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By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2001
Pietr Hitzig, the once-famous Internet diet doctor and self-proclaimed "father of fen-phen," was convicted yesterday on 34 counts of illegally prescribing medicine, in many cases to patients he never met or examined. A federal jury in Baltimore deliberated almost 20 hours over three days before convicting the former Timonium doctor on all charges brought against him in 1999. Hitzig, 58, showed no emotion as the verdict was read. His attorneys said they would file an appeal. Authorities said Hitzig was seeking fame and fortune when he prescribed the fen-phen drug therapy to thousands of patients across the country in the mid-1990s.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2001
Pietr Hitzig, who sought fame prescribing the drug fen-phen over the Internet, was sentenced yesterday in federal court in Baltimore to 45 months in prison after a hearing that focused on his ego-driven style and the toll exacted by his experimental approach to medicine. Hitzig, 60, showed no emotion as U.S. District Court Judge J. Frederick Motz pronounced sentence, but broke down and cried moments later when a deputy marshal led him out of the nearly empty courtroom in handcuffs. "I can't tell you how much I hate this," Hitzig told his lawyers.
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NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1997
A Timonium doctor whose office was raided by federal agents investigating his use of the Internet in prescribing fen-phen to patients he had never met has filed for bankruptcy protection, saying the raid has nearly crippled his business.But Pietr Hitzig, who once called himself "the father of fen-phen therapy," said yesterday that he hopes to continue practicing "telemedicine" not only here but in other states."I'm still a player. The last hasn't been heard from me," said Hitzig, whose offices were raided Sept.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2001
In their case against Internet diet doctor Pietr Hitzig, federal prosecutors focused on fen-phen, the drug combination that the former Timonium doctor claimed could treat everything from obesity to drug addiction. But as the case heads to appeal after Hitzig's conviction Monday on 34 counts of illegally dispensing medicine, it could turn on two seemingly incidental charges involving the prescription painkillers Dilaudid and Percocet. Those two drugs are more strictly regulated than fenfluramine and phentermine, the "fen-phen" drugs which made up the remaining 32 charges.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Michael James and Jay Apperson and Michael James,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1998
Pietr Hitzig, Baltimore's internationally known Internet diet doctor, has been suspended from practicing medicine under an emergency order describing him as an "imminent danger" to public safety.Hitzig's license was suspended Wednesday night by Maryland's Board of Physician Quality Assurance, which charged last week that the doctor had sex with patients, handed out medicine indiscriminately and otherwise flouted standards of medical care.His attorneys were working yesterday to comply with an order that he surrender his licensing documents, his prescription forms and any controlled drugs in his possession.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1999
Pietr Hitzig, Baltimore's once-famous Internet diet doctor whose practice came crashing down amid claims of malpractice and sexual misconduct, was indicted yesterday on 34 counts of illegally prescribing medicine.Federal agents arrested Hitzig early yesterday at his mother's home in Lewisburg, W.Va., where the Harvard-educated physician had been visiting. He remained jailed last night.Though his World Wide Web site still advertises his drug treatments with the banner "Better than Ever," authorities said it is unclear if Hitzig continues to practice medicine.
NEWS
By Michael James and Joan Jacobson and Michael James and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1998
Dr. Pietr Hitzig -- Baltimore's internationally known Internet diet doctor -- was accused yesterday of having sex with patients, handing out pills indiscriminately, and flouting standards of medical conduct during social flings with those he treated.Maryland's physician board, which brought the claims and has ordered Hitzig to a February hearing, describe the Harvard-educated doctor's conduct as among the worst it has ever investigated. One patient died under his care from "drug intoxication" and another committed suicide in the driveway of his home, the board said in a 60-page report.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1997
A Timonium doctor whose office was raided by federal agents investigating his use of cyberspace in prescribing fen-phen to people he never met says he is tired of "being treated like a Colombia drug lord" and may move his practice out of the Baltimore area."
