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Sam Farmer | September 18, 2011
Todd Haley is focused on the future but drawing inspiration from the past. The Chiefs coach, whose 0-1 team visits the Lions on Sunday, is at a pivotal moment in his career. His team needs to make a better showing than it did in a 41-7 loss to the Bills in its opener and must do so without second-year safety Eric Berry , one of its best players. He's done for the season with a knee injury. Haley spoke to his team before Wednesday's practice and, for inspiration, invoked two up-from-the-rubble teams: the 1989 Steelers and 1999 Jets.
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NEWS
November 5, 2012
Maryland was established on the principles of equality, religious freedom, separation of church and state, and creating opportunities for all to achieve economic self-sufficiency. No place is this more clear than at Historic St. Mary's City. St. Mary's City was the first city and capital of Maryland, the first successful proprietary colony in English North America, the first place freedom of religion was established in America, and also the first place to seek the separation of church and state in America.
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SPORTS
By Mark Gonzales, Tribune newspapers | October 15, 2010
The one-year transformation from a 73-inning reliever to a 204-inning starting pitcher seems astonishing. But the commitment Rangers left-hander C.J. Wilson made last winter was slightly more impressive than his vast knowledge of those who made a similar transformation. Wilson, who will start Game 1 of the American League Championship Series on Friday night, is aware White Sox rookie Chris Sale earned a few saves during his two-month stint in the majors. He also recognizes that several pitchers, namely Cubs Hall of Famer Ferguson Jenkins, made a similar move from the bullpen more than 40 years ago. It's just one reason Wilson takes his sudden success in stride — even after winning 15 games for the Rangers this season and limiting the Rays to two hits over 61/3 innings in Game 2 of the AL Division Series.
SPORTS
By Andrew Conrad, Baltimore Sun Media Group | September 13, 2012
With his team trailing by two games at River Hill on Thursday, Glenelg coach Don Beall pulled his players aside for a quick history lesson. The year was 2006, and Glenelg trailed River Hill, 2-0, before beating the odds to win in five sets. "They were up 24-14 (in the third game) and we came back to beat them and then won," said Beall, whose 10th ranked team repeated the feat on Thursday to knock off No. 4 River Hill, 20-25, 24-26, 25-23, 26-24, 15-10. "I brought that whole scenario up in the huddle and the kids responded and played looser those last three games," Beall said.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2010
Many of the 1,400 students at Fort McHenry on Friday had heard about the defense of Baltimore in 1814 against a British amphibious invasion, an American triumph that inspired Francis Scott Key to pen what would become the national anthem. Taking part in the "Young Defenders" event enabled the youngsters to experience the historic moment, as they shrieked to the near-deafening sounds of cannon blasts and captured the demonstrations on cell phone cameras. "We hear about it in class, but to actually see it is totally different; you understand the environment from actually seeing it," said Jennifer Vukov, 16, of Dundalk, a junior at Patapsco High School.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 24, 1999
Here's the plot: A political wife learns her husband is having an affair. She decides to stand by him, even campaign for him, in part because she is the brains behind much of his social consciousness.Sound familiar?This isn't a tale of current events. It's an old story in Washington. Specifically, it's the story of Eleanor Roosevelt as celebrated in the musical "Eleanor: An American Love Story."Written by Jonathan Bolt, with a score by composer Thomas Tierney and lyricist John Forster, "Eleanor" is a pleasant musical American history lesson, which makes it an ideal fit for America's most historic theater, Ford's Theatre in Washington.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1997
Innovative teachers at the Key School in Annapolis have used simulated archaeological pits complete with planted, pseudo-Colonial artifacts to teach their students about history.Now, they want to give their students the real thing.Eight teachers at Key recently beat out 331 competitors to win a $23,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities that will allow them to work with scholars from the Maryland State Archives and London Town House and Gardens to create a history lesson for children.
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 2001
FOURTH-GRADERS at Linton Springs Elementary School got a feel for what it was like to be a child during Colonial times in Maryland. On Friday, pupils and their teachers dressed in Colonial garb, with boys in rolled-up pants and vests, and girls in cotton dresses with aprons and bonnets. Pam Sherfey, a fourth-grade teacher, said the day provided a hands-on history lesson. Teachers Sarah Martin, Stacey Phillips, Greta Gilmore and Stephen Speck also participated. Each teacher took on a different responsibility in his or her classroom, and pupils rotated among rooms throughout the day. Ruppert discussed items Colonists used for writing, noting that these items were valuable and difficult to obtain.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | October 5, 1990
Robin MacColl had some trouble describing what it was like to shed her modern trappings in order to bring to life her post-Revolutionary War history lesson."
NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 26, 2001
Students had all the answers at yesterday's "It's BlackAdemic" contest. Teams representing about 20 Howard County schools met at Oakland Mills High School to showcase their knowledge of African-American history, biography and achievement. Using a quiz show format, "It's BlackAdemic" matched area schools at three levels of competition - elementary, middle and high school. First-place prizes went to Centennial High School and Oakland Mills Middle School. The elementary school teams were made up of pupils from several schools, and each participant received a trophy and a certificate.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2012
Anthony W. Batts, the former Long Beach and Oakland chief who is poised to become Baltimore's next police commissioner, is making the rounds - shaking hands with officers, speaking at district roll calls and joining citizens on neighbor walks. The city police union has said that they are looking forward to Batts taking the helm, but within the department many are grousing about the prospect of an outsider turning the agency upside-down. It's not unexpected until Batts gets a chance to prove himself.
