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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
Perra S. Bell, a former Towson University history teacher who was a lifelong crusader for civil rights, died Sept. 26 at Physicians Regional Medical Center in Naples, Fla., of complications from a fractured hip. The former Baltimore resident was 95. "She was such a character and had such influence promoting racial equality in so many ways, but not in a flamboyant way," said her daughter, Jane Bell Kiester of Marco Island, Fla. "She was feisty and...
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
Perra S. Bell, a former Towson University history teacher who was a lifelong crusader for civil rights, died Sept. 26 at Physicians Regional Medical Center in Naples, Fla., of complications from a fractured hip. The former Baltimore resident was 95. "She was such a character and had such influence promoting racial equality in so many ways, but not in a flamboyant way," said her daughter, Jane Bell Kiester of Marco Island, Fla. "She was feisty and...
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 3, 2010
Charles O' Donovan Evans, a retired history teacher and archivist at Mount de Sales Academy, died of lung cancer Nov. 27 at a friend's home in Sparks. He was 80. Born in Baltimore and raised on Longwood Road in Roland Park, he was the son of the commander of the 29th Division, Maryland National Guard, Henry Cotheal Evans, who fought in both World Wars I and II, and the former Eleanor O'Donovan. He was a 1949 Loyola High School graduate and played for the school's football team, a squad invited to play in the New Year's Day contest at the Sugar Bowl in New Orleans.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
J. George Kropp, an educator whose career at Calvert Hall College High School teaching social studies and history spanned more than 50 years, died Sunday of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Loch Raven Village resident was 76. "I call him a legend and an icon. If you knew him, he was always student-centered. He always put the kids first," said Chuck Stembler, principal of Calvert Hall. "He also had a genuine love of his subject and all things history, and he loved the intellectual rigors of history.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | October 22, 2005
Harold Greenwald, a former longtime history teacher at City College and avid theater buff, died of coronary artery disease Thursday at his Pikesville home. He was 94. Despite years of debilitating health problems, Mr. Greenwald remained active and fully engaged in the "business of life" until the last couple of months. "Dad really lived Dylan Thomas' advice in his poem `Do not go gentle into that good night,'" said a daughter, Judy Mehlman of Pikesville. "We are convinced that it was Dad's unquenchable passion for life that kept him going these past few years despite many health crises.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2004
Frederick A. Johnson, who shared his penchant for history and world events with students during a 30-year teaching career in Baltimore County public schools, died of cancer Monday at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 72 and lived in Randallstown. Mr. Johnson was born and raised in Greenville, N.C., and earned a bachelor's degree in history in 1954 from what was then Morgan State College. In 1961, he earned a master's degree in secondary education from Pennsylvania State University in State College.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | March 11, 2006
David J. Carey, a retired teacher whose enthusiasm illuminating historical events and the personalities behind them earned him accolades and admiration from students and faculty during his years at Pikesville High School, died of lung cancer Tuesday at Sinai Hospital. The Reisterstown resident was 70. Mr. Carey was born and raised in Marion, Iowa, and after graduating from high school in 1953, he earned a bachelor's degree with honors in journalism from the University of Iowa in Iowa City in 1957.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2002
Frederick Leist Jr., a retired St. Paul's School for Boys faculty member and Navy lieutenant commander, died of complications from a stroke Tuesday at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center & Hospital. The Roland Park resident was 76. Mr. Leist taught history at the Brooklandville school for 20 years and often infused his lectures with personal observations of world affairs. Born in Baltimore and raised in Stoneleigh, he was long fascinated by history. As a boy, he frequently visited the Confederate Soldiers Home in Pikesville and listened to aged Civil War veterans tell their stories.