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2001
Pietr Hitzig, who sought fame prescribing the drug fen-phen over the Internet, was sentenced yesterday in federal court in Baltimore to 45 months in prison after a hearing that focused on his ego-driven style and the toll exacted by his experimental approach to medicine. Hitzig, 60, showed no emotion as U.S. District Court Judge J. Frederick Motz pronounced sentence, but broke down and cried moments later when a deputy marshal led him out of the nearly empty courtroom in handcuffs. "I can't tell you how much I hate this," Hitzig told his lawyers.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1999
Pietr Hitzig, Baltimore's Internet diet doctor, has surrendered his license to practice medicine to state authorities, agreeing never to seek reinstatement in Maryland and admitting that he engaged in sexual misconduct with patients.Hitzig's license was accepted yesterday by Maryland's Board of Physician Quality Assurance, which described the Harvard-educated doctor's conduct as among the worst it had investigated.Maryland's physician board, which brought the claims against Hitzig, suspended his license Dec. 16 and had scheduled a seven-day hearing this month to decide whether to revoke it. Hitzig is under federal investigation of allegations he practiced medicine through the Internet.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2001
Pietr Hitzig, the once-famous Internet diet doctor and self-proclaimed "father of fen-phen," was convicted yesterday on 34 counts of illegally prescribing medicine, in many cases to patients he never met or examined. A federal jury in Baltimore deliberated almost 20 hours over three days before convicting the former Timonium doctor on all charges brought against him in 1999. Hitzig, 58, showed no emotion as the verdict was read. His attorneys said they would file an appeal. Authorities said Hitzig was seeking fame and fortune when he prescribed the fen-phen drug therapy to thousands of patients across the country in the mid-1990s.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
Pietr Hitzig was chasing fame and ignoring patients' needs when he cavalierly prescribed the now-banned fen-phen drug therapy as a treatment for everything from depression to drug addiction, federal prosecutors said yesterday. Closing the five-week trial of the former Timonium doctor, prosecutors described Hitzig as a "pill pusher" and asked a federal jury to find him guilty on 34 counts of illegally prescribing medicine to patients around the country, many whom he never met or examined.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2001
A former Timonium doctor who once called himself the "father of fen-phen" continued yesterday to promote the drug combination's benefits, even as he defended himself against federal charges of illegally prescribing the medicine. Testifying during his 3-week-old trial in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Pietr Hitzig said the results were "extremely remarkable" for the 5,000 to 7,000 patients across the country who followed his fen-phen protocol for everything from weight loss to depression to alcohol and drug addiction.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2001
Pietr Hitzig once called himself "the father of fen-phen" and was known nationally as a vocal proponent of the drug therapy that he claimed could not only help people lose weight but also cure other ills, ranging from drug addiction to gulf war syndrome. The Timonium doctor drew attention for one other claim, as well. Hitzig said he didn't need to see patients in person or administer physical exams before prescribing drugs, and he set up a booming online business that he described as a progressive "telemedicine" practice but that federal authorities said put patients at risk.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1999
Pietr Hitzig, Baltimore's once-famous Internet diet doctor whose practice came crashing down amid claims of malpractice and sexual misconduct, was indicted yesterday on 34 counts of illegally prescribing medicine.Federal agents arrested Hitzig early yesterday at his mother's home in Lewisburg, W.Va., where the Harvard-educated physician had been visiting. He remained jailed last night.Though his World Wide Web site still advertises his drug treatments with the banner "Better than Ever," authorities said it is unclear if Hitzig continues to practice medicine.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1999
Pietr Hitzig, Baltimore's Internet diet doctor, has surrendered his license to practice medicine to state authorities, agreeing never to seek reinstatement in Maryland and admitting that he engaged in sexual misconduct with patients.Hitzig's license was accepted yesterday by Maryland's Board of Physician Quality Assurance, which described the Harvard-educated doctor's conduct as among the worst it had investigated.Maryland's physician board, which brought the claims against Hitzig, suspended his license Dec. 16 and had scheduled a seven-day hearing this month to decide whether to revoke it. Hitzig is under federal investigation of allegations he practiced medicine through the Internet.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
Pietr Hitzig was chasing fame and ignoring patients' needs when he cavalierly prescribed the now-banned fen-phen drug therapy as a treatment for everything from depression to drug addiction, federal prosecutors said yesterday. Closing the five-week trial of the former Timonium doctor, prosecutors described Hitzig as a "pill pusher" and asked a federal jury to find him guilty on 34 counts of illegally prescribing medicine to patients around the country, many whom he never met or examined.
FEATURES
September 18, 1997
Dr. Pietr Hitzig adjusts his headphones as he readies for a radio interview. It's been one day since major drug companies pulled their diet pills off the market, citing patients who (x experienced heart damage, and Hitzig's Timonium office is on full alert.On his desk is the Food and Drug Administration press release warning of the dangers associated with "fen-phen," the popular diet-pill combination he was instrumental in popularizing. On the phone is a national radio audience eager for his view on what to do next.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Michael James and Jay Apperson and Michael James,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1998
Pietr Hitzig, Baltimore's internationally known Internet diet doctor, has been suspended from practicing medicine under an emergency order describing him as an "imminent danger" to public safety.Hitzig's license was suspended Wednesday night by Maryland's Board of Physician Quality Assurance, which charged last week that the doctor had sex with patients, handed out medicine indiscriminately and otherwise flouted standards of medical care.His attorneys were working yesterday to comply with an order that he surrender his licensing documents, his prescription forms and any controlled drugs in his possession.
NEWS
By Michael James and Joan Jacobson and Michael James and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1998
Dr. Pietr Hitzig -- Baltimore's internationally known Internet diet doctor -- was accused yesterday of having sex with patients, handing out pills indiscriminately, and flouting standards of medical conduct during social flings with those he treated.Maryland's physician board, which brought the claims and has ordered Hitzig to a February hearing, describe the Harvard-educated doctor's conduct as among the worst it has ever investigated. One patient died under his care from "drug intoxication" and another committed suicide in the driveway of his home, the board said in a 60-page report.
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