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NEWS
March 16, 2011
The writer who wishes to smear another writer and proponent of the Tubman statue with the noxious taint of "political correctness" couldn't be more wrong ("Tubman statue: political correctness run amok," March 15). He believes John Hanson will be unfairly relegated because he was a white male and Tubman unreasonably elevated because she was not. My academic experience, albeit a long time ago, was decidedly to the contrary. Although I excelled in history and got a academic prize for it along with a degree cum laude from Western Maryland College, I was somehow unaware of who Harriet Tubman was. The full importance of her accomplishments was not brought home to me until I read a chapter of "Black Profiles In Courage" by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar in a Cumberland bookstore in the 1990s.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Frustrated by toiling in the minor leagues for six years and questioning whether he'd ever get the opportunity to make it to the majors, Orioles catcher Caleb Joseph considered retiring this offseason when he went unprotected by the O's and went unselected in December's Rule 5 Draft. But now Joseph, a 28-year-old rookie, has homered his way into franchise history, becoming the first Orioles catcher and the first rookie to hit a home run in five straight games after his two-run homer in the second-inning of Saturday's 10-3 win over the St. Louis Cardinals.
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NEWS
December 28, 2010
Seldom have I read a more biased and offensive article than Ross Mackenzie's op-ed, "To congressional Democrats: Merry Christmas and thanks for nothing" (Dec. 26). One could have expected such a distorted statement in the Wall Street Journal or the Weekly Standard but not from the usually balanced and mainstream Baltimore Sun. The article cries out for repudiation. Most observers have concluded that the Congressional session just ended was one of the most active and progressive since the days of Franklin D. Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | November 22, 2013
The walk home from school is what I remember most. It should have been a lighthearted schoolboy stroll for a sixth grader on a cloudy and mild Friday in late November, filled with visions of the weekend ahead and the long Thanksgiving holiday just a few days away. Instead, it was a mournful plodding along a route I had walked daily, yet, on that afternoon, my surroundings seemed somehow alien. The remnants of crisp fallen leaves crackling under foot served as constant reminders that, with each step, my childhood was palpably draining out of me and being left behind to evaporate into memory.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Frustrated by toiling in the minor leagues for six years and questioning whether he'd ever get the opportunity to make it to the majors, Orioles catcher Caleb Joseph considered retiring this offseason when he went unprotected by the O's and went unselected in December's Rule 5 Draft. But now Joseph, a 28-year-old rookie, has homered his way into franchise history, becoming the first Orioles catcher and the first rookie to hit a home run in five straight games after his two-run homer in the second-inning of Saturday's 10-3 win over the St. Louis Cardinals.
FEATURES
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Sun Staff Writer Madison, Wis | September 11, 1994
Madison, Wis.--The first time Jean B. Lee wandered the Southern Maryland countryside in search of the nation's past, she didn't need a road map to find her way.Although she grew up in Wisconsin, far from the Chesapeake Bay tidelands, Ms. Lee knew from her research on early American history how important the region's waterways were to Colonial Charles County. The rivers and creeks gave her bearings to find historic sites along the shoreline."I will never forget that I could make my way around Charles County because of my knowledge of 18th-century maps," says the University of Wisconsin history professor, recalling a trip she made to the area in the late 1960s.
NEWS
June 24, 2011
While it is commendable that Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates weeps for his dead soldiers ("Gates showing job's toll at end," June 20), his tears are nothing compared to the millions shed by families, and let us not forget the children weeping here and abroad, since the United States went to war in late 2001. If Dick Cheney had not wanted to invade Iraq already by the afternoon of Sept. 11, 2001, and George W. Bush and Barack Obama had glanced at a few history books and thought about Afghanistan in connection with the experiences of Britain, Russia, and even the U.S. there during the last century, perhaps Mr. Gates and the rest of us who grieve would not be weeping now. Laurie Taylor-Mitchell, Towson
NEWS
June 8, 2011
Dearest Sarah, You are my hero! It would have been so easy to say, "Oops, I misspoke. You see, I've been on the road, I haven't slept much, and I have this terrible fire in the belly. Of course, Paul Revere wasn't warning the British…" But no. You stuck to your story with, "I know my American history. " What do those Bostonians know about Paul Revere anyway? The important thing here is that you looked so attractive while saying it! Where were you, Sarah Palin, when I was getting a "D" in American history in college?