NEWS
April 11, 2012
It is time for a little history lesson. In 1775 King George III so vehemently opposed the colonists having any say in who should act on their behalf that he hired Hessian troops to kill their nascent desire to have a modicum of representation in Parliament. The result was a revolution that cost King George the most valuable part of the British Empire. Fast forward to 2012, and we have the would be King Kamenetz, who is so opposed to his subjects having a say in the affairs of local government that he hired his version of the Hessians in the form of Del. Sheila Hixson to ravage our representatives in Annapolis, to say nothing of the voters of Baltimore County.
SPORTS
Sam Farmer | September 18, 2011
Todd Haley is focused on the future but drawing inspiration from the past. The Chiefs coach, whose 0-1 team visits the Lions on Sunday, is at a pivotal moment in his career. His team needs to make a better showing than it did in a 41-7 loss to the Bills in its opener and must do so without second-year safety Eric Berry , one of its best players. He's done for the season with a knee injury. Haley spoke to his team before Wednesday's practice and, for inspiration, invoked two up-from-the-rubble teams: the 1989 Steelers and 1999 Jets.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2011
One harsh winter long ago, as he led an encampment of soldiers near a European forest, it never occurred to Alfred H.M. Shehab, then a brash young Army lieutenant, that he and his 30-man unit were a part of military history. "A platoon leader is so busy thinking about what might happen and how to make things go right" that it's hard to grasp much of a broader perspective, says Shehab, a 91-year-old retired lieutenant colonel who lives near Fort Meade. As it was, the 3rd Platoon of B Troop in the 38th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron (Mechanized)
SPORTS
By Mark Gonzales, Tribune newspapers | October 15, 2010
The one-year transformation from a 73-inning reliever to a 204-inning starting pitcher seems astonishing. But the commitment Rangers left-hander C.J. Wilson made last winter was slightly more impressive than his vast knowledge of those who made a similar transformation. Wilson, who will start Game 1 of the American League Championship Series on Friday night, is aware White Sox rookie Chris Sale earned a few saves during his two-month stint in the majors. He also recognizes that several pitchers, namely Cubs Hall of Famer Ferguson Jenkins, made a similar move from the bullpen more than 40 years ago. It's just one reason Wilson takes his sudden success in stride — even after winning 15 games for the Rangers this season and limiting the Rays to two hits over 61/3 innings in Game 2 of the AL Division Series.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2010
Many of the 1,400 students at Fort McHenry on Friday had heard about the defense of Baltimore in 1814 against a British amphibious invasion, an American triumph that inspired Francis Scott Key to pen what would become the national anthem. Taking part in the "Young Defenders" event enabled the youngsters to experience the historic moment, as they shrieked to the near-deafening sounds of cannon blasts and captured the demonstrations on cell phone cameras. "We hear about it in class, but to actually see it is totally different; you understand the environment from actually seeing it," said Jennifer Vukov, 16, of Dundalk, a junior at Patapsco High School.
FEATURES
By Cary Darling and Cary Darling,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | March 5, 1997
The history of hip-hop at the movies is not pretty.While hip-hop culture has often been used effectively to push the narrative of a drama -- "Menace II Society," for example -- it has been less successful as the subject of a movie itself. "Wild Style," from the early '80s, was a standout, and now so is "Rhyme and Reason," a documentary from Peter Spirer, a 1994 Oscar nominee for his short subject, "Blood Ties: The Life and Work of Sally Mann."Allowing two generations of hip-hop heavies -- from Kurtis Blow, Chuck D, KRS-One, Dr. Dre and Heavy D representing the old school, to the Fugees, Mack 10, Cypress Hill, and MC Eiht in the new -- to talk while dealing with such issues as violence, sexism and the West Coast/East Coast rap feud, "R&R" is a wide-ranging look at why hip-hop has become the voice of young urban America.
NEWS
April 11, 2012
It is time for a little history lesson. In 1775 King George III so vehemently opposed the colonists having any say in who should act on their behalf that he hired Hessian troops to kill their nascent desire to have a modicum of representation in Parliament. The result was a revolution that cost King George the most valuable part of the British Empire. Fast forward to 2012, and we have the would be King Kamenetz, who is so opposed to his subjects having a say in the affairs of local government that he hired his version of the Hessians in the form of Del. Sheila Hixson to ravage our representatives in Annapolis, to say nothing of the voters of Baltimore County.
SPORTS
April 23, 2010
The Johns Hopkins men's lacrosse team still has three games left in the regular season, but the No. 15 Blue Jays (5-6) are talking playoffs. As in, if they lose one more game, their season might be over. "Our playoffs start this week," senior attackman Steven Boyle said, referring to Saturday's contest against Navy at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis at noon. "We can't have any slip-ups and we can't drop another one. We've got to come out and try to get a ‘W.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | January 25, 2008
There's embarrassment and shame in this admission, but you need to know: We forgot about Woody Sauldsberry. He was the NBA's Rookie of the Year in 1958, just the second black man to win the award. He played for four NBA teams and later the Harlem Globetrotters. Retirement wasn't always easy. Diabetes claimed one of his legs and had its sights set on the other. When Sauldsberry died last year in Baltimore, there was no obituary in the next day's newspaper and no old highlights aired on that night's SportsCenter.
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