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By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
Maryland will get $12.5 million from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to fund HIV prevention activities in the counties this year, down about $604,000 from last year, according to state health officials. The money comes from a $339 million pot of money doled out to states and a small number of cities according to their disease burden. And while Maryland's HIV caseload remains high, the grant dropped some because a share of the money was peeled off so the CDC could offer additional grants for innovative projects, which will be awarded in March.
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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
At the end of 2012, there were 29,477 people in Maryland diagnosed and living with HIV or AIDS. Of those, 1,424 -- or just shy of 5 percent -- were between the ages of 13 and 24, according to the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. In an effort to raise awareness of those statistics, the department's Prevention and Health Promotion Administration has teamed up with other advocacy organizations to host a "Youth Sexual Health - HIV Prevention Summit" next week.
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NEWS
By John Donnelly and John Donnelly,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 19, 2004
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Men who are circumcised have a drastically lower rate of HIV infection than those who are not, according to new studies in Africa and India, suggesting that the ancient surgical procedure may play a role in helping prevent the spread of the deadly virus. One unpublished household survey in Kenya has shown that uncircumcised men have an HIV rate that is 11 times greater, while a second study in India has found uncircumcised men have a seven times higher rate of infection.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2012
When police accused an Edgemere man of having sex with a 13-year-old boy, most of the charges were straightforward: soliciting a minor and a related sexual offense, which together could carry up to 30 years in prison. But Baltimore County prosecutors also accused Steven Douglas Podles of knowingly attempting to transmit the HIV virus to the boy - a seldom-used, and often controversial, charge that carries an additional three years behind bars. Even as prosecutors prepare their case against Podles, the effectiveness of such laws is being debated by legislators and public health officials from Maryland to California.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn | March 27, 2012
A female condom program was highly effective in preventing HIV infections, according to a new economic analysis by researchers in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health . The analysis, published in the journal AIDS and Behavior , found the DC Females Condom program, a public-private partnership to provide and promote a type of female condom, prevent enough infections in one year to save more than $8 million in future medical care...
NEWS
By DAVID HOLTGRAVE | August 13, 2006
In 2005, there were 39 million people worldwide living with HIV, 4 million new HIV infections and just fewer than 3 million deaths because of AIDS. Four years earlier, the United Nations General Assembly Special Session on AIDS committed to substantial steps to reduce infections and provide treatment to people with HIV. Given the prevalence of HIV, as reflected in the statistics, has this commitment made a difference? Yes, but it is not nearly enough. In the past five years, for example, the number of people receiving HIV treatment worldwide has jumped more than 540 percent.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN and DAVID KOHN,SUN REPORTER | December 10, 2005
In a decision that has alarmed many public health researchers and AIDS advocates, the Bush administration is increasing the amount of HIV money that must be used to promote abstinence, while at the same time limiting funds for condoms. Opponents see the move as the latest attempt by the White House and religious conservatives to expand what they view as an unscientific and ineffective HIV prevention strategy. Critics say the approach could cost lives in the developing world. "It's outrageous and stupid," said Duff Gillespie, a professor at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.
NEWS
By Laurie Goering and Laurie Goering,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 30, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - U.S.-supported anti-AIDS policies that promote abstinence and discourage condom use among the young are likely to lead to rising HIV infection rates in Africa, a U.S. human-rights group warned yesterday in a report. In a study focused on Uganda, Human Rights Watch charged that African youths are increasingly being taught that abstinence until marriage is the only proper way to prevent HIV infection and that condom use is mainly for the promiscuous. Uganda, which receives $8 million from the U.S. government each year to promote abstinence programs for youth, "is gradually removing condoms from its HIV/AIDS strategy, and the consequences could be fatal," said Tony Tate, a researcher in Human Rights Watch's children's rights division and one of the report's authors.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | September 11, 1991
The new 21-member Governor's Council on HIV Prevention and Treatment does not include state Sen. Paula C. Hollinger, a veteran of the AIDS Advisory Council that Gov. William Donald Schaefer disbanded several months ago.Hollinger, D-Balto. Co., said, "That's absurd."The makeup of the council was made public yesterday by Schaefer.Explaining her terse reaction last night, Hollinger said: "I do chair the House subcommittee of the Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee that handles all the AIDS legislation and not serving on the council is a little bit absurd."
NEWS
By Kevin Fenton | May 27, 2009
Nearly 30 years after the discovery of HIV and AIDS, the epidemic is still ravaging black neighborhoods in Baltimore and across the nation. Unfortunately, complacency about HIV and the continued stigma associated with the disease are hindering progress by preventing too many African-Americans from seeking either HIV testing and treatment or support from their friends and family. But this is a challenge that can be overcome. At a White House event last month, the Obama administration took an important step in confronting the United States' HIV epidemic, which threatens the health of African-Americans more than any other racial or ethnic group.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2012
Sexual promiscuity fueled by alcohol and drug use led one 47-year-old Towson man to contract HIV. But when he heard about government approval of the drug Truvada to lower people's risk of getting the disease, he wasn't completely sold on it as a lifesaver. The man, who didn't want to be identified because he hasn't told some family members he is HIV-positive, worries that such a pill could end up encouraging risk-taking. "If you're going to make something readily available to people that already engage in high-risk behavior, are you not saying then that we condone this high-risk behavior, which will then add fuel to the fire?"
