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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 2, 2012
A drug commonly used by patients with HIV may be damaging nerve cells and causing memory loss, Johns Hopkins researchers have found. Doctors have long thought the brain damage and memory loss longterm survivors of HIV suffer was caused by the disease. Johns Hopkins scientists now believe a large cause is the anti-retroviral drug efavirenz, which attacks and damages brain cells. Efavirenz is one of the drugs patients with HIV use to suppress the disease. The researchers believe a minor change in the drug's structure may be able to block its toxic effects and still allow it to suppress the virus.  Norman J. Haughey, Ph.D., lead researcher and an associate professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine , said in a release that the research is further evidence of the health problems drugs to treat HIV can cause.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
The American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland has filed a federal employment discrimination complaint against a Maryland hair salon on behalf of an employee who says he was fired for being HIV-positive. Representatives for Ratner Cos., which owns the Hair Cuttery in Greenbelt, said in a statement he was fired for "repeated inappropriate behavior," including verbally abusing co-workers in front of clients. A company document outlining his HIV status as the cause for his termination — which the ACLU included in the complaint to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission — "inaccurately described the reason for his dismissal," they said.
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NEWS
March 13, 2012
I was amazed and appalled that nowhere in your article on the rise in HIV infection among African-American women do you mention the need to use condoms to prevent the spread of the disease ("Black women in city infected with HIV at higher rate than national average," March 8). The idea that women should ensure their partners have been tested is good, but between the time of the test and intercourse, the individual could have been exposed. The idea of being "particular" about the type of man you date is nice but not safe.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention wants the American public to understand that HIV-positive people who receive treatment live longer and healthier lives compared to those who don't receive treatment, and has launched a new nationwide campaign to get the word out. The "HIV Treatment Works" campaign, announced Wednesday, is the CDC's "first communication campaign focused exclusively on encouraging treatment and care for people living with...
FEATURES
By Hartford Courant | October 25, 1998
HIV Plus is a new consumer's guide to HIV treatment and research. Produced by Out Publishing, HIV Plus is different from other magazines on the subject, says Out president Henry E. Scott."
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
Maryland will get $12.5 million from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to fund HIV prevention activities in the counties this year, down about $604,000 from last year, according to state health officials. The money comes from a $339 million pot of money doled out to states and a small number of cities according to their disease burden. And while Maryland's HIV caseload remains high, the grant dropped some because a share of the money was peeled off so the CDC could offer additional grants for innovative projects, which will be awarded in March.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 6, 2012
Some leading AIDS experts have issued the first guidelines aimed exclusively at getting those newly diagnosed with HIV into treatment and keeping them in it. Thirty one international experts, including three Johns Hopkins faculty members, used 325 studies involving tens of thousands of people infected with HIV to develop the guidelines for the International Association of Physician in AIDS Care .  HIV, which infects about 50,000...
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | October 8, 2010
Et cetera Report: Another lawsuit alleges Alomar has HIV Roberto Alomar 's wife has accused the former baseball star in divorce papers of having unprotected sex with her despite knowing that he is HIV-positive. The New York Post reported Thursday that Maria Del Pilar Rivera Alomar filed paperwork in Florida alleging the former Orioles second baseman "knew prior to his first sexual contact with [her] that he was HIV-positive. " The lawsuit is the second in two years to accuse Alomar of having unprotected sex while knowing he carried the virus.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2005
Mexican HIV center getting Md. help Maryland's Institute of Human Virology has agreed to help a Mexican university create an institute for the study and treatment of HIV/AIDS. The new center will be a division of the Universidad Autonoma of Nuevo Leon in Monterrey, Mexico. Part of a larger medical science building to be completed in 2006, it will carry the name IHV Mexico but will be independent of the Baltimore facility. Officials with the Mexican university signed a memorandum of understanding in Monterrey yesterday with Dr. Robert Gallo, director of the IHV, and Dr. Jennie Hunter-Cevera, president of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute.
