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By Sarah Tan, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2010
The Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland, in partnership with a number of faith-based volunteer groups, set up clinics at churches and faith-based community centers around Baltimore Monday to provide free HIV testing services and to raise awareness about getting tested. Maryland has the second-highest HIV/AIDS infection rate in the nation, according to Dr. Robert Redfield, director of clinical care at IHV, who joined advocates, politicians and volunteers at Seventh Metro Baptist Church in the Charles North neighborhood.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Local medical professionals will gather with members of Baltimore's gay community later this month to discuss a new medical treatment that involves HIV-negative patients taking a daily pill to avoid becoming infected. The April 28 forum, hosted by the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore, will cover the use of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, or PrEP, which "has been shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection among adult men and women at very high risk for HIV infection through sex or injecting drug use," according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | July 18, 1995
Boston. -- It's almost nine months now, nearly a full gestation period. Time to come to term, or at least to terms, with a new point of view.In November, there was something akin to good news in the often gloomy world of AIDS research. A federal study found that HIV- infected women who took the drug AZT during their pregnancy could reduce the risk of transmitting the virus to their babies by as much as two-thirds.This not only changed the odds of having a healthy baby, it added weight to the importance of HIV testing.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
A broad coalition of government agencies and non-profit organizations will be offering free HIV testing in Baltimore on Friday - which is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. The events and the national initiative are efforts  "to encourage African Americans to get educated, get tested, get involved, and get treated for HIV/AIDS," according to the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, which is helping to host the events. “HIV education and testing are key, and adherence to HIV medications helps to prevent the spread of HIV to others, ” said Dr. Laura Herrera, the state's deputy secretary for public health services, in a statement.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | November 21, 2008
Despite federal regulations that virtually all adults be routinely tested for HIV in emergency rooms and doctors' offices, people at risk for contracting the virus are not getting tested, a coalition of researchers and health experts has warned. The Forum for Collaborative HIV Research, based at George Washington University's School of Public Health, said yesterday that testing is the key to ending the epidemic in the United States. Of the nation's estimated 1.1 million people living with HIV, one in five do not know it and those who are being diagnosed are learning the news too late, the group said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,sun reporter | February 7, 2007
Amid mounting concern over the heavy burden of HIV/AIDS on the black community, public and private groups throughout the region will offer free testing today in observance of National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. "I haven't seen another issue with the kind of community involvement we have on AIDS," Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, Baltimore's health commissioner, said at a news conference yesterday. Sharfstein and other health advocates urged people of all races who aren't sure of their HIV status to have themselves tested and, if they test positive, to enter counseling and treatment programs.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2001
Hoping to stem the skyrocketing number of new HIV cases in Northwest Baltimore, politicians, health officials and community leaders are launching a wide-ranging initiative today so that more residents are tested for the deadly virus and counseled. The plan includes new testing sites and drug treatment slots, as well as tapping such resources as churches, anti-crime programs and social service agencies. The Maryland Partners PUSH Campaign (Partners United to Stop HIV) is spending what some consider a modest sum on the problem - about $90,000 - and the ideas are not new. But observers say the effort, which Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat, are announcing in conjunction with World AIDS Day, which is tomorrow, is a significant step to turn around dismal statistics.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporter | September 22, 2006
Federal health officials recommended yesterday that HIV testing become a routine part of medical care for everyone ages 13 to 64, reversing old guidelines that directed most tests to people considered at high risk. Under the policy, announced by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, tests would be offered by primary care doctors and in emergency rooms, community health centers, substance abuse programs, prisons and other settings where patients receive care. Routine tests would reach many of the estimated 250,000 people in the U.S. who unknowingly carry the virus that causes AIDS, Dr. Julie L. Gerberding, the CDC director, said in a conference call.
