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By JACQUES KELLY | November 15, 1993
It was back in the early 1970s that a tall, highly intent young man appeared at the Pratt Library's microfilm machines. He seemed to read the tiny print of 1830s newspapers with a seriousness that only a zealot could possess.That individual is James D. Dilts, who spent nearly 20 years researching a project that itself took not much longer to build: The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. At last, the Dilts opus is complete, all 2 1/2 pounds of it, 472 acid-free pages that will cost $50 a volume.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 31, 2011
James Hall Bready, an Evening Sun editorial writer for more than three decades and originator of the "Books and Authors" column that was published in The Baltimore Sun for nearly 50 years, died Saturday of renal failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Homeland resident was 92. Mr. Bready, whose parents were staff members of the old Philadelphia Ledger, was born in Philadelphia and raised in South Jersey. He was a graduate of Woodbury High School and Moorestown Friends School, both in New Jersey.
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FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | July 19, 1992
From The Sun July 19-25, 1842JULY 20: John Lemmon was yesterday committed by Justice Barnard for stealing ham and potatoes from his father.JULY 23: New Cure for Blindness -- Blindness is now cured in England by administering prussic acid. It was suggested by observing that people who had died from the effects of this deadly poison had an unnatural brightness in their eyes for some time afterwards.From The Sun July 19-25, 1892JULY 19: Fully 5,000 colored persons from Baltimore and Washington attended the annual picnic of the Irving Park Camp-Meeting Association, near Annapolis Junction, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts | March 19, 2009
Baltimore's Contemporary Museum at 100 W. Centre St. will be transformed into an environmental think tank and laboratory when the Futurefarmers art collective from San Francisco opens The Reverse Ark: In the Wake, an exhibit exploring the social, historical and environmental history of the city's mills and textile industry, running March 26 to Aug. 22. Using the concept of an "ark" as a place of preservation and exploration, Futurefarmers will work with...
SPORTS
February 10, 2007
Writer shouldn't focus on race David Steele gives new meaning to the term "color commentary." In less than one week, he ballyhooed a Super Bowl featuring two black head coaches, ran a quote hypothesizing that John Mackey's skin color was a factor in delaying his Hall of Fame election, and expounded on the NBA's minority recruiting practices, all before coming full circle to Tony Dungy's race. His column was conspicuously absent Jan. 30, I suspect, because even for him, it was a stretch to memorialize Barbaro as a horse of color.
NEWS
June 15, 1992
TO GO WITH our new diamond at Camden Yards, the Orioles have adopted two new monograms, or logos.In one 1992 logo, a properly beaked and feathered oriole perches on the dot of the letter "i" in Baltimore -- the city name missing in recent seasons. For whoever in the high command restored it, many cheers.The second logo's central figure is a uniformed, right-handed batter. The ornamental letters B B C enfold him: Baltimore Baseball Club. From wide belt to flowing penmanship, the figure bespeaks antiquity.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2006
Shirley B. Clemens, a former newspaper columnist and author who, with her husband, co-authored a history of northern Baltimore County and lectured widely on the subject, died of heart failure Monday at Oak Crest Village, where she had lived since 2004. She was 86. She was born Shirley Bunce in Bayonne, N.J., and moved with her family to Westfield, N.J., in 1929. After earning a bachelor's degree in journalism in 1942 from St. Lawrence University, she returned to Westfield, where she trained as a nurse's aide and volunteered in a military hospital while working as an assistant city editor for the Cranford Chronicle, a newspaper in Cranford, N.J. In 1945, she married an Army veteran, Clarence E. "Clem" Clemens, and after he earned his master's degree from Rutgers University, the couple moved to Corbett, a small village in Baltimore County, where she lived for the next half-century.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2004
Joseph Larkin Arnold, a longtime professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, who specialized in urban history and wrote several well-known books on the subject, died of septic shock Sunday at Howard County General Hospital. He was 66. "Joe Arnold was a vital and enormously important member of the UMBC faculty for some 3 1/2 decades," said John Jeffries, a professor and history department chairman there. "Though his interests and learning were remarkably wide-ranging, his primary focus as a scholar and teacher was on urban history and the history of Baltimore and Maryland.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen | September 11, 1994
Truxon Sykes answers the call to activismCough syrup. Dixon Bill. Panhandling. Homeless Union. Kidney transplant.What are we talking about? Truxon Sykes' life in about 60 seconds.Mr. Sykes, 51, has been a community activist in Baltimore for nearly 40 years. When he was 12, he joined the Young Christian Workers in West Baltimore and warned kids about the dangers of abusing cough syrup.The first of his many visits to City Hall was in 1956. He came on behalf of the Dixon Bill, which called for the integration of city restaurants.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | October 14, 2007
The bold-faced names of the 19th century are all here -- the Sheppards, the Pratts, the Abells --resting in a vast garden graveyard surrounded by some of East Baltimore's toughest neighborhoods. And Wayne Schaumburg knows exactly where to find them. Since 1985, the recently retired city schoolteacher has been leading October and May walking tours of Green Mount Cemetery, where "Baltimore's best are laid to rest," as he likes to say. Nestled among the greenery in the 68-acre necropolis are eight Maryland governors, seven Baltimore mayors, countless local luminaries and one presidential assassin.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | November 18, 2007
It was not that long ago that philanthropy in a place like Baltimore was tinged with an "alms-to-the-poor" aura. There was a bit of noblesse oblige involved in helping ease the miseries of those known as the less fortunate, as well as supporting the standard variety of educational and cultural institutions. That was then. Now, such philanthropy is almost an industry whose leaders spout buzz terms like "strategic coordination" and "leveraging" and "accountability." "Foundations have become much more significant in the local community over the last 20 years," says Robert Embry, head of the Abell Foundation.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | October 14, 2007
The bold-faced names of the 19th century are all here -- the Sheppards, the Pratts, the Abells --resting in a vast garden graveyard surrounded by some of East Baltimore's toughest neighborhoods. And Wayne Schaumburg knows exactly where to find them. Since 1985, the recently retired city schoolteacher has been leading October and May walking tours of Green Mount Cemetery, where "Baltimore's best are laid to rest," as he likes to say. Nestled among the greenery in the 68-acre necropolis are eight Maryland governors, seven Baltimore mayors, countless local luminaries and one presidential assassin.
