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By Los Angeles Times | November 8, 1991
Magic Johnson's announcement yesterday that he is retiring from professional basketball because he tested positive for the human immunodeficiency virus is a complex situation. What follows are some questions and answers to help explain the issues.Question: What causes AIDS, the acquired immune deficiency syndrome?Answer: AIDS is caused by a virus known as human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV. Unlike the viruses that cause colds and flu, HIV does not leave the body after attacking the cells.
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HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Magic Johnson may have survived for more than 20 years with HIV and is in apparent good health, but don't let the basketball legend's success story fool you. HIV and AIDS remain scourges in the African-American community, where experts say infection rates are higher than in any other demographic group — and rising fast. On Thursday, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People kicked off a campaign to enlist local pastors and ministers in spreading the word that the HIV-AIDs crisis in their communities is more severe than many realize, and that plenty can be done to help.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 2, 1998
TAMPA, Fla. -- Tom Liberti tells a story that puts a new face on the AIDS epidemic.About two years ago, Liberti, chief of the Florida Department of Health's Bureau of HIV and AIDS, attended a community meeting on AIDS in Miami. There, two people stood up -- a 75-year-old man and an 85-year-old woman.Both announced to the mostly older audience that they had the human immunodeficiency virus, which causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome. They'd contracted it through sexual activity."From that point on, you could hear a pin drop in the room," Liberti said.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2011
Millions in federal funds used to provide services to those living with HIV are again flowing to local programs after a months-long delay. Eighty one Maryland health organizations rely on about $61 million a year from the federal Ryan White Care Act to provide services for those who can't afford their own care, and some officials said they had no choice but to trim their offerings. One of them was Moveable Feast, a nonprofit group that provides food to those who are sick, including 370 with HIV and AIDS in the Baltimore area.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1999
OVER THE past century, the three-story buildings on Maryland Avenue in midtown Baltimore have housed private residences, a woodworking shop, a plumbing and heating supplier, and a series of antiques stores.But they will start the next century with a new use -- a "one-stop shop" for people living with HIV and AIDS."The Maryland Community Resource Center" is the formal name of the $4.2 million facility, which was created in and around five 1890s-era rowhouses in the 1700 block of Maryland Ave. at Falls Road.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1998
Moveable Feast Inc., the agency delivering meals to low-income people with HIV or AIDS, is getting busier -- and its officials see their growing clientele as a window to the wider community grappling with the disease.They note that people are living longer with the disease, women infected with the virus are turning up in increasing numbers, drug abuse is overwhelmingly the source of the epidemic, and their clients are largely African-American."The AIDS/HIV epidemic has not subsided, although a lot of people think it has," said Moveable Feast's board president, bond analyst Eric Misenheimer.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | May 2, 2006
Hardship seems to follow Shelton Jackson like a wanton stray dog. He spent a lot of time during his childhood waiting in a park with his brother while his parents bought drugs, he says. His father died of AIDS-related pneumonia, and his mother, who is still a drug user, is HIV-positive. In high school, when he told his family he was gay, they stopped speaking to him. He fell in love at a tender age only to lose his partner to AIDS six years later. He is HIV-positive. He is 28. But there's another story, too. Jackson, an on-again, off-again student at Morgan State University, is funny and excitable.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | June 15, 1993
Carroll County Rainbow of Hope, a support group for people living with problems generated by the AIDS crisis, will act as a resource for HIV and AIDS patients at a new office opening tomorrow in Westminster.Earlier this year, when Paulette Fernekees helped start the group for those "affected by and infected with HIV and AIDS," she said she envisioned a place where county patients and their families could go for help."We can access information quickly from different doctors and organizations," said Ms. Fernekees.
NEWS
June 12, 2001
The League for People with Disabilities Inc. recently received a $3.25 million unrestricted bequest from the late Sarah H. Sayler in memory of her deceased husband, Monroe H. Schoss. At the time of her death, Sayler, a Baltimore resident, had been a supporter of the league for more than 50 years. "It's always an honor to be remembered in such a way by a donor," Janice Frey-Angel, chief executive officer of the league, said in a news release. The League for People with Disabilities was founded in Baltimore in 1927 and provides programs in cognitive retraining, job skills training, adult literacy, residential camping and medical day care for people with traumatic head injury and people with HIV and AIDS.
HEALTH
December 17, 2009
The Baltimore County Health Department has received an additional $160,930 in federal funding to provide more rental assistance to people with AIDS, bringing the total appropriation through 2010 to nearly $2 million. The program offers transportation, education, employment services and counseling to low-income residents coping with HIV and AIDS. The additional funds will mean at least eight more housing vouchers for a total of 100 in 2010, in addition to other support services. No county matching funds are required.