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Staff Writer | July 2, 1993
Nestled among the shops in the Shipley-Linthicum Shopping Center is the culmination of one man's dream: Toomey's Bookshop.Daniel Toomey and his wife, Carol, opened their shop on Camp Meade Road last month. While their inventory has some new titles, most are used.The Toomeys, who live in Ferndale, have compiled about 3,000 books, not including paperbacks, Mrs. Toomey said. Most of the collection concentrates on military history and the Civil War, but the store also carries a wide variety of books on topics ranging from law to art to science.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | August 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The dinner party gossip here these days is about what legacy President Clinton would like to leave when he completes his term three years from now. The evidence seems contradictory.The president used his press conference the other day both to take a victory lap celebrating the success of what he called "the vital center" and to spell out an agenda for the rest of the year. But Mr. Clinton has always been an extremely ambitious politician, so it is hard to imagine he doesn't have some grand design for the history books.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2013
Thirty-two years ago this week, tennis pro Martina Navratilova was outed in a New York Daily News article. Ten years before that, lesbians picketed outside a lesbian-oriented bar whose owner was reportedly hostile to the growing gay liberation movement. That's according to Quist , anyway. A new mobile app created by Maryland resident Sarah Prager and designed by Baltimore-based firm Natural Fusion, Quist draws on the "today in LGBT history" model to provide an interactive look at events and milestones often left at the margins.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
Baltimoreans like their beer, and so far it's been a good year. My colleague Erik Maza , who keeps his eye on the local brew scene, has been the bearer of malty good news. He has written about the Heavy Seas Alehouse, which opened earlier this year - the first new bar of 2012 - and the glasses of Heavy Seas Beer, Peg Leg Imperial Stout and Pale Ale that flow from its taps. Several weeks ago, he reported that the Peabody Heights Brewery set to open in Waverly will be the city's first large-scale brewery operation to get under way in more than three decades.
NEWS
June 24, 2011
While it is commendable that Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates weeps for his dead soldiers ("Gates showing job's toll at end," June 20), his tears are nothing compared to the millions shed by families, and let us not forget the children weeping here and abroad, since the United States went to war in late 2001. If Dick Cheney had not wanted to invade Iraq already by the afternoon of Sept. 11, 2001, and George W. Bush and Barack Obama had glanced at a few history books and thought about Afghanistan in connection with the experiences of Britain, Russia, and even the U.S. there during the last century, perhaps Mr. Gates and the rest of us who grieve would not be weeping now. Laurie Taylor-Mitchell, Towson
NEWS
June 8, 2011
Dearest Sarah, You are my hero! It would have been so easy to say, "Oops, I misspoke. You see, I've been on the road, I haven't slept much, and I have this terrible fire in the belly. Of course, Paul Revere wasn't warning the British…" But no. You stuck to your story with, "I know my American history. " What do those Bostonians know about Paul Revere anyway? The important thing here is that you looked so attractive while saying it! Where were you, Sarah Palin, when I was getting a "D" in American history in college?
NEWS
March 16, 2011
The writer who wishes to smear another writer and proponent of the Tubman statue with the noxious taint of "political correctness" couldn't be more wrong ("Tubman statue: political correctness run amok," March 15). He believes John Hanson will be unfairly relegated because he was a white male and Tubman unreasonably elevated because she was not. My academic experience, albeit a long time ago, was decidedly to the contrary. Although I excelled in history and got a academic prize for it along with a degree cum laude from Western Maryland College, I was somehow unaware of who Harriet Tubman was. The full importance of her accomplishments was not brought home to me until I read a chapter of "Black Profiles In Courage" by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar in a Cumberland bookstore in the 1990s.
NEWS
December 28, 2010
Seldom have I read a more biased and offensive article than Ross Mackenzie's op-ed, "To congressional Democrats: Merry Christmas and thanks for nothing" (Dec. 26). One could have expected such a distorted statement in the Wall Street Journal or the Weekly Standard but not from the usually balanced and mainstream Baltimore Sun. The article cries out for repudiation. Most observers have concluded that the Congressional session just ended was one of the most active and progressive since the days of Franklin D. Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczk and Peg Adamarczk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 21, 2001
EFFORTS TO preserve Pasadena's history just got a boost, thanks to an infusion of cash from a group of local business owners. The board of directors of Pasadena Business Association has agreed to donate $5,000, to be given in two installments, to Friends of Hancock's Resolution. The Friends of Hancock's Resolution is a volunteer group that operates the historic Hancock's Resolution farm site on Bayside Beach Road. The group offers public tours Sundays from April through October. The donation is part of the proceeds from sales of the PBA's two local history books, Between Two Rivers and The Pasadena Peninsula.
NEWS
By Judith Dobler | March 1, 1995
GROWING UP during the age of "Ozzie and Harriet," "Father Knows Best," and "Leave it to Beaver," my friends and I assumed that women weren't in our history books because they had done nothing worth mentioning. The most any woman could hope for was to have been born into prominence like Queen Elizabeth.The women we knew were too busy being housewives and mothers to pursue other interests. And raising children was supposed to be so rewarding that few of us considered other options.We believed in Cinderella: Once we married our prince we would live happily ever after.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
Minutes before convicted Washington-area sniper John Allen Muhammad was executed Tuesday night in Virginia, he said goodbye to a Baltimore lawyer who had become a trusted confidant. "I love you, brother," Muhammad said, according to the attorney, J. Wyndal Gordon, and Gordon told the condemned man he loved him back. Then Gordon shook Muhammad's hand through the bars and clutched his elbow with his free hand. "I was looking at him in his eyes," he said. "There was just no fear there, like he had resigned to it."
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