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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 28, 1997
In 27 years of plain-spoken opinion written for Time magazine, Robert Hughes of Australia has become America's most famous art critic. He will become even better known through his latest project: an eight-part television series, "American Visions," that debuts tonight on PBS.The series is accompanied by a hefty book ("American Visions: The Epic History of Art in America") that sells for $65 and an issue of Time entirely written by Hughes ($3.95).Hughes peppers "American Visions" with his trenchant opinions, which provide quotable quotes on everything from Thomas Jefferson (loves him)
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By Nancy Forgione and Nancy Forgione,Special to the Sun | November 5, 2006
Visual Shock: A History of Art Controversies in American Culture Michael Kammen Alfred A. Knopf / 2006 / 450 pages / $35 Among the provocative questions in the 19th- and early 20th-century art world was this: Could female art students sketch a nude male in life drawing class and remain pure in thought? Would a jockstrap solve the problem? This might seem an amusing example of tame Victorian prudery when compared to recent challenges to the limits of decency such as Robert Mapplethorpe's disturbingly explicit photographs.
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By Daniel Grant | February 28, 1993
FROM MANET TO MANHATTAN: THE RISE OF THE MODERN ART MARKET. Peter Watson. Random House. 558 pages. $35. The history of art and the history of art patronage are the same history, but many people have sought to overlook that fact. The preferred romantic conception is that art and commerce could not be further removed. Dealers are "lice on the backs of the artists," artist Marcel Duchamp claimed earlier in this century and, 100 years earlier, English poet and painter William Blake wrote, "Where any view of money exists, art cannot be carried on."
NEWS
February 1, 2000
Betty Macdonald Batcheller, 92, an original member of Martha Graham's first dance company in the 1920s, died Jan. 15 in Greenwich, Conn. She joined two dancers to perform in Miss Graham's first independent program as a choreographer at the 48th Street Theater in Manhattan in April 1926. Friedrich Gulda, 69, widely considered one of Austria's foremost classical and jazz pianists, died Thursday in Vienna, Austria, of an apparent heart attack. He was praised by music critics for his interpretation of the piano music of Beethoven, Bach and Mozart.
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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1999
The dean of the Johns Hopkins University's Krieger School of Arts and Sciences has abruptly resigned after only 18 months in the position.In a statement sent by e-mail to faculty and students this week, President William R. Brody said Herbert L. Kessler left for "personal and professional reasons."An announcement of an interim or permanent replacement is expected today.Kessler, who was chairman of the history of art department before becoming dean in May 1998, refused to comment yesterday on the reasons for his resignation.
NEWS
February 1, 2000
Betty Macdonald Batcheller, 92, an original member of Martha Graham's first dance company in the 1920s, died Jan. 15 in Greenwich, Conn. She joined two dancers to perform in Miss Graham's first independent program as a choreographer at the 48th Street Theater in Manhattan in April 1926. Friedrich Gulda, 69, widely considered one of Austria's foremost classical and jazz pianists, died Thursday in Vienna, Austria, of an apparent heart attack. He was praised by music critics for his interpretation of the piano music of Beethoven, Bach and Mozart.
NEWS
By Daniel Grant | October 11, 1992
A GUIDE TO ART. Edited by Sandro Sproccati. Abrams.288 pages. $29.95. This has been a time of re-evaluation for the history of art. Revisionist theories of art keep appearing in book form; museums are increasingly creating exhibitions based on new studies of their own permanent collections. One is also seeing a growing number of history-of-art books that are being revised (Janson's "History of Art" and Gardner's "Art Through the Ages") written (Sanders' "The Nude: A New Perspective" and Wilkins and Schultz's "Art Past/Art Present")
NEWS
By Daniel Grant | June 23, 1991
HISTORY OF ART, 4TH EDITION.H. W. Janson,revised and expandedby Anthony F. Janson.Harry N. Abrams.856 pages; $55. Some fathers leave the store to their children when they retire or die. Horst Woldermar Janson, a professor of fine arts at New York University who died in 1982 at the age of 69, left The Book to his son, Anthony, for periodic revisions and updating.The father's text first was published in 1962, and he revised it in 1977. Almost every college student taking a general history of art course has been assigned this text.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 16, 1997
Elizabeth Cropper and her husband, Charles Dempsey, authors of the book "Nicholas Poussin: Friendship and the Love of Painting," will receive the 1997 Mitchell Prize for the History of Art at a reception Tuesday at the Knickerbocker Club in New York. Both are professors at the Johns Hopkins University.The $15,000 prize is awarded annually to recognize authors of books in English for contributing to the study and understanding of the visual arts.The Mitchell Prize was established in 1977 by Jan Mitchell, a renowned art collector and president of the Mitchell Foundation for the History of Art.At Hopkins, Dempsey is professor of Italian Renaissance and baroque art in the art history department, which he chaired from 1989 to 1995.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | March 1, 1995
Everywhere she goes, Wilhelmina Holladay asks people to name five women artists. Most can't. They name Georgia O'Keeffe and Mary Cassatt, then stop."Once in a while someone will come up with Grandma Moses," says Mrs. Holladay.It isn't that people are biased; they just weren't taught female artists. "Even among very well-educated people in our country, even if they took a course in the history of art, there wasn't anybody in the textbooks," says Mrs. Holladay, who points out that the most popular art text in America -- H. W. Janson's "History of Art" -- didn't mention a single woman until its third edition of 1987.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1999