NEWS
May 18, 2007
Ruth Dillon Brock, a retired history teacher, died of congestive heart failure Friday at the Broadmead Retirement Community in Cockeysville. The former Village of Cross Keys resident was 83. Born Ruth Dillon in Atlanta, she earned a bachelor of arts degree at the University of Georgia and wrote a column on life amid the war effort for the Atlanta Constitution in the 1940s. She married Pope Furman Brock in 1948 and moved to Baltimore, where she raised their three children and for 20 years taught European and Russian history at Roland Park Country School.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2010
Theodore A. Heun, a retired Baltimore County high school history teacher who was a witness to the shootings of students at Kent State University in 1970, died June 5 of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease, at his Ellicott City home. He was 69. Mr. Heun, the son of German immigrants, was born in Baltimore and raised in Oliver Beach. After graduating from Kenwood High School in 1959, he earned a bachelor's degree in history in 1963 from what is now Towson University.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
Kenneth Graeme Menzies, a retired Gilman School teacher and lacrosse coach, died of complications from an infection Sept. 1 at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The Stevensville resident was 84. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of John T. Menzies, the London-born president of Crosse & Blackwell, a food processing firm that once made orange marmalade and other products at its Baltimore plant. His mother was Hilda May Ranson, a homemaker. They family lived at Braeside off Broadway Road in Baltimore County.
SPORTS
By Jordan Littman, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
On the cricket field at the South Germantown Recreational Park on Sunday afternoon, Jamie Harrison saw his dream come true. Dozens of parents and fans gathered to watch his plan of three years finally come to fruition: two teams battle for the Maryland Youth Cricket Championship, the first such event in United States history. The event saw the Germantown Kids Cricket Club win the state title over Cockeysville Kids Cricket, 25-23, after a one-month, four-team tournament. "This is something happening in front of me that I envisioned and imagined and thought that could happen," said Harrison, the founder and president of the United States Youth Cricket Association.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2013
House Speaker Michael Busch began his Career Day visit at Tyler Heights Elementary School by venturing to the front of the media center with a state flag. He explained the meaning behind its colors and patterns, then gave the assembled fourth-graders a speech about how Maryland history is woven into the American fabric; how the founding fathers fought for a democratic government that is the cornerstone of the country's coveted freedoms. Moments after wrapping up his history lesson, Busch solicited questions from the navy-and-khaki-clad uniformed pupils at the Annapolis school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
The math is daunting: More than 2,300 pages of prose winnowed down to 190, including photographs and the occasional blank sheet that signals chapter breaks. Yet, that's exactly the challenge that author and historian Taylor Branch tackled when he condensed his three-part history of the U.S. civil rights movement into one slender volume that could be taught in the nation's classrooms. Never mind that Branch, now 66, devoted more than 25 years of his life to crafting his acclaimed trilogy.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
On Wednesday night, after 18 months of construction and three years of planning, the $500 million Maryland Live Casino in Hanover was ready for prime time. Just after 10 p.m., Roxine Noone of Jessup burst through the doors of the just-opened casino at Arundel Mills mall and whooped her excitement — holding a crisp $100 bill out in front of her. "I have been waiting nine years for this," she said. Judy Sorrell of Annapolis threw her hands into the air as she came through the doors after having waited in line for more than five hours.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
Edward Standish "Brad" Bradford Jr., a career educator who had been headmaster of Boys' Latin School during the early 1980s, died Thursday from complications after surgery at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 83. The son of a businessman and a homemaker, Mr. Bradford was born and raised in Longmeadow, Mass. After graduating from Admiral Billard Academy in New London, Conn., he served in the Air Force during the Korean War. After being discharged from the service, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1956 from the University of Connecticut.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2001
The strategy was formulating in Bennie Anderson's mind. Anderson had his job as a high school history teacher in St. Louis during the summer. Now, all he needed was a way to reach his students by using a non-conventional method, something he was working on shortly before the Ravens called and invited him to training camp. "A lot of people will appreciate history more if you change the way it's taught. As long as I can change the way it is taught, then I can influence the kids," Anderson said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 9, 2011
E. Patrick Moloney, a banker turned educator who passed onto generations of Archbishop Curley High students his enthusiasm and passion for American and Maryland history, died Saturday of congestive heart failure at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The longtime Northeast Baltimore resident was 79. Mr. Moloney, the son of a Baltimore police officer and a homemaker, was born Edward Patrick Moloney in Baltimore and raised in the city's Bel Air-Edison neighborhood. "He never used his first name," said his wife of 33 years, the former Rose Dagostaro.
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