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By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | December 12, 1991
Giovanni Rivieri "stalked" his ex-girlfriend and her current lover for more than a year before trying to hire a hit man to kill the man and assault the woman, a Harford County prosecutor has said."
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
A White Marsh woman will spend the rest of her life in prison for hiring a hit man to kill her husband — a man she has insisted subjected her to years of abuse. A judge handed down the sentence Monday after jurors rejected Karla Porter's claim of self-defense and convicted her in August of first-degree murder. Prosecutors have disputed the allegations of abuse by William "Ray" Porter, arguing that she concocted them to justify a cold-blooded murder. "The evidence at the trial was very clear.
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NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1998
Ruthann Aron hopped from pay phone to pay phone during the weekend before her arrest, negotiating a deal with a supposed contract killer. The tapes played at her retrial yesterday also showed she worried that her plan to have her husband and another man killed would be found out.It was 11: 10 a.m. on June 7, 1997, when Aron, a prominent developer, and the "hit man," undercover Detective Terry Ryan, first spoke. She was talking from a coin phone in the entry of a Sears store at White Oak shopping center.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
At a recent news conference, Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts pledged that his department would responsibly use the controversial tactic known until recently as "stop and frisk. " As an example to the public and his officers, he described making such a stop himself. But experts say Batts' example — he said at the time that he searched somebody based on a tip that the person was a hit man for the Black Guerrilla Family gang — may not meet the standards for such stops.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 19, 1997
Ah, that ever nettlesome First Amendment, what with its stipulation that forbids the government from making any law that prohibits free speech. Just what are the limits of free speech, anyway?The debate will rage on virtually forever. Judges can't even agree. A gaggle of idiots in Boulder, Colo., known as Paladin Press published a book called "Hit Man: A Technical Manual for Independent Contractors." The book is what it says: a treatise on how to efficiently commit homicide.One Lawrence T. Horn then hired one James E. Perry to murder Horn's ex-wife, his 8-year-old quadriplegic son and the boy's nurse.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan | October 28, 2006
A federal judge yesterday sentenced Solothal "Itchy Man" Thomas, the West Baltimore hit man who was often accused but rarely convicted in state courts, to life in prison plus 10 years. Judge Catherine C. Blake was legally required to impose the life sentence after Thomas was convicted over the summer after a jury trial. Thomas' co-defendant, 30-year-old Edward Countess, received the same sentence. Thomas, 30, had been charged with killing two people and attempting to kill a dozen more as part of his work as an "enforcer" for a large drug organization.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | September 7, 2008
The Internet Crime Complaint Center issued another warning about the hit man e-mail scheme that first surfaced a couple years ago and, more recently, earlier this year. The center said it continues to receive thousands of reports on the hit man e-mail, but it warns that the content has evolved since late 2006. The two new versions of the scheme started appearing in July. One e-mail instructed recipients to contact a designated telephone number, and the other e-mail claimed the recipient or a "loved one" would be kidnapped unless a ransom was paid.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | June 8, 1993
A former Marine -- desperate to beat rape charges -- offered a police officer posing as a hit man $3,000 to murder two potential witnesses, prosecutors say.But the man's lawyer argues that his client was "enticed" by a police informant interested in relaxing his own pending criminal charges.Those were the two arguments heard by a Howard Circuit Court jury yesterday in the trial of James Alexander Page Jr., a 27-year-old Greenbelt man charged with two counts each of solicitation to commit murder and obstruction of justice.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | June 9, 1993
A former Marine told police he was depressed at the prospect of spending his life in prison when he approached a man he thought was a hired killer about slaying two potential witnesses.Prosecutors played the tape of a police confession to accompany the testimony of Cpl. Lee Lachman before a Howard Circuit Court jury in the trial of James Alexander Page Jr., 27, of Greenbelt.Page, whose Marine enlistment expired while awaiting trial, is charged with two counts each of solicitation to commit murder and obstruction of justice.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1998
A Columbia man was convicted yesterday of trying to resolve a heated divorce and custody battle by hiring a hit man in an attempt to kill his wife.Mark Cordero, 43, wearing a suit and leg irons in Howard County Circuit Court, admits to the crime, his attorney said, but pleaded not guilty because of technical flaws in the case.Cordero, a former computer engineer for International Business Machines Corp., was found guilty by Judge Raymond J. Kane Jr.Prosecutors said Cordero could face up to life in prison when he is sentenced March 31, although state guidelines recommend a sentence of four to nine years for solicitation of murder.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