NEWS
February 20, 2006
By the time someone tests positive for HIV at a Baltimore health clinic today, he or she may well have passed on the deadly AIDS virus any number of times. More people in Baltimore are now living with HIV or the disease caused by it than a decade ago. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ranked the city fifth in new cases of AIDS, according to 2003 statistics, the most recent available. To stem that steady incline, city public health officials are pursuing a new way to identify the latest infections.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 3, 2014
His family doesn't know if Zack actually heard any of it firsthand. Maybe he was at that City Council meeting (some people swear he was) or maybe not. Either way, they figure he probably knew about the things that were said, how his neighbors in the small town of Norman, Okla., paraded to the microphone that evening in 2010 to denounce the proclamation of GLBT -- Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender -- History Month. They warned of a "slippery slope" to hate-crime laws, said gay people were out to "recruit" children, claimed 78 percent of all gay people have -- and die from -- sexually transmitted diseases.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
At the end of 2012, there were 29,477 people in Maryland diagnosed and living with HIV or AIDS. Of those, 1,424 -- or just shy of 5 percent -- were between the ages of 13 and 24, according to the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. In an effort to raise awareness of those statistics, the department's Prevention and Health Promotion Administration has teamed up with other advocacy organizations to host a "Youth Sexual Health - HIV Prevention Summit" next week.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
In the early days of the AIDS epidemic, when nobody knew what HIV was or how it was spread, few people in Baltimore were willing to go out of their way to help those dying of the disease. Tom Patrick was one of the willing -- still is, in fact -- and will be honored for that commitment this weekend, as grand marshal of the Baltimore Pride parade. "It's going to be a hoot," said Patrick, 65, who for the last 24 years has worked to deliver free meals and other services to the sick and dying of Baltimore with the nonprofit Moveable Feast . The group is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, and Patrick -- its longtime volunteer manager -- is about to retire, said Ted Blankenship, the group's development director.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
HBO's "The Normal Heart" will do something to you that TV rarely does: rock you to your emotional roots. The power of this HBO movie starring Mark Ruffalo, Julia Roberts and Jim Parsons is such that you can forget about turning off the TV after the final credits roll and going to bed as you might with most made-for-TV movies. This one, adapted by Larry Kramer from his Tony Award-winning 1985 play, will keep you up for hours in an emotional churn thinking about life, love, loss, death and politics.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
A few years ago, Richard Larison was leading efforts for Johns Hopkins Medicine International to expand health care access at a local hospital in Panama City, Panama, when a thought popped into his head. "You know, there are still people in my own country that still don't have access to good health care," Larison remembered thinking. Fast-forward to July 2012, when Larison stepped into a new role as CEO of Chase Brexton Health Care, a Baltimore-based nonprofit clinic embarking on an ambitious expansion in multiple suburban locations and a newly renovated headquarters in Mount Vernon.
NEWS
By Robert Gallo | April 20, 2014
Wednesday is the 30-year anniversary of the day my colleagues and I reported that a new retrovirus, now known as HIV, was the agent causing AIDS. We also announced the development of an effective HIV blood test and the capacity to continuously produce the virus so that drugs could be tested. Since then, basic science has driven a better understanding of how HIV infects humans, resulting in the development of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). Last summer the National AIDS Treatment Advocacy Project reported that "a 20-year-old HIV-positive individual on ART in the U.S. or Canada is expected to live into their early 70s, a life expectancy approaching that in the general population.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | July 12, 1995
Allowing testimony about a Carroll County man's HIV-positive status during his child sex abuse trial could prejudice jurors against him, defense attorneys argued during a motions hearing yesterday in Circuit Court.In addition, lengthy medical testimony about the human immunodeficiency virus and how it causes AIDS could detract from telling what happened to a 3-year-old county boy, county public defender Barbara Kreinar told Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. yesterday."If we leave that in, it is not a trial focusing on [the boy's]
HEALTH
Dan Rodricks | January 4, 2014
It has been 30 years since Dr. Robert Gallo became internationally famous for his role in the discovery of the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome. He has wrestled with the question of a cure countless times since then. But only within the last year, he says, did he conclude that working toward a "functional cure" makes the most sense. AIDS has killed more than 36 million people around the world since the early 1980s. A similar number of people are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus that Gallo and French scientists co-discovered.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Local medical professionals will gather with members of Baltimore's gay community later this month to discuss a new medical treatment that involves HIV-negative patients taking a daily pill to avoid becoming infected. The April 28 forum, hosted by the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore, will cover the use of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, or PrEP, which "has been shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection among adult men and women at very high risk for HIV infection through sex or injecting drug use," according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Magic Johnson may have survived for more than 20 years with HIV and is in apparent good health, but don't let the basketball legend's success story fool you. HIV and AIDS remain scourges in the African-American community, where experts say infection rates are higher than in any other demographic group — and rising fast. On Thursday, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People kicked off a campaign to enlist local pastors and ministers in spreading the word that the HIV-AIDs crisis in their communities is more severe than many realize, and that plenty can be done to help.
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