts say is a global trend, and Howard County has become a flashpoint in the debate over growing interest among home beekeepers, more than 3,000 of whom are registered in Maryland alone.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | February 7, 2010
Howard County beekeepers are looking to the County Council for zoning relief after the planning board unanimously recommended denial of a proposal that would allow hives within 25 feet of an adjoining property. The board also concluded hearing testimony Thursday night on a plan to build 325 new homes on a portion of historic Doughoregan Manor but put off discussion of a recommendation on that issue until Feb. 19. Bees are now in the same zoning category as farm animals in Howard, which means the hives must be at least 200 feet from an adjoining property, a rule so restrictive it prompted an outpouring of support in November from beekeepers across the Baltimore area advocating for a change.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | December 14, 2009
Question: : My son, age 14, has suffered from chronic idiopathic urticaria (hives) for five years. Several months ago, your column featured another person suffering from hives. He had success with vitamin C, so we decided to try it. My son is now taking 1,000 mg of vitamin C twice a day. He has been able to stop two of his three medications, Zyrtec and famotidine. With his doctor's approval, he has halved his Allegra prescription. We are so thankful! Answer: : We found nothing recent in the medical literature on this approach.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
Tiny European honeybees certainly aren't pets, but are they farm animals? That's how Howard County zoning enforcement officials classified them after retiree Sam Peperone complained nearly two years ago about his backyard neighbor's beehives in Columbia. A swarm of the honeybees buzzed around the water dripping from his air conditioner in April 2008, and the federal retiree feared his grandchildren could be stung and his home's value diminished, he said. But instead of eliminating Dan and Jeri Hemerlein's hives, Peperone's complaint has stirred up a community of bee enthusiasts to press the county for a change in the zoning law, and it looks as if they might succeed.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | August 24, 2009
Question: : I have to use insect repellent every time I go outside. When I also need sunscreen, which goes on first? Answer: : This straightforward question has no simple answer. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that "sunscreens should be applied to the skin before insect repellents." In the next sentence, however, the CDC advises travelers not to use combination products containing both repellents and sunscreens. It points out that "DEET-containing insect repellents may decrease the effectiveness of sunscreens and sunscreens may increase absorption of DEET through the skin."
NEWS
July 6, 1993
Dr. Ralph Hudson Johnson, 59, director of postgraduate medical education and training at Oxford University, died after being stung by a swarm of bees Thursday, police said. Dr. Johnson was tending his hives at his home in the village of Overy, southeast of Oxford, when the swarm got under his hat and face mask. He was stung hundreds of times on his head and face, collapsed and died, Oxford police said Sunday.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | May 15, 2008
It is the season of baseball games, picnics, backyard barbecues ... and all kinds of insects. If you've ever been stung by a bee or wasp, you know it's no fun at all. For many people, a sting can be a serious matter, says Dr. David Golden, associate professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University and chief of the allergy division at Franklin Square and Sinai hospitals. What constitutes an allergic reaction to insect stings? There are different kinds of allergic reactions: If you get stung and have pain and itching, that is normal.
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