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By Jon Marcus and Jon Marcus,Contributing Writer | August 1, 1993
SENECA FALLS, N.Y.-- The newest historical site to be preserved by the National Park Service may shed less light on the past than on the present.The Women's Rights National Historical Park, most of which opened yesterday at the site of America's first women's rights convention, commemorates a movement still evolving."
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2003
Responding to a female rabbi's invitation, 55 women from their 30s to their 70s showed up at the Jewish Museum of Maryland yesterday to write stories of their lives for the museum's archives. The rabbi, Nina Beth Cardin, said yesterday's event was the first such writing exercise at the museum, and was designed to preserve pieces of women's lives and minds at the turn of this century -- pieces that might otherwise pass unnoticed. "This will give us a view of Baltimore as it hasn't been recorded before," Cardin told the group.
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FEATURES
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1998
When it comes to vivid teaching tools, Carolyn Stegman finds it hard to beat an old classic: the thick history text she was given as a junior high school student three decades ago."It has all the tragic events -- the wars and the famine and the settling of the West," said Stegman, an adjunct professor at Salisbury State University.But when Stegman reaches for the book, it's to show her students what isn't recorded in the 400 densely worded pages. Tucked in between profiles of legendary characters and heroic tales are only a few short paragraphs chronicling the contributions of American women.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | April 1, 2001
Gloria Steinem, feminist matriarch, got married last year after 40 years of avoiding what she had termed a sexist institution. Has the death knell of American feminism finally rung? The old guard like Steinem who birthed the second wave of feminism in the 1960s seemed to have tired, while younger women who'd reaped the benefits of feminism were, like many a privileged child of hard-working parents before them, decrying the very politik that had bequeathed to them a freedom no generation of women in history has ever known.
SPORTS
By Elliott Almond and Elliott Almond,Los Angeles Times | April 5, 1992
The United States is overflowing with talented women's basketball players, perhaps the world's best. But who are they?With NBA stars playing in the Olympics, USA Basketball administrators are concerned that the gifted women will be overshadowed at Barcelona, Spain. Susan Blackwood, head of the Women's Games Committee, said the organization has addressed the problem but offered no solutions.Nancy Lieberman also considered the situation. Her conclusions:"Men perpetuate men," she said. "Women don't think like that.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach | March 5, 1992
She was one of the women we third-grade girls admired the most, this career woman from Boston named Diana Prince. She had it all: In addition to being powerful, independent and beautiful, Diana was also fair-minded, incorruptible and capable of winning out over the Bad Guys.We dreamed of being like her.And the fact that she had bulletproof bracelets and a Lasso of Truth to help her along in life didn't deter us from modeling ourselves after Diana.Who, incidentally, also went by the name of Wonder Woman.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | December 9, 1991
IT WASN'T that long ago when a woman who chose to join the military had to be unmarried. If she had children, she essentially had to sign them over to a legal guardian. And thoughts of being "top gun" were pure fantasy. If she was a member of a racial minority, her opportunities were even more limited.Such revelations tax the imaginations of young people in her classes at Anne Arundel Community College, says RitaVictoria Gomez, a teacher and historian who is also a major in the Air Force reserves.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | November 29, 1992
As part of an ongoing program to expand my personal horizons, I tried on the latest fad in women's shoes: high-heeled pumps with an inch-high platform sole."
NEWS
March 1, 1993
Women's History Month will be celebrated at Western Maryland College throughout March, with a number of events focusing on issues pertaining to women.All the campus events are free.The Women's History Month "kickoff" will be from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. today in the Decker College Center Pub. Participants will receive ribbons to show solidarity and support of the monthlong celebration.An art exhibition by WMC junior Sara Lundberg will open tomorrow with a reception at 7 p.m. in Gallery One in the Hoover Library.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | March 17, 1991
Wielding everything from axes to boiling lye, American women have defended themselves and their country since Colonial days, an Air Forcemajor and history professor told a Women's Commission gathering Thursday.Ten county women active in Operation Desert Storm, honored in absentia, followed many women who served in military capacities, said Rita Gomez, who teaches at Anne Arundel Community College."The average person has the vague idea that women did not fight, and that the military was what we see in movies, with men all dressedup like John Wayne.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 21, 2000
SUNSET BEACH resident Linda Grant DePauw has a mission to the world to provide information on the role of women and the military. "From the very beginning, women have played various roles in wars, from behind-the-lines support to front-line duties," says DePauw, 60, professor emeritus of American history at George Washington University. DePauw has dedicated her professional life to supporting development of the little-known field of women's military studies. "Accurate information about women in the military has not been widely published or talked about generally," she says.
FEATURES
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1998
When it comes to vivid teaching tools, Carolyn Stegman finds it hard to beat an old classic: the thick history text she was given as a junior high school student three decades ago."It has all the tragic events -- the wars and the famine and the settling of the West," said Stegman, an adjunct professor at Salisbury State University.But when Stegman reaches for the book, it's to show her students what isn't recorded in the 400 densely worded pages. Tucked in between profiles of legendary characters and heroic tales are only a few short paragraphs chronicling the contributions of American women.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1994
You never forget your first time.Rodrick Bingham was 22, the first in his family to graduate from college. It was a soft May evening in Tennessee, the night before his graduation ceremony, and he was looking for his girlfriend, Ina. When he saw her with his best friend -- they had been driving around together, trying to find him -- his imagination took over. Then rage took over.What was he thinking, as he raised his right hand, a solidly built athlete, all of 6 feet, facing down a 5-foot-3 woman, a woman he loved?
FEATURES
By Jon Marcus and Jon Marcus,Contributing Writer | August 1, 1993
SENECA FALLS, N.Y.-- The newest historical site to be preserved by the National Park Service may shed less light on the past than on the present.The Women's Rights National Historical Park, most of which opened yesterday at the site of America's first women's rights convention, commemorates a movement still evolving."
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | April 5, 1993
Linda Grant De Pauw always had trouble getting her young son Ben to talk. To coax him along, she would spin fanciful yarns for him based on his favorite television show, "Star Trek."Eventually, she and Ben created a universe of strange creatures and characters. Among them, Maggie Steele, the heroine of Dr. De Pauw's new science fiction novel, "Baptism of Fire."Dr. DePauw, a Pasadena resident, is the founder of the Minerva Center, an international clearinghouse for information about women and the military.
NEWS
March 1, 1993
Women's History Month will be celebrated at Western Maryland College throughout March, with a number of events focusing on issues pertaining to women.All the campus events are free.The Women's History Month "kickoff" will be from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. today in the Decker College Center Pub. Participants will receive ribbons to show solidarity and support of the monthlong celebration.An art exhibition by WMC junior Sara Lundberg will open tomorrow with a reception at 7 p.m. in Gallery One in the Hoover Library.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | April 5, 1993
Linda Grant De Pauw always had trouble getting her young son Ben to talk. To coax him along, she would spin fanciful yarns for him based on his favorite television show, "Star Trek."Eventually, she and Ben created a universe of strange creatures and characters. Among them, Maggie Steele, the heroine of Dr. De Pauw's new science fiction novel, "Baptism of Fire."Dr. DePauw, a Pasadena resident, is the founder of the Minerva Center, an international clearinghouse for information about women and the military.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | November 29, 1992
As part of an ongoing program to expand my personal horizons, I tried on the latest fad in women's shoes: high-heeled pumps with an inch-high platform sole."
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