NEWS
By Angela J. Bass and Angela J. Bass,angela.bass@baltsun.com | July 22, 2009
Saying they have been too silent for too long in the fight against HIV and AIDS, leaders of several Baltimore faith-based groups converted nearly a dozen churches Tuesday into places where people could be tested for the virus without fear of being stigmatized. The JACQUES Initiative - a program at the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine - launched Project SHALEM in partnership with the Maryland AIDS Administration and several local faith-based and community organizations.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
Battling one of the nation's worst HIV epidemics, Baltimore has joined a growing list of cities to employ a test that detects the virus at an early stage of infection - and could lead authorities to "hot spots" where the virus is being transmitted. Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, the city's health commissioner, said his department recently made the test available at the city's east- and west-side health clinics. The agency also plans to make it available through community organizations offering HIV testing and counseling.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 3, 2014
Many young people are not getting timely treatment for their HIV infections, and that is putting their long-term health at risk and threatening the health of their partners, a new study from Johns Hopkins Children's Center found. Evidence suggests early treatment can help manage the disease as a chronic condition and stave off dangerous infections and other damage. Researchers didn't study why but they believe young people, particularly heterosexual men and minorities, are not seeking the care immediately after they are infected, either because they don't know they are infected or because they are purposefully waiting.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | December 1, 2013
On Monday, Dec. 2, in support of World AIDS Day, the Harford County Health Department will offer free walk-in confidential or anonymous HIV testing at 1 N. Main Street in Bel Air, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Since 1988, World AIDS Day is observed annually on Dec. 1 by the National Centers for Disease Control along with public health partners locally and worldwide. According to the Harford Health Department, this year's theme, "Working Together for an AIDS-Free Generation," highlights the promise of new research and prevention efforts to help stop the spread of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, also known as HIV. Since the beginning of the epidemic, approximately 70 million people have been infected with HIV and more than 35 million people have died from the virus, making it one of the most destructive pandemics in history, the health department notes in a news release.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Appearing as Malik "Poot" Carr for five seasons on "The Wire," Tray Chaney enjoyed one of the longest lives any drug dealer has ever had in prime time. "I was so lucky in my very first acting role," says Chaney, now living in La Plata, Charles County. "You can't be any more blessed than that starting out. " He's intent on sharing some of that blessed feeling. The father of two runs a production company and has a new film coming out in December. He's promoting HIV testing for the Prince George's County Health Department and making appearances and a music video for United Way of Maryland.
NEWS
September 20, 2013
Calendar Wellness programs: Howard County General Hospital will offer the following classes in September. Unless otherwise listed all classes will be held in the Wellness Center, 10710 Charter Drive, Suite 100, Columbia. Information: http://www.hcgh.org or 410-740-7601. •A beginners' eight-week prenatal exercise program will be offered from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Tuesdays, beginning Sept. 24 or Thursdays, beginning Sept. 26 Cost: $88 for the 8 week sessions. •Smoke-free classes.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | June 25, 2013
The Institute of Human Virology at The University of Maryland School of Medicine hopes to test 1,000 people for HIV or get them connected to comprehensive health services. The testing and services will be offered at three Baltimore churches and a community center today. The effort is ahead of National HIV Testing Day, which is Thursday. Those interested can head to Payne Memorial A.M.E. Church from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. The testing will also be offered 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Unity United Methodist Church and the Esperanza Center from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. St. Matthew's New Life United Methodist Church will test from 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. The events are led by JACQUES Initiative's Project SHALEM, a program under the Institute of Human Virology.
NEWS
July 20, 2012
Its incredible that with all of the articles on HIV and AIDS, the fact that the FDA has finally approved of a 15-minute over-the-counter test for HIV has barely been mentioned ("Rapid at-home HIV test gains federal approval," July 4). You talk about unprotected sex, you talk about abstinence, you talk about condoms, etc., but here we have a method to "privately and immediately " determine whether your partner is HIV positive. One would think this would be a strong deterrent for unprotected sex, but it seems like it's a taboo subject.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1994
Nineteen people in Harford County died of AIDS in the year that ended March 31, 1994, nearly doubling the number who died of the disease the previous year.The statistics were included in a communicable disease update presented to the County Council Tuesday by county Health Officer Thomas M. Thomas and his staff.Mr. Thomas also noted that 96 cases of AIDS have been reported in Harford County. That figure has more than doubled since 1991, he told the council, which also sits as the Board of Health.
NEWS
July 16, 2006
Military changes could bring 45,000 jobs In a draft report prepared for the state Department of Business and Economic Development, Towson University's research and consulting arm forecasts that the national military base shuffling ordered last year could yield more than 45,000 jobs for the state -- many of them high-paying civilian military and defense contractor positions moving to Aberdeen Proving Ground and Fort Meade. City offers new HIV testing Baltimore health officials are employing a test that detects the HIV virus at an early stage of infection, hoping it could quickly lead them to "hot spots" where the virus is being transmitted.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 25, 2012
As National HIV Testing Day approaches, there will be a testing event held this week in Baltimore and the launch of an educational campaign. This will be the fourth year for Project SHALEM's City Uprising HIV Outreach Day , a collaboration with the University of Maryland's JACQUES Initiative at the Institute of Human Virology. It will involved 400 volunteers to provide testing and links to care. The project has trained hundreds of people from faith, academic and community circles to test more than 5,500 people.
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