SPORTS
February 10, 2007
Writer shouldn't focus on race David Steele gives new meaning to the term "color commentary." In less than one week, he ballyhooed a Super Bowl featuring two black head coaches, ran a quote hypothesizing that John Mackey's skin color was a factor in delaying his Hall of Fame election, and expounded on the NBA's minority recruiting practices, all before coming full circle to Tony Dungy's race. His column was conspicuously absent Jan. 30, I suspect, because even for him, it was a stretch to memorialize Barbaro as a horse of color.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2006
Shirley B. Clemens, a former newspaper columnist and author who, with her husband, co-authored a history of northern Baltimore County and lectured widely on the subject, died of heart failure Monday at Oak Crest Village, where she had lived since 2004. She was 86. She was born Shirley Bunce in Bayonne, N.J., and moved with her family to Westfield, N.J., in 1929. After earning a bachelor's degree in journalism in 1942 from St. Lawrence University, she returned to Westfield, where she trained as a nurse's aide and volunteered in a military hospital while working as an assistant city editor for the Cranford Chronicle, a newspaper in Cranford, N.J. In 1945, she married an Army veteran, Clarence E. "Clem" Clemens, and after he earned his master's degree from Rutgers University, the couple moved to Corbett, a small village in Baltimore County, where she lived for the next half-century.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | June 29, 2006
Fifty years ago this week, an old-time Baltimore machine politician who hated freeway driving rose on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives and moved to accept a compromise with the Senate on what he called "the greatest governmental construction program in the history of the world." "Through the provisions of this bill, the American people will ride safely upon many thousands of miles of broad, straight, trouble-free roads, four to eight lines wide, criss-crossing America from coast to coast and border to border," said Maryland Rep. George H. Fallon.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | April 29, 2006
We established loyalties during the childhood Saturdays spent at the neighborhood and downtown movie houses. My own allegiances went to the Waverly, Boulevard, Parkway and Aurora, all still standing, but all out of the motion picture business. I miss them all and the sense they imparted of a neighborhood coming out for a good time. I am indebted to author Robert K. Headley, who in his comprehensive tribute to Baltimore's theaters, Motion Picture Exhibition in Baltimore, An Illustrated History and Directory of Theaters, 1895-2004, takes us from the Alpha (Catonsville)
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2004
Baltimoreans might know that abolitionist Frederick Douglass, civil rights pioneer Thurgood Marshall and jazz great Cab Calloway all called Charm City home. City leaders hope to promote those legends to the world with the latest and most ambitious push to market Baltimore's African-American history and legacies to visitors. Mayor Martin O'Malley and the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association unveiled yesterday Baltimore's African American Heritage and Attraction Guide. The glossy 25-page guide includes an overview of the city's black history and details on cultural landmarks and museums.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | March 23, 1995
Question: What Baltimore landmark was visited by Queen Mary, Babe Ruth, Clark Gable, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor and Jimmy Carter?Answer: Pennsylvania Station.We don't attach the rosy aura of history to Baltimore's main Amtrak station.But it is time this 1911 work of solid and honest architecture was given some applause. Thanks to writer-historian Frank Wrabel, there's now a concise, well-documented history of Baltimore's fine old passenger station.His 51-page article, published with excellent color and black-and-white photos, is called "Terminals, Tunnels and Turmoil, the History of Pennsylvania Station -- Baltimore."
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | January 7, 2006
Northeast Baltimore's byways and bungalows have found a champion in Eric L. Holcomb, whose new 266-page volume tours the porch-front charm of the self-effacing neighborhoods tucked behind the Harford-Belair road main streets. Even Baltimoreans familiar with the area will find something new to learn within The City As Suburb: A History of Northeast Baltimore Since 1660. Edison Highway, I discovered, was named by Baltimore rowhouse builder E.J. Gallagher. Mr. Gallagher had been asked to name the boulevard being planned in 1931 to link East Baltimore's industrial sites with residential neighborhoods, as we say, "out the Belair Road."
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