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn | March 27, 2012
A female condom program was highly effective in preventing HIV infections, according to a new economic analysis by researchers in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health . The analysis, published in the journal AIDS and Behavior , found the DC Females Condom program, a public-private partnership to provide and promote a type of female condom, prevent enough infections in one year to save more than $8 million in future medical care...
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
Maryland will get $12.5 million from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to fund HIV prevention activities in the counties this year, down about $604,000 from last year, according to state health officials. The money comes from a $339 million pot of money doled out to states and a small number of cities according to their disease burden. And while Maryland's HIV caseload remains high, the grant dropped some because a share of the money was peeled off so the CDC could offer additional grants for innovative projects, which will be awarded in March.
NEWS
By Kevin Fenton | May 27, 2009
Nearly 30 years after the discovery of HIV and AIDS, the epidemic is still ravaging black neighborhoods in Baltimore and across the nation. Unfortunately, complacency about HIV and the continued stigma associated with the disease are hindering progress by preventing too many African-Americans from seeking either HIV testing and treatment or support from their friends and family. But this is a challenge that can be overcome. At a White House event last month, the Obama administration took an important step in confronting the United States' HIV epidemic, which threatens the health of African-Americans more than any other racial or ethnic group.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 29, 2007
The World Health Organization recommended yesterday that circumcision immediately become part of the frontline strategy to combat AIDS - a move that the group said could save millions of lives. The benefit would be greatest in countries with widespread epidemics and low rates of circumcision, such as southern and eastern Africa, the WHO said. "The recommendations represent a significant step forward in HIV prevention," said Dr. M. Kevin De Cock, director of the WHO's HIV/AIDS Department.
NEWS
By DAVID HOLTGRAVE | August 13, 2006
In 2005, there were 39 million people worldwide living with HIV, 4 million new HIV infections and just fewer than 3 million deaths because of AIDS. Four years earlier, the United Nations General Assembly Special Session on AIDS committed to substantial steps to reduce infections and provide treatment to people with HIV. Given the prevalence of HIV, as reflected in the statistics, has this commitment made a difference? Yes, but it is not nearly enough. In the past five years, for example, the number of people receiving HIV treatment worldwide has jumped more than 540 percent.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | September 11, 1991
The new 21-member Governor's Council on HIV Prevention and Treatment does not include state Sen. Paula C. Hollinger, a veteran member of the AIDS Advisory Council that Gov. William Donald Schaefer disbanded several months ago.Hollinger, D-Balto. Co., said, "That's absurd."The makeup of the council was made public yesterday by Schaefer.Explaining her terse reaction last night, Hollinger said: "I do chair the House subcommittee of the Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee that handles all the AIDS legislation and not serving on the council is a little bit absurd."
NEWS
By From staff reports | November 27, 2000
In Baltimore City Zoo brightens holiday season with ZooLights festival The Baltimore Zoo will brighten the holiday season with its annual ZooLights festival, which runs through Jan. 1. ZooLights will be open from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays through Dec. 10, and during the same hours every evening from Dec. 14 through Jan. 1. Activities will include a walk-through light show, Santa Claus, holiday music and a train garden....
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN and DAVID KOHN,SUN REPORTER | December 10, 2005
In a decision that has alarmed many public health researchers and AIDS advocates, the Bush administration is increasing the amount of HIV money that must be used to promote abstinence, while at the same time limiting funds for condoms. Opponents see the move as the latest attempt by the White House and religious conservatives to expand what they view as an unscientific and ineffective HIV prevention strategy. Critics say the approach could cost lives in the developing world. "It's outrageous and stupid," said Duff Gillespie, a professor at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.
NEWS
By Laurie Goering and Laurie Goering,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 30, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - U.S.-supported anti-AIDS policies that promote abstinence and discourage condom use among the young are likely to lead to rising HIV infection rates in Africa, a U.S. human-rights group warned yesterday in a report. In a study focused on Uganda, Human Rights Watch charged that African youths are increasingly being taught that abstinence until marriage is the only proper way to prevent HIV infection and that condom use is mainly for the promiscuous. Uganda, which receives $8 million from the U.S. government each year to promote abstinence programs for youth, "is gradually removing condoms from its HIV/AIDS strategy, and the consequences could be fatal," said Tony Tate, a researcher in Human Rights Watch's children's rights division and one of the report's authors.
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