A Baltimore County jury on Tuesday rejected a White Marsh woman's claim that the only way to end years of spousal abuse was to hire a hit man to kill her husband. The jury, composed of nine women and three men, convicted Karla Porter of first-degree murder in a case that tested the scope of self-defense arguments. The 51-year-old defendant stood stoically in a dark pant suit with her long red hair tightly braided as the jury foreman read the verdict, which could send her to prison for the rest of her life without the possibility of parole.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Jurors are expected to begin deliberating Monday whether Karla Porter is guilty of premeditated murder for hiring a man to kill her husband, or of a lesser charge because she was acting in self-defense. Porter, 51, is charged with first-degree murder in the death of her husband of 24 years, William "Ray" Porter. He was shot to death March 1, 2010, at the Towson gas station he owned after prosecutors said his wife offered to pay an Essex man $9,000. The hit man, William Bishop, was previously convicted in the murder and is serving a life sentence.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
An Annapolis man is facing attempted murder charges in a murder-for-hire scheme in Leesburg, Va. Wendell B. Mansel, 54, was arrested Aug. 3 during a meeting with a Leesburg undercover police officer, who was posing as a hit man. In what was their final meeting, Mansel told the officer he wished to have his wife killed and offered him a partial payment to carry out the hit, police said. He is charged with attempted capital murder, murder-for-hire and soliciting murder-for-hire.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
A Baltimore pastor who paid a hit man $50,000 in church funds to kill someone for life insurance payouts bought similar indemnity policies on his boyfriend when the pair were fighting, along with contracts on the man's mother and daughter, he testified Friday in city Circuit Court. He canceled them after time, however, "because we were getting along," he said. The admission was one of many confessions Kevin Pushia offered from the witness stand during the trial of his alleged accomplices, brothers James "Omar" Clea and Kareem Clea.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2011
A kindergarten teacher's eyes grow wide as she surveys the audience filling up the bar. An aspiring country singer moves his lips as he silently reviews the lyrics to "Desperado" in his head. A sailor in a leather jacket high-fives strangers as he tries out a few dance moves he'll try onstage. "You'd better listen when I get up there, because it's going to rock ," says J.C. Rucker, a Navy ensign from Fort Meade. He was one of 11 aspiring pop stars preparing to step onstage Tuesday night at the Whiskey to audition for "Annapolis Idol," a talent contest that has raised tens of thousands of dollars for charity, boosted a music career or two, and grown more popular every year since debuting in 2008.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
A gang leader who ordered a hit on a member of his own gang whom he suspected of being gay was sentenced Tuesday to life in prison without parole. Timothy E. Rawlings Jr., 24, a former quarterback at Parkville High School and the father of a 3-year-old boy, showed no emotion as Baltimore County Circuit Judge Robert N. Dugan told him that the killing of Steven Parrish, for the sole reason that the victim showed signs of being homosexual, was "senseless, brutal, unprovoked, cold-blooded, premeditated murder.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1996
The argument soon to be under way in a Maryland courtroom: Can a book publisher be an accomplice to murder for printing a "how-to" murder manual?Such a book, titled "Hit Man: A technical manual for independent contractors," may be on trial in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt because a hired killer named James Perry supposedly used it as a step-by-step guide to carry out a notorious triple murder in Maryland."
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1998
Mark Cordero was convicted yesterday of trying to resolve a heated divorce and custody battle by hiring a hit man in an attempt to kill his wife.The former IBM computer engineer, 43, wearing a suit and leg irons in Howard County Circuit Court, admits to the crime, his attorney said, but pleaded not guilty because of technical flaws in the case.Cordero was found guilty by Judge Raymond J. Kane Jr.Prosecutors said Cordero, a Columbia resident, could face up to life in prison when he is sentenced March 31, although state guidelines recommend four to nine years for solicitation of murder.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Kate Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2010
A 34-year-old Baltimore pastor who worked with the developmentally disabled pleaded guilty Friday to his role in a conspiracy to kill a blind man in hopes of collecting $1.4 million in life insurance. Kevin Pushia faces life in prison in the death of Lemuel Wallace, who was found shot in the head in a Leakin Park bathroom in February 2009. Prosecutor Robin Wherley said Pushia confessed to taking out multiple life insurance policies in Wallace's name, then paying a hit man $50,000 to kill him. That money came from the treasury of a small East Baltimore church where Pushia was a pastor.
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