HEALTH
December 17, 2009
The Baltimore County Health Department has received an additional $160,930 in federal funding to provide more rental assistance to people with AIDS, bringing the total appropriation through 2010 to nearly $2 million. The program offers transportation, education, employment services and counseling to low-income residents coping with HIV and AIDS. The additional funds will mean at least eight more housing vouchers for a total of 100 in 2010, in addition to other support services. No county matching funds are required.
NEWS
By Angela J. Bass and Angela J. Bass,angela.bass@baltsun.com | July 22, 2009
Saying they have been too silent for too long in the fight against HIV and AIDS, leaders of several Baltimore faith-based groups converted nearly a dozen churches Tuesday into places where people could be tested for the virus without fear of being stigmatized. The JACQUES Initiative - a program at the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine - launched Project SHALEM in partnership with the Maryland AIDS Administration and several local faith-based and community organizations.
NEWS
By Kevin Fenton | May 27, 2009
Nearly 30 years after the discovery of HIV and AIDS, the epidemic is still ravaging black neighborhoods in Baltimore and across the nation. Unfortunately, complacency about HIV and the continued stigma associated with the disease are hindering progress by preventing too many African-Americans from seeking either HIV testing and treatment or support from their friends and family. But this is a challenge that can be overcome. At a White House event last month, the Obama administration took an important step in confronting the United States' HIV epidemic, which threatens the health of African-Americans more than any other racial or ethnic group.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | May 18, 2009
It was November 1994 when Carolyn Massey suffered a horrible cold that brought her to a doctor. She was shocked to learn that she had been infected with HIV, the same virus that had led to her 35-year-old brother's death a year earlier. As the 52-year-old mother of two sat recently at the kitchen table of her Laurel home, she described the pain and frustration after learning that she had contracted the virus from the man she had been in relationship with for a decade. "I was in denial and angry and ignorant for about a year," she said.
NEWS
By Ken Hackett | December 1, 2008
In remote villages throughout Africa, most people appear far removed from the financial crisis rolling through much of the world. The economy these villagers encounter is unconcerned with complex financial instruments and liquidity on Wall Street. But millions of these men, women and children will suffer the consequences of this crisis unless the new administration and Congress refuse to let the poorest of the poor suffer due to the mistakes of the richest of the rich. Many expect an Obama administration to be very friendly toward Africa; it is not every day that the United States gets a president with a Kenyan father and a Swahili name.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 12, 2008
"Ladies," said Cookie Johnson, looking straight into the camera, her husband's arm draped across her shoulders. "Have you been tested ... " " ... for HIV?" finished Los Angeles Lakers basketball legend Earvin "Magic" Johnson. As the most prominent African-American face of HIV, Johnson, who is now a businessman and philanthropist, has long used his fame to raise public awareness of the virus that causes AIDS. But the appearance of his usually camera-shy wife in the public-service announcements that began airing in July on cable TV and YouTube is a sign of a growing outspokenness among African-Americans about the community's disproportionately high HIV rates.
NEWS
By Kevin Fenton | May 27, 2009
Nearly 30 years after the discovery of HIV and AIDS, the epidemic is still ravaging black neighborhoods in Baltimore and across the nation. Unfortunately, complacency about HIV and the continued stigma associated with the disease are hindering progress by preventing too many African-Americans from seeking either HIV testing and treatment or support from their friends and family. But this is a challenge that can be overcome. At a White House event last month, the Obama administration took an important step in confronting the United States' HIV epidemic, which threatens the health of African-Americans more than any other racial or ethnic group.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 12, 2008
"Ladies," said Cookie Johnson, looking straight into the camera, her husband's arm draped across her shoulders. "Have you been tested ... " " ... for HIV?" finished Los Angeles Lakers basketball legend Earvin "Magic" Johnson. As the most prominent African-American face of HIV, Johnson, who is now a businessman and philanthropist, has long used his fame to raise public awareness of the virus that causes AIDS. But the appearance of his usually camera-shy wife in the public-service announcements that began airing in July on cable TV and YouTube is a sign of a growing outspokenness among African-Americans about the community's disproportionately high HIV rates.
NEWS
October 8, 2008
Sir Isaac Newton, the pioneer of modern physics, once said he was able to achieve what he had because he stood on the shoulders of giants. In science, as in sports, great things often are accomplished through the collective effort of many individuals. The discovery in 1983 of the human immunodeficiency virus that causes AIDS was such an achievement, and this week two French researchers, Dr. Luc Montagnier and Dr.
NEWS
By San Francisco Chronicle | July 30, 2008
SAN FRANCISCO - The United States is at the forefront of a global response to HIV and AIDS but lacks a sense of urgency when it comes to the crisis facing African-Americans, according to a report released yesterday by the Black AIDS Institute. The report, "Left Behind! Black America: A Neglected Priority in the Global AIDS Epidemic," says that the number of African-Americans infected with HIV exceeds the number of people with the virus in seven of the 15 countries served by the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief.
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