The dean of the Johns Hopkins University's Krieger School of Arts and Sciences has abruptly resigned after only 18 months in the position.In a statement sent by e-mail to faculty and students this week, President William R. Brody said Herbert L. Kessler left for "personal and professional reasons."An announcement of an interim or permanent replacement is expected today.Kessler, who was chairman of the history of art department before becoming dean in May 1998, refused to comment yesterday on the reasons for his resignation.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 25, 1999
During a family visit to North Carolina last weekend I saw "Phantom Menace," the newest "Star Wars" epic, at a local multiplex.Folks in Greensboro seemed mercifully resistant to the hype that envelops the movie elsewhere. To them, "Phantom Menace" was just a movie, thank you.Yet the very equanimity with which they took the film struck me as a portent of sorts. It made me wonder whether when people look back on our century, they will remember Pablo Picasso's "Guernica" or George Lucas' "Star Wars" as the art work that most expressed its age.There's certainly an argument to be made that the 20th-century marked a watershed in the history of art.Ours is the first century ever to see motion pictures, television, radio and the recording arts.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 16, 1997
Elizabeth Cropper and her husband, Charles Dempsey, authors of the book "Nicholas Poussin: Friendship and the Love of Painting," will receive the 1997 Mitchell Prize for the History of Art at a reception Tuesday at the Knickerbocker Club in New York. Both are professors at the Johns Hopkins University.The $15,000 prize is awarded annually to recognize authors of books in English for contributing to the study and understanding of the visual arts.The Mitchell Prize was established in 1977 by Jan Mitchell, a renowned art collector and president of the Mitchell Foundation for the History of Art.At Hopkins, Dempsey is professor of Italian Renaissance and baroque art in the art history department, which he chaired from 1989 to 1995.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 28, 1997
In 27 years of plain-spoken opinion written for Time magazine, Robert Hughes of Australia has become America's most famous art critic. He will become even better known through his latest project: an eight-part television series, "American Visions," that debuts tonight on PBS.The series is accompanied by a hefty book ("American Visions: The Epic History of Art in America") that sells for $65 and an issue of Time entirely written by Hughes ($3.95).Hughes peppers "American Visions" with his trenchant opinions, which provide quotable quotes on everything from Thomas Jefferson (loves him)
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | May 11, 1997
Much is being made of a television series by Robert Hughes, the eminent art critic, that will be shown on public broadcasting channels beginning May 28. Far more should be made of his associated book, "American Visions: The Epic History of Art in America" (Knopf. 635 pages. $65).Each of the eight elements of the TV production contains about spoken words. Each of the book's nine chapters contains about 20,000 words of splendidly fluent, lean prose. As active as Hughes and his film crew were in traveling to 100 locations the length and breadth of the land, the most important visual aids to his larger task are reproductions of art. In the book they are superbly integrated in the text, and far clearer, on fine coated stock than on a screen.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | February 18, 1996
You can argue endlessly over abstract art -- over why it came about, whether it was a good or a bad development in the history of art, whether it's soulless or reflects man's highest aspirations and ideals, whether it's a dead end, whether it's dead. What you can't do is deny its status as the most central and potent movement in 20th century art.Similarly, you can argue with a lot of things about "Abstraction in the Twentieth Century," the museum-filling show that just opened at the Guggenheim in New York.
NEWS
By Nancy Forgione and Nancy Forgione,Special to the Sun | November 5, 2006
Visual Shock: A History of Art Controversies in American Culture Michael Kammen Alfred A. Knopf / 2006 / 450 pages / $35 Among the provocative questions in the 19th- and early 20th-century art world was this: Could female art students sketch a nude male in life drawing class and remain pure in thought? Would a jockstrap solve the problem? This might seem an amusing example of tame Victorian prudery when compared to recent challenges to the limits of decency such as Robert Mapplethorpe's disturbingly explicit photographs.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | May 11, 1997
Much is being made of a television series by Robert Hughes, the eminent art critic, that will be shown on public broadcasting channels beginning May 28. Far more should be made of his associated book, "American Visions: The Epic History of Art in America" (Knopf. 635 pages. $65).Each of the eight elements of the TV production contains about spoken words. Each of the book's nine chapters contains about 20,000 words of splendidly fluent, lean prose. As active as Hughes and his film crew were in traveling to 100 locations the length and breadth of the land, the most important visual aids to his larger task are reproductions of art. In the book they are superbly integrated in the text, and far clearer, on fine coated stock than on a screen.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | March 1, 1995
Everywhere she goes, Wilhelmina Holladay asks people to name five women artists. Most can't. They name Georgia O'Keeffe and Mary Cassatt, then stop."Once in a while someone will come up with Grandma Moses," says Mrs. Holladay.It isn't that people are biased; they just weren't taught female artists. "Even among very well-educated people in our country, even if they took a course in the history of art, there wasn't anybody in the textbooks," says Mrs. Holladay, who points out that the most popular art text in America -- H. W. Janson's "History of Art" -- didn't mention a single woman until its third edition of 1987.
NEWS
By Daniel Grant | February 28, 1993
FROM MANET TO MANHATTAN: THE RISE OF THE MODERN ART MARKET. Peter Watson. Random House. 558 pages. $35. The history of art and the history of art patronage are the same history, but many people have sought to overlook that fact. The preferred romantic conception is that art and commerce could not be further removed. Dealers are "lice on the backs of the artists," artist Marcel Duchamp claimed earlier in this century and, 100 years earlier, English poet and painter William Blake wrote, "Where any view of money exists, art cannot be